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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Sounds like you are progressing nicely. Don't lose that good habit you have of keeping an eye on what is going on around you. Lots of people get in the bad habit of being in neutal when stopped. Keep it in first with your clutch disengaged and keep an eye on what is happening behind you until you know for sure the car behind you is fully stopped and the car BEHIND him/her. This could save you one day.

Awesome choice for your first bike. I have thought of a newer Bonneville as an eventual replacement or second bike to go with this old girl.
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Aww that's a super nice bike. My friend has a Honda CB500 actually -- the body style for the 750 is very similar! And thank you -- I see a lot of riders on the road stop at a red light and go into neutral but I have always heard to stay in 1st as a JIC. I'll keep that in mind. :)))
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Thank you so much, everyone! The support on here is amazing lowered the bike this weekend by an inch -- which also "upgraded" the suspension. Now that it is an inch lower, I can flat foot it comfortably. Wow -- that makes such a difference. I took it to a parking lot again and definitely feel more in control of my bike. I have to work on throttle control more and not using my clutch as much in turns / cornering but for the most part, I can definitely see improvement and that's just from the 1" drop. I'll be going out and practicing a bit more today.

As for the suggestion of getting up at 5:30AM to practice -- I wake up at 5AM during the week so that's not an issue. My only concern is my neighbors don't like noise so I've been trying to wait until 8AM or so at least. You're right though -- it is much easier to practice when I'm not nervous about a bunch of traffic on the road. I'll probably do a bunch more neighborhood circle trips until I feel safe and confident enough to venture out in regular traffic and I'm not even pushing for high way stuff yet. Right now, to me, slow and steady wins the race.

If I think about it, I've really only been riding for 8 days at this point. Still have a lot of miles left to go! Thanks again, everyone!
 

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Cool!

I figured getting that seat height a little lower would do a world of good for you. :)

Can you imagine trying to start out on one of those tall adventure bikes? Wow, beautiful, functional rides but pretty unwieldy to start out on.

Clutch control and smooth inputs will go a long way to keep you upright and off of the ground. I got to heavy into the throttle on buddy's GS 450 back in the early 1990s. Rear wheel spun out from underneath me. Road rash and burn from the exhaust hurt more than my pride did. Good gear, going ATGATT, being super defensive, and smooth imputs are components of the formula for success.

The first gear with the clutch engaged is part of how I drive truck so it is automatic for me on the truck. Always keep an eye on your rear view mirrors when stopped and have an exit plan in place should some moron on his/her cell phone not be paying attention and be on their way to add your bike into their vehicle.

Glad to see you are progressing and feeling better about things. You learn more when things go wrong and you make a mistake. Keep progressing, keep improving, and keep having fun. Just don't get complacent when your skills get to a high level.


Thank you so much, everyone! The support on here is amazing lowered the bike this weekend by an inch -- which also "upgraded" the suspension. Now that it is an inch lower, I can flat foot it comfortably. Wow -- that makes such a difference. I took it to a parking lot again and definitely feel more in control of my bike. I have to work on throttle control more and not using my clutch as much in turns / cornering but for the most part, I can definitely see improvement and that's just from the 1" drop. I'll be going out and practicing a bit more today.

As for the suggestion of getting up at 5:30AM to practice -- I wake up at 5AM during the week so that's not an issue. My only concern is my neighbors don't like noise so I've been trying to wait until 8AM or so at least. You're right though -- it is much easier to practice when I'm not nervous about a bunch of traffic on the road. I'll probably do a bunch more neighborhood circle trips until I feel safe and confident enough to venture out in regular traffic and I'm not even pushing for high way stuff yet. Right now, to me, slow and steady wins the race.

If I think about it, I've really only been riding for 8 days at this point. Still have a lot of miles left to go! Thanks again, everyone!
 

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Hey guys. New female rider here. Reside in the Northern CA Bay Area. Just completed the MSF course this past weekend and passed. I was fine in the class, a little shaky on slow turns and u-turns but overall, I did fine. I already have my first bike -- a 2005 Triumph Bonneville T100.

I love it but it's definitely different than the GZ250 in the class. I took it out of my garage after the class and just rode up and down my condo development.

There is slight incline for a water drain and I was stopped, had the handlebars turned left and was trying to walk it backwards to turn it around to go straight again and ended up spilling. I felt so defeated dropping the bike. Overall, there wasn't much damage to myself or the bike -- just my ego.

Since then, I have been to a parking lot, with a friend, once and did fine after a few runs. I want to practice some more but am nervous about getting out on the street. I had a friend ride the bike over to the parking lot and then I got on and practiced. He said he thought I'd be fine to go on the street; he could see my muscle memory was already present and developing adequately. I opted not to as I haven't been on the street yet and didn't want to spill. Any tips for getting out there and getting over the nerves? Once I'm on and riding, I'm good but the initial mount and ride is still nerve racking. Not to mention, slow turns is still disconcerting.

