Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 51 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. New female rider here. Reside in the Northern CA Bay Area. Just completed the MSF course this past weekend and passed. I was fine in the class, a little shaky on slow turns and u-turns but overall, I did fine. I already have my first bike -- a 2005 Triumph Bonneville T100.

I love it but it's definitely different than the GZ250 in the class. I took it out of my garage after the class and just rode up and down my condo development.

There is slight incline for a water drain and I was stopped, had the handlebars turned left and was trying to walk it backwards to turn it around to go straight again and ended up spilling. I felt so defeated dropping the bike. Overall, there wasn't much damage to myself or the bike -- just my ego.

Since then, I have been to a parking lot, with a friend, once and did fine after a few runs. I want to practice some more but am nervous about getting out on the street. I had a friend ride the bike over to the parking lot and then I got on and practiced. He said he thought I'd be fine to go on the street; he could see my muscle memory was already present and developing adequately. I opted not to as I haven't been on the street yet and didn't want to spill. Any tips for getting out there and getting over the nerves? Once I'm on and riding, I'm good but the initial mount and ride is still nerve racking. Not to mention, slow turns is still disconcerting.

Any advice is greatly appreciated. I'm sorry if I sound like a whimp...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,010 Posts
welcome to the forum. there are definitely more women riders signing up here, and I also see them out on the street too. it's encouraging to see the trend.

"There is slight incline for a water drain and I was stopped, had the handlebars turned left and was trying to walk it backwards to turn it around to go straight again and ended up spilling. I felt so defeated dropping the bike. Overall, there wasn't much damage to myself or the bike -- just my ego.
"

DON'T worry about it. It happens. Pretty much everybody here has dropped a bike ... usually more then once. It's a lot easier to control a bike when you are duck walking, or walking beside it, if you apply the front brake. Use the front brake carefully when going backwards - it adds stability.

it sounds like you are fine. go hit the street EARLY in the morning before there is any traffic. put all your gear on, esp. your coat, helmet and boots. do some laps around your block. you will get the feel of the bike just fine.

some jitters while you are new and transitioning to the streets are perfectly normal. once you get over the nerves, everything will start clicking into gear. get back to us if you have specific questions.

dT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much, dT. I know it's just the nerves; even my friend said I just need to get out of my head. Once I focus on just riding, I'm fine. I always wear full gear (minus riding pants as I wear jeans) but I have the jacket with spine, shoulder and arm protectin, Shoei Helmet, gloves with knuckle protection and nice good boots. I just am nervous about going around the block and dropping the bike again, and not being able to get it back up. Any tips for if that happens?


Luckily, the area I live in, isn't very busy at any time of day if I just go around the block. It's near a school and it's summer so it's fairly quiet. I was thinking about going out early enough in the day to avoid any kind of crazy traffic prior to actually riding in traffic.

Unfortunately, I work different hours than most of my friends so there isn't always someone available who could help lift it if it dropped. :( I guess that's my primary concern.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
646 Posts
Ask and ye shall receive:


Don't forget to put the kickstand down first so that it doesn't just flop to the other side. If it falls on the left side you can use the same technique, you'll just need to be careful when you get it straightened up.
 

·
Very Famous Person
Joined
·
10,046 Posts
--

You can pad the places the bike will touch the ground with rubber hose, or rags, or use a large piece of carpet on the ground, and then it won't hurt to lay it down and practice picking it up both ways.

For that matter, you can leave the padding on the bike while you practice slow maneuvers in a parking lot and then not worry about dumping it there. This is as slow maneuvers are much harder than riding down the road. You should practice there for several hours per day, if you can, for the first couple of weeks. You'll never be too good at slow speed.

As to riding in traffic, just keep alert for what the cars nearby might do and be ready for evasive or protective action. After awhile, those observations will become natural and you will practice them even while not thinking about it.

--
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
Welcome to the forum jldeen!

Many of us have dropped their bikes - I felt the same as you when it happened to me :eek:. But in a way, it's good to get that out of the way.

