Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im a junior in high school looking for my first bike. I have a budget of about $2800 and I was thinking about getting a 1-2 year old Grom or z125, or a 5-10 year old Ninja or CBR. I heard that the 125 bikes arent great to start on bc they can’t go on the freeway, but i am not good with mechanical things so i am concerned about the reliability issues of a bike that is a little older. Im a newbie at this so any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
Wish I'd started riding while still in High School, but instead waited until just after my 30 year reunion. But we do have one thing in common... mechanical inclination (or lack of). For that reason I opted for new over used.

How important is it to be no the freeway? If it's a requirement then a 125 won't meet your need so it shouldn't even be considered. If it's a nice-to-have then it's possibly a better choice since it sounds like you don't have a of extra cash for repairs/maintenance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wish I'd started riding while still in High School, but instead waited until just after my 30 year reunion. But we do have one thing in common... mechanical inclination (or lack of). For that reason I opted for new over used.

How important is it to be no the freeway? If it's a requirement then a 125 won't meet your need so it shouldn't even be considered. If it's a nice-to-have then it's possibly a better choice since it sounds like you don't have a of extra cash for repairs/maintenance.
Freeway riding isn’t very important to me. It would be nice, but i mostly just was a bike that i get ride around town/to school.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,287 Posts
First, welcome!

Buying a bike gives you three options regarding mechanical issues:

1. You have enough money to not worry about learning how to fix/repair anything because you can afford to have someone else take care of it.
2. You do not have much money and are willing to research/ask questions about how to fix things or do basic maintenance on your own.
3. You do not have much money and don't care to learn and will stop riding when your bike stops running.

Not being good with mechanical things is something I have to overcome every time I pick up a tool! :smile_big: It can be overcome with practice, a willingness to learn, and patience. YT is a great resource for learning everything from basic maintenance to very involved jobs.

As for which size bike, I'd lean towards a 250/300 (Ninja/R3/CBR group) just for the flexibility of being able to ride on faster roads as you gain experience. Used prices are not much, if any, more than what folks are asking for a Grom... at least in my area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
First, welcome!

Buying a bike gives you three options regarding mechanical issues:

1. You have enough money to not worry about learning how to fix/repair anything because you can afford to have someone else take care of it.
2. You do not have much money and are willing to research/ask questions about how to fix things or do basic maintenance on your own.
3. You do not have much money and don't care to learn and will stop riding when your bike stops running.

Not being good with mechanical things is something I have to overcome every time I pick up a tool!
It can be overcome with practice, a willingness to learn, and patience. YT is a great resource for learning everything from basic maintenance to very involved jobs.

As for which size bike, I'd lean towards a 250/300 (Ninja/R3/CBR group) just for the flexibility of being able to ride on faster roads as you gain experience. Used prices are not much, if any, more than what folks are asking for a Grom... at least in my area.
Thanks! I am definitely willing to learn. Im just a little bit nervous about possibly getting stuck with a piece of junk 250/300 at my price point. I had a similar incident happen with a craigslist car so im trying to be super careful now lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,287 Posts
Thanks! I am definitely willing to learn. Im just a little bit nervous about possibly getting stuck with a piece of junk 250/300 at my price point. I had a similar incident happen with a craigslist car so im trying to be super careful now lol.
I get it! Nice thing about bikes is that it is much easier than a car to see if anything is jacked up on it. Again, YT has some great instructional vids on how to check out a bike before buying. At your price point, I'd say there should be plenty out there in very nice shape. Take your time and do your research and you should be fine!

I've gone to many CL showings only to be shocked at how much worse the item looks live. My polite out is "Thanks for letting me take a look. I've got a few more I'm looking at but I'll be in touch if I decide to buy your "whatever"...
 

·
Moderator - Loves All Motorcycles
Joined
·
1,251 Posts
Honestly I would go for the 250.

The Grom and its competitors are fun little bikes to ride on and just big/fast enough to be good learners. However, I would not buy one unless you specifically want one.

The reason for this is that you'll grow out of your "learning" bike really fast and may come to not like the slowness of a 125. A 250 sportbike can often get you to 90mph and sometimes past 100mph. 125s cruise at 45 and fully tucked you'll be lucky to break 65.

I've seen new riders get 125s as easy bikes to learn on then hate them after a couple months as their skill had quickly surpassed the abilities of their bikes.

That said, Groms do hold their value well so if you don't drop it you can sell it for what you paid for it. So even if you do go 125 it's not like you're forever stuck with it. You also get the added benefit of fuel injection (provided you don't go for a Chinese bike) which means less tuning, more riding.

A benefit of an old "cheaper by the dozen" 250 is that even if you drop it you'll be able to sell it for what you paid. And since they're like roaches they last forever and parts are cheap on Craigslist and eBay.

Some backstory on myself: I just turned 26 and got my license back in June. I bought a Buell Blast (500 single) and a Honda Rebel (250 twin) as my first two bikes. I got bored with them and sold them both a month later. Ignoring my Chinese scooters, my youngest bike is a 1982 Suzuki GS 850. Maintenance on the old beast is actually easier than it sounds and I've learned a lot. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Take the MSF Course. Standard state courses are done on 125s (or, they used to be). Harley dealers give you the class on a 500. Either way, you'll learn how not to kill yourself in the first week and gain some perspective on bikes.

The cost is minimal for how much better you will make your decision.
 

·
So long
Joined
·
2,739 Posts
Thanks! I am definitely willing to learn. Im just a little bit nervous about possibly getting stuck with a piece of junk 250/300 at my price point. I had a similar incident happen with a craigslist car so im trying to be super careful now lol.
You won't get stuck with a piece of junk if you have the CL seller meet you at a professional shop to have the bike inspected.

Personally I'd go with a lightly used 250/300. They'll have better resale and are in more demand.

Good luck.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top