Any advice is greatly appreciated. I'm sorry if I sound like a whimp...
Hello and welcome fellow female biker! Glad you took the course. It's a great resource and I feel a must when learning to ride a motorcycle. I have been riding for 14 years, and I started out, as you did, in my apartment parking lot where riding slowly I mastered because I had to learn it and practice it first, while watching out for crazies in a parking lot, kids playing etc. It was great for the slow riding and constant attention. So, I mastered riding slow and U-turns first thing. My husband would take me to the high school parking lot where we would set up cones and do some of the exercises we did for the MSF course. It was a short ride on the road to the parking lot, so that was fine. When I felt ready, my female mentor would take me out on the road, with her, for short trips. At some point, it was the highway then. Finally, when I did a grated bridge (and a long one), I felt so much more confident (that was a fear I had, the dreaded grated bridge!) My advise is take it slow, but don't be afraid to challenge yourself. Have a mentor/supporter with you. I slowly went over backing up my bike on an incline (my driveway from the garage is on a pain in the neck slight incline), but all this will come with experience and practice! Have confidence in yourself and the bike.
And enjoy the process!
 

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Welcome to Two-Wheelia! You've already made the biggest mistake you're liable to make as a new biker -- jumping immediately from a 250cc trainer to a bike weighing 50% more and possessing 3.5 times the horsepower! But relax -- the mistake is common, and CAN be overcome. You're doing well to consult those with experience, and we're glad to help out. All the advice rendered so far is sound, so I'll just say -- ride when, where and how YOU feel comfortable. In the beginning, you'll shy away from some situations, and rightfully so -- but you WILL grow accustomed to it. Always stay within your own capabilities, push the boundaries gently as your confidence grows, and gradually those capabilities will grow. Have fun!
 

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Both of you all posted to a thread from 2013...



Hello and welcome fellow female biker! Glad you took the course. It's a great resource and I feel a must when learning to ride a motorcycle. I have been riding for 14 years, and I started out, as you did, in my apartment parking lot where riding slowly I mastered because I had to learn it and practice it first, while watching out for crazies in a parking lot, kids playing etc. It was great for the slow riding and constant attention. So, I mastered riding slow and U-turns first thing. My husband would take me to the high school parking lot where we would set up cones and do some of the exercises we did for the MSF course. It was a short ride on the road to the parking lot, so that was fine. When I felt ready, my female mentor would take me out on the road, with her, for short trips. At some point, it was the highway then. Finally, when I did a grated bridge (and a long one), I felt so much more confident (that was a fear I had, the dreaded grated bridge!) My advise is take it slow, but don't be afraid to challenge yourself. Have a mentor/supporter with you. I slowly went over backing up my bike on an incline (my driveway from the garage is on a pain in the neck slight incline), but all this will come with experience and practice! Have confidence in yourself and the bike.
And enjoy the process!
Welcome to Two-Wheelia! You've already made the biggest mistake you're liable to make as a new biker -- jumping immediately from a 250cc trainer to a bike weighing 50% more and possessing 3.5 times the horsepower! But relax -- the mistake is common, and CAN be overcome. You're doing well to consult those with experience, and we're glad to help out. All the advice rendered so far is sound, so I'll just say -- ride when, where and how YOU feel comfortable. In the beginning, you'll shy away from some situations, and rightfully so -- but you WILL grow accustomed to it. Always stay within your own capabilities, push the boundaries gently as your confidence grows, and gradually those capabilities will grow. Have fun!
 

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Slow speed, nearly no speed drops are common. Without the gyroscopic effect of those rapidly spinning wheels, the dang 2-wheelers are happy to fall over. Might be clever to dress your new bike so that doesn't scar it up as you gain experience.

Do not let that get you afraid to ride it faster. A little bit of speed (30-50 mph) makes control come a whole lot easier. Obviously mistakes hurt more. So pay very close attention to your surroundings. Watch out for idiots. They are all out to get you.

From there, ride on. Enjoy the ride.
 

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Hey guys. New female rider here. Reside in the Northern CA Bay Area. Just completed the MSF course this past weekend and passed. I was fine in the class, a little shaky on slow turns and u-turns but overall, I did fine. I already have my first bike -- a 2005 Triumph Bonneville T100.

I love it but it's definitely different than the GZ250 in the class. I took it out of my garage after the class and just rode up and down my condo development.

There is slight incline for a water drain and I was stopped, had the handlebars turned left and was trying to walk it backwards to turn it around to go straight again and ended up spilling. I felt so defeated dropping the bike. Overall, there wasn't much damage to myself or the bike -- just my ego.

Since then, I have been to a parking lot, with a friend, once and did fine after a few runs. I want to practice some more but am nervous about getting out on the street. I had a friend ride the bike over to the parking lot and then I got on and practiced. He said he thought I'd be fine to go on the street; he could see my muscle memory was already present and developing adequately. I opted not to as I haven't been on the street yet and didn't want to spill. Any tips for getting out there and getting over the nerves? Once I'm on and riding, I'm good but the initial mount and ride is still nerve racking. Not to mention, slow turns is still disconcerting.

Any advice is greatly appreciated. I'm sorry if I sound like a whimp...
Sounds like me!! I’m a new female rider too!!
 
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