I would just take it slow and easy - first ride around your complex, then take it out on some streets you know are not very well-traveled (I like the suggestion given here about riding in the early morning). Early Saturday and Sunday are good as well. You will get it all down soon enough! :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,637 Posts
Welcome. As for the drop, seriously, don't worry, your friend is right, get out of your head. Hell a few years ago I bought a brand new bike and dropped it from a stop on the way home. If you feel uncomfortable, practice more in your condo lot. You will have turns, stops, starts, etc.
 

·
Female Rider
Joined
·
9,310 Posts
Welcome to the Forum. From another female rider, I agree with the guys. I dropped my bike in our gravel driveway as I was dropping off the steep hill we have. Like Lance said, you got that out of the way. Practice when there is no traffic. Even if you only get 30 minutes at a time it is still practice. Take it slow & easy and you will succeed. Enjoy it in the process. That is the main reason most of us ride.
 

·
Very Famous Person
Joined
·
10,046 Posts
Welcome to the Forum. From another female rider, I agree with the guys. I dropped my bike in our gravel driveway as I was dropping off the steep hill we have. Like Lance said, you got that out of the way. Practice when there is no traffic. Even if you only get 30 minutes at a time it is still practice. Take it slow & easy and you will succeed. Enjoy it in the process. That is the main reason most of us ride.
--

I got my bike because I like to do maintenance on it. :wink:

--
 

·
Very Famous Person
Joined
·
10,046 Posts
If your weren't so ruff on it...Sliding it down a road is not Fun...:( But still so glad you are again able to ride!!! :) :) And do the maintenance for pleasure.
--

No, no! You misunderstand--it's my body that needs all the maintenance. The bike is there so I can move faster and more easily.

--
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
I didn't even make it out of the dealer parking lot before my first drop :eek:. Had the salesman ride it home for me, then spent the next couple of weeks out front of my house (live on a dead end) going through the friction zone, then turns etc. Then progressed to going around the block, down a very unbusy side street and so on until I was riding in full traffic.
I dropped my bike 2 1/2 times the first three months I had it, how did I get a 1/2 drop you ask? I only count a full drop if it touches the ground, the last one I was straddling it and kept it from going all the way down until my DH got over to help me pick it up, so I don't count that as a full drop :biggrin:.
 

·
Female Rider
Joined
·
9,310 Posts
Wasn't me, I swear...but I know someone who pulled up to a gas pump and got off to fuel up...ended up penned between gas pump & a Victory Vision. Forgot to put the kick stand down. And he would probably ban me from riding as a passenger if he knew I was telling this story. :) :) :) I think that too would count as a 1/2 drop...or just one of those duh moments. We had ridden about 600 miles that day so he really did have an excuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you guys, so much. Hearing all of your dropping stories makes me feel a little more at ease about the whole situation. I'm going to try to go on a short practice ride a little later today and see how that goes. When I managed to get out of my head in the parking lot the other day and just ride -- it felt great. I was cornering and going over speed bumps and everything.

I still have to remember to look through the turn or I take it too wide which worries me in traffic for obvious reasons. And I'm still shaky at stopping but practice makes perfect.

Thanks again guys. I really love how friendly and supportive the motorcycle world has been. :)))
 

·
Very Famous Person
Joined
·
10,046 Posts
--

Don't forget that "looking trough a turn" means that you look where you want to go and AIM in that direction. The reason you take it too wide in traffic is because you are looking at the cars you don't want to run into instead of the path you want to take.

--
 

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
4,623 Posts
Ask and ye shall receive:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k4MPyX0QCYw

Don't forget to put the kickstand down first so that it doesn't just flop to the other side. If it falls on the left side you can use the same technique, you'll just need to be careful when you get it straightened up.
This is great and all but what do you do if the bike falls on the kickstand side? Guess you'd have to be very carefull so it doesn't fall over the other way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Baby Steps

As another new female rider - baby steps is the key,

first week- car park (very close to home, so minor streets to it but unusual to see a car moving), then
second week next short ride with hubby around the local streets,
third week 20 miles on major streets to sailing club and back,
fourth week anywhere but freeway alone and together
Now - 70 miles freeways, curves, railway tracks and everything - even hill starts with lights (I live near the beach no many hills)

With each new step make sure you are challenged but not freaked - ride at your comfort level.

And remember it is fun :thumbsup:
 
1 - 20 of 51 Posts
Top