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Discussion Starter #1
Hey fellas.

So I've been dying to get a bike since I was a kid and I'm close to finally having the opportunity to do it. I've looked at I don't know how many motorcycles and have been back and forth about what I really want. I used to think I wanted a crotch rocket, then a cruiser, and back and forth, and I think I've finally found a sort of compromise.

For some reason I'm really drawn to the Thruxton 900. It's relatively light weight with a decent amount of engine/torque and it looks pretty freaking cool. Just wondering if it's a good bike to learn on. Also wondering if I want a new bike as a first bike, I'd hate to lay it down in some super noob wreck. For around $9-10K it seems like a pretty reasonable price for a first bike though. Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sweet thanks for the link. Haven't done the course yet, gonna schedule it in the next month or so though.
 

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There are several video's by CaptCrash. You should watch as many as you can. They are great and many of them are part of the class. Good Luck
 

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The Thruxton wouldn't be a bad motorcycle to learn on. I recommend taking the class before getting serious about buying though.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah I'm waiting to buy until I do the course and move from FL to CA in about 6 months so I'm in no rush, just throwing ideas around
 

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wondering if I want a new bike as a first bike, I'd hate to lay it down in some super noob wreck.
There's pros and cons to most things in life. A used bike will be less expensive than a new bike and you'll take a much smaller depreciation hit when you sell it to upgrade, at which time you'll have hopefully increased your skills considerably. If you buy a used bike and you drop it(the probability of this is high), it'll be far less traumatic than if you do it to your brand new $10k Triumph. A used bike is a better all-around tool while you figure things out.

A new bike has it's advantageous as well. It's got a warranty should a problem arise and if you take care of it, it should last a long time. When you buy a used bike, you don't know the history of the bike or seller. Sometimes you get a great seller and other times you get a turd, but it's hard to know since you just met.

Before I took the BRC, I wanted a Moto Guzzi V7, then a Suzuki Burgman so bad, but after taking the course, I realized I had much to learn and a smaller bike would be a better fit for learning the skills I need. There's a lot to motorcycling you just can't learn anywhere, but on a bike. I also didn't want to spend $10k on a bike until I was sure it was for me, so I ended up buying a new old stock TU250x(kind of like a mini V7 or Bonneville) at very attractive price. I went new cause I'm not the wrench type, so knowing it was fresh from the factory was worth the extra cash to me. The bigger bikes will still be there down the road should I decide to move up. Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Appreciate the feedback. The Guzzi is a pretty fun looking ride too. But yeah the new/used thing is my biggest struggle. From what I gather it's a pretty good possibility that I'll lay a bike down as a new guy at some point.
I'll talk more with the BRC guys but I guess I probably will go with something used. I was thinking of some dual sport or something cuz they seem like they can take a little more abuse and I won't cry as much if it gets a little beat up. Looks like I can get something for $4,000 and under pretty easy too. Any good suggestions in that category? Going with something used I know the basics of checking overall condition/fluids etc when buying but I'm kinda lost with mileage. What's high mileage for a bike? Not sure how much the higher rpm motors play into wear and tear.
 

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Welcome to the forum. I suggest you have a ceiling of $3000-$4000, and buy used. It's your first bike, not your last. Consider this scenario...

You buy a nice clean Suzuki GS500 for $2500, it is less than 7 years old, with reasonable mileage. You ride it for 2 years, maybe drop it, maybe you don't, and you are ready for more bike. You sell it for $2000. Net loss: $500

Or, you buy a brand new Thruxton for $10,000, ride it for 2 years, and maybe you drop it, maybe you don't, and you are ready for more bike. You sell it for $6500. Net loss: $3500

The money you lose in the second scenario is enough to buy your first bike, and all your gear.
 

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^^^^^^^^Hawk nails it here not to bring any bad karma on you but odds are 99% you will drop it at some point even if it's just in the driveway!I have been riding nearly 40 years and fell over a couple of weeks ago it happens.And if you are new to this your first bike may end up being not what you really thought it would,good luck be safe and "Never Stop Ridin' "
 

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First bike? Get a 80's honda/suzuki. Ride it for a few months, get comfortable. Drop it a few times and no big deal! Drop a 2009 Vulcan down a few times.....Your goggles may fill up with tears.
 

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I started on a brand new 600 Shadow back in 1997 (still got it, hence the prior comment ;) ). I bought a 1500 Vulcan a year later as an additional bike, and a year after that I traded it back down for another 600 Shadow to do what I wanted to do from the get go: customize the hell out of it. Dropped down in size again later on and picked up a 250 Rebel.

The 1500 was dropped at speed twice during that one year tenure. To date the only parts of the Shadows and Rebels that have contacted the ground are the tires and kickstands.

And occasional acorn nut under the foot peg. :biggrin:

The point is the right tool for the right job isn't defined by new or used, rather what works best in a novice's hands. IMHO that's something comfy under 50HP and under 500 pounds.
 

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Shadowshack has a point.
I say older bikes because that was my personal experience.
He started a different way and it worked fine for him.
New or used, if it's a suitable bike for the job, it should work.
Now lets define the job at hand!
We all want fast showroom ready bikes, but baby steps. Learning to ride and having fun is the task.
Quoting shadowshack, under 500 lbs, 50 hp. Pretty good standards to go by.
I started on a 93 nighthawk 250, went to 81 kaw 440, took a jump to a v65 magna 1100, bounced around on a few others for a while, then landed my 03 vtx 1800 and building a 83 shadow 500. I spent 2 years on the 440, that's where i learned most of what I know about riding. I dropped it twice,
front tire sank in gravel and went down at 5 mph.
other time had oil leak that soaked the back tire, went down in the first curve at 70.
Shadows are great bikes! Reliable and enough scoot to keep you satisfied even after you get confident on your new found wheels.
 

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I've bought new several times, knowing that I won't recoup anywhere near the original cost of the motorcycle at resale or trade-in.

There are some who are shocked and disappointed when they find out about the Law of Depreciation after the fact. Going in with your eyes open and planning ahead are important.

For a first motorcycle, I'd recommend fairly recent lightly used since the first-time rider needs:

1) A motorcycle that they can learn to be proficient on

2) Something that is dependable, safe, and runs correctly

3) A machine that can easily be resold or traded in when the rider learns what they really want to ride instead of what they thought they wanted to ride
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ok thanks dudes, looking into it more I think I'm gonna go with a new dual sport. I threw it up on another thread but I'm looking at the F700GS. I wouldn't cry too much if I drop it, it's got good performance and reliability. I plan on keeping it till the wheels fall off so I'm not too worried about depreciation. Still gonna get a cafe racer down the road for sure though ��
 

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Thruxton is pretty much the same as a Bonnie and my Bonnie has done 250000 K's not a problem so I think a Thruxton would be good . Good seen to the Cafe racer seen check out Cafe racer TV .
 
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