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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just wanted to share, get it off my chest.
I have been riding for about half a year now, and i realise now that i have been too sure of my skills as a rider and i need to chill and practice more.
Last saturday i had my first time i almost caused a accident i was going through a corner i know like the back of my hand, going faster than i probs should have, but in normal circumstanses i would have been perfectly fine.
This time the outer half was covered in gravel. I was lucky to see it early since my reaction was to stand the bike up and break. I slowed down to a walking speed right before the asphalt ended and turned the bike back into the corner, riding the short distance back home shaking.
I realise that right now this was especially dumb with COVID. I will for sure ride slower and more cautiously from now on.
Thank you for reading this. I just needed to say this to someone.
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It happens. It's easy to start believing you're better than you actually are when you ride for a period of time and nothing bad happens.

I kind of have the opposite problem. I'll be going around a curve, some little thing upsets my line and I wobble through like a drunk. I think as many years as I've been riding, I should be better than this! :mad:
 

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Turns still make me nervous and everyone picks on me for it. I have no problem doing 100+ on straights but Every time I go into a deep corner I slow down to basically a walk. I’m getting alittle better but I just have this fear of leaning too far and dumping it.
 

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American Legion Rider
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It was a S-turn that wiped me out and when I started riding again I had to force myself to just ride like I always did. I'm still trying to do that. So I truly understand where you are. Pat yourself on the back for spotting the gravel and getting things slowed down enough to get around that curve. There are many that would get target fixation and end up off the road completely. So you did good and hopefully this just another circumstance that you'll keep in the back of your mind on all future curves. Certain times of the year, gravel or sand on roads in curves is much worse and this is one of those time of years, spring. But any heavy rains can do the same. You are just adding to your experiences. You'll soon be back to pushing the envelope again. My wreck was in 012 and I still have to force myself to aggressively take curves. But I really don't want another 70mph crash. Those suckers are