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Discussion Starter #1
The other day l was approaching a freeway onramp, one of those deals where there are like 4 lanes but only the far left lane can turn left. I was rolling up to a stop and this older man in a flashy new car just started drifting into me from the left. I laid into my horn as he backed off, then threw his hands up in the air and floored it to get ahead of me. Yes, l admit it...l gave him the middle finger. Not a simple little salute, more of a bony-fingered old Canadian trucker salute. He rolled down his window and l lifted my face shield.

Me: You never even looked!!!

Him: I don't need to look, l had my blinker on!


There you have it folks. I had my blinker on, therefore it is your job to see me. There really are people out there like this. Stay safe, and keep your eyes peeled
 
C

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To some degree he is right. Even though we both know it is wrong. But it is the way things are when we ride. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Oh, don't get me wrong...l wasn't like, "How come you didn't see me?" But he never looked and acted like he was fully entitled to just come on over because his blinker was on. This level of inconsideration for those around you is troubling, and it seems to be everywhere
 
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No never got you wrong, Hawk. But is just the way things are when we ride. Because you are good rider, you were able to flip him off. Which in a way is a good and bad thing. lol :)

I do see your point of view and stance on this, but that is what happened and something similar will happen again so keep your eyes peeled.
 

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No matter the injustice, I am not an advocate for flipping people off. It doesn't speak well of us, nor our motorcycle community.

That said, I "get" why you were upset. He SHOULD be "looking" at all times, and wasn't.

I've made the mistake of not looking, even as recently as a day or so ago, when on a four lane road, I tried to move over from the left lane to the right lane, only to find that there was a soccer mom in her mini van (who wasn't there a minute ago, and was obviously in a great deal of "hurry up") along side me. She beeped, and I moved back quickly.

Was the "soccer mom" in too much of a hurry? Perhaps. Should I have checked my blind spot mirror and not just my right rear mirror, absolutely. We were both, "in the wrong."

"Accidents" happen because we all make multiple decisions very quickly in our normal driving day. Most of the time they are good and rational decisions, but every once and a while, a bone-head move happens. What we do with that, after the fact, is the kicker. The guy in the car didn't make the right choice by choosing to speed up to pass, (unless there was some oncoming vehicle behind him that would have rear-ended him if he hadn't done so).

-Soupy
 

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Trying to convince someone on the road that they made a mistake is nearly futile. Many would never admit it, even to themselves. I don't waste energy on it.

Keeping a sharp eye for potential idiocy and placing yourself in the safest position to react properly to it is the best strategy.
 

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Yep. I have to agree. The biggest tool we own that will help us prevent accidents is our own eyes. It's our job to look out for them, cause they sure won't look out for us. Not everyone is like that though. On my ride the other day I had a gentleman who had plenty of time to pull in front of me to get into his driveway, but played it safe and waited for me to go by. Those people, I wave to and thank. I have also changed my cage driving since riding. Before picking up riding, I did not understand what riders went through. I was the one that was always tossing ciggy butts out the window. I won't do that now, cause I now how it feels to have a butt tossed at you. Maybe if everyone in the world had to take the BRC, they would understand what it's like for us. But, if we want them to respect us, we need to respect them. Respect is earned.
 

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Bash

I believe Jack Nichalson used a Big Bertha type driver, and pounded on the hood of some poor guys car.
Pleased you encounter did not cause any damage.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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hawkaholic37 said:
bony-fingered old Canadian trucker salute
That's poetry right there.:icon_cool: Good job keeping your head on a swivel.

There are times when non verbal communication is the best. I do not take flipping the bird lightly, but sometimes that is the quickest and most direct language.
2 hand signals are almost universally understood immediately (at least in the North America)
1. the two fingered "peace sign" connoting, "thanks" or "good job"

2. and the "middle finger" connoting, "Hey you almost killed me, pull you head out of your ass!"

Both should be used judicially and with equal measure to both reward and chastise.
 

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Unfortunately in most cases a driver just needs to say "I didn't see them" to get away with running into a biker, if that is the case how does any child riding a much smaller bicycle in the street live to see another birthday? Anything you have to do to wake some dumb!## up is necessary to your survival or the rest of us. Next time give the fist raised forearm straight up bent elbow with other arm at crux of elbow salute, most people understand that one.
 

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I think Soupy nailed it.

