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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 650 Yamaha Crusier as my first bike, I'm in my early 50's and thought what the hell. Now I'm thinking too much too soon, not sure. Not too confident, however I am keen to learn, is it a matter of time, or should one be a natural at rinding
 

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Like many things, proficiency comes with practice. The 650 you have is a decent motorcycle to learn on.

I would recommend taking the beginner's riding course if you haven't already. It will put you way ahead in learning to ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, - patients is the key. I have my learners, however what I had trained on was much light, and easier to handle.
 

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Welcome to the Forum. I agree with both Dods and Eye, take the BRC, they teach you so much. We all had to learn so if you have any problems some of us have probably had them too. Good Luck to you!
 

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Welcome. And I would also add once you take BRC 1 you may want to take BRC 2. Here BRC 2 requires you use your own bike in that one which should help you out.
 

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Welcome from Seattle :)

I also concur with everyone...take the BRC. You can learn so much in a day or two that cannot be replaced. And take it easy on yourself. The people you see that "make it look so easy" have been riding for a long time. You can ride like that one day too, but it doesn't happen overnight. Small successes add up to good experience.
 

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the key is to be comfortable i myself was comfortable with a 1100 shadow but i am also a big boy and can handle the weight, then the more i rode the easier it got so take some time and become one with the bike
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for your support it is really encouraging. I take my hat off to all you riders it's not that easy. Wouldn't it be great if all drivers were able to experience a little bit on a motorbike, they would understand and appreciates bikes a lot more
 

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Where are you from Girltec? Do you live in the city or rural area?

I rode when I was a kid and then didn't ride again until 2005. I only got to ride that summer, hurt my back and didn't get to ride again until 2012. I ride a 1985 Yamaha Maxim 700 which weighs around 500 lbs. I felt I really needed a refresher to build my confidence so I took the BRC. It really gave me my confidence back.

I still wasn't great but I was ready to ride to a parking lot to practice. I live in a rural area and was able to ride some on a 4 lane country road with not too much traffic. I kept practicing and feel that every time I ride I get more experience which keeps building confidence. Hang in there and practice, practice practice.
 

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Thank you all for your support it is really encouraging. I take my hat off to all you riders it's not that easy. Wouldn't it be great if all drivers were able to experience a little bit on a motorbike, they would understand and appreciates bikes a lot more
In a perfect world. However, in reality, cars are not looking for you, they will not see you, so l always assume l am invisible.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Look at my logon ID, I am an old man.
Here goes. Please take the effort to enroll in the basic riding course, BRC, where you live. I took it for the first time a few years back and graduated on my 60th birthday. I had been riding since I was 18 but found things to learn even after all of that time riding.
A 650 is a nice light beginner bike that can teach you a lot. Hang in there and learn what you can on that bike. It will serve you well when/if you decide to go with a larger bike.
Perhaps the hardest thing to learn is to relax. If you freeze up on the controls when passing an 18 wheeler you will have far more trouble than I do. I relax and let the bike work with me instead of fighting it. By their very nature a bike will do a lot to keep you out of real trouble. An early learning should be to begin to trust the bike. It will help you overcome many many difficulties.
 

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I remember the day I brought my first bike. A 96 Savage 650. I was like, well, how hard can it be. After all I've ridden mopeds and ten speeds all my life. I'll ride this baby to work tonight. Hell, I didn't even make it out of the driveway and the guys where chasing me yelling, pull in the clutch, pull the clutch!!! As I was just about ready to go screaming across a busy roadway. The second time I got on it, well, I dumped it. Got up, said every curse word, even made up a few and swore I'd never get back on it. 15 minutes later, I was back at her. The hardest part for me was learning to pull the clutch and work the brakes at the same time. I decided to take the engine out of the equation. I learned how to clutch and brake just by starting on a downward incline. That gave me the confidence to turn the bike around and head back up the hill with the motor running. After that, it was short trips around the hood just getting used to the bike. It took a few months of learning, and I'm still learning new things.

I say go for it. You are going to make some mistakes. That's ok, as long as they aren't deadly mistakes and you learn from them. Take baby steps. We all had to start off that way. Learn to balance the bike first, then braking is the next thing you need to learn. Once you know how to brake in an emergency, the speed will pick up and your confidence will roar. Good luck!!!
 

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And the best advice I can give, is ride your own ride. Don't ride to impress anyone. Ride at a speed that you feel comfortable with. If the cars behind you get impatient, pull over and let them pass. Always keep your eyes on the vehicles around you. they can and will pull out in front of you. You need to anticipate it and react accordingly.
 

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Now I'm thinking too much too soon, not sure. Not too confident, however I am keen to learn, is it a matter of time, or should one be a natural at rinding
I did the same thing. I bought a Honda Magna right after getting my license, but it was too big/heavy and powerful for me. I never really felt like I was in control. I only had the BRC under my belt and zero experience elsewhere. I ended up selling it and getting a TU250x, which is a much better fit for me. I'm not saying that's the answer for you, but you're definitely not the only one to feel that way. Welcome and good luck.
 

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Welcome to the forum Girltec! Everybody starts somewhere and you can learn on a bigger bike - just take your time and build hours.
 

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Should one strong and easy bike to learn, you might long way to learn but sure it worth until you are fully comfortable and confident.
 

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And the best advice I can give, is ride your own ride.


Great advice Zippy. I've been riding for 6 years and I can count on one hand how many times I've ridden with others. An exception is when your on the interstate and tag along with other bikers on my route. I can concentrate more and enjoy the ride. I'm not against riding with others, just turns out that way most times.
 
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