The issue is ... making many decisions in a short period of time. There are quite a lot of drivers out there who are a FAIL at this skill. Either because they are too lazy to try, or because they really CAN'T do it. The guy in the OP (the driver) sounds likes someone who cannot actually make multiple decisions ... especially in a short time period. So he basically just puts on his blinker and changes lanes. YES, ITS INSANITY. In L.A., he wouldn't survive very long!!!

dT
 

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Happened to me yesterday,a group of us were changing lanes and I was the last one in the pack.Everybody starts moving over when out of nowhere a woman come FLYING up to us from behind and cuts me off from the pack,I was watching my mirror but didn't see her until I looked over my shoulder.Gave her one of those WTF looks and rolled on.You can't cure stupid and unfortunately it is a very common disease.
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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Sometimes, older drivers become easily disoriented and aren't even sure which lane they're in. Last summer I was rolling into a town with four lanes, no median. An old lady coming towards me pulled into my lane (inside lane) as if it were a turn lane and sat there with her turn signal blinking for a left turn, waiting for traffic to clear (someone was in the right lane next to me). I had to come to a complete stop. She looked at me like why didn't I go on by? I held my arms out like "What!" and she finally turned. The next on coming driver grinned and looked at me like "What the heck was that?"
 

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Sometimes, older drivers become easily disoriented and aren't even sure which lane they're in. Last summer I was rolling into a town with four lanes, no median. An old lady coming towards me pulled into my lane (inside lane) as if it were a turn lane and sat there with her turn signal blinking for a left turn, waiting for traffic to clear (someone was in the right lane next to me). I had to come to a complete stop. She looked at me like why didn't I go on by? I held my arms out like "What!" and she finally turned. The next on coming driver grinned and looked at me like "What the heck was that?"
There comes a time when the license needs to be given up before someone gets hurt.
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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There comes a time when the license needs to be given up before someone gets hurt.
Agreed. I knew my mother was slipping and becoming unsafe, but she was very independent (as are many elder drivers) AND stubborn. At first, we got her convinced to quit night driving and out of town, but when a couple of her friends reported she was routinely going through red lights, we sold her car. She was actually relieved to not have to worry about driving anymore.

Edited to add... when we first confronted mom about her driving she went down to the DMV. They retested and pronounced her good to go!
 

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As my Dad ages (he's now 83) I notice that some of the bad habits that he has had for many years, are now more pronounced.

For example, as good a driver as he truly is, he has had a bad habit of sorta rolling thru intersections, as if he "has the right of way, no matter what." His personality is very giving and passive most of the time, but in the car, it's as if he forgets that. He's not aggressive in his driving, but he's not as careful as he should be, and is not as dedicated to the rules as he should be.

His growing lack of hearing and his slowing reaction times, concern me, and the obvious concern is that I would hate to see him hurt himself, my mother, or anyone else, by his own lack of fully complying to the laws.

Am "I" perfect? No. I have my own bad habits that I try to keep in check when I drive. So I'll point the finger at myself as well.

In my Fathers case, I'd rather see him LOSE his License and be safe, than keep it, and get killed. There are multiple times more cars, trucks and bikes on the road these days, and they are a LOT more aggressive than they used to be. That "me first, you second" mindset is pervasive and not isolated to the young folks.

-Soupy
 

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My mother-in-law at 91 gave up her license voluntarily the last time my wife visited and questioned her driving. She had begun driving much slower. We were worried as she is ferociously independent. Luckily no battle.
 

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My grams was in her 90's when she gave up driving, and only because she could no longer get in and out of the car. As she aged, she drove more like Mario Andretti, she was our little speed demon. As long as you stay as far away from her when she was in reverse, that's the only thing she had problems with. My dad is 82, still very active and very independant, looking at him he looks like 60. But he scares the pants out of us driving. He was always a good driver, but I think he's in denial about having sight issues. He'd beat the crap out of us if we brought up the subject of him giving up driving...
 

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True about the elderly but there are a bunch of no driving sons a /&@$! out there that are not.Yesterday I was at the drive thru at Mickey d's and looked over just in time to see some jack wagon that did not want to wait for the light so he decided to just back down the street and cut thru a parking lot only problem was that there was a guy on a Kawi behind him and he backed over him.Thank God the guy wasn't hurt!They are EVERYWHERE!!!
 

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Trying to convince someone on the road that they made a mistake is nearly futile. Many would never admit it, even to themselves. I don't waste energy on it.

Keeping a sharp eye for potential idiocy and placing yourself in the safest position to react properly to it is the best strategy.
Yep.

And I'd rather old and forgetting than young and not knowing. At least the old one may get by on experience that's turned into something like instinct.
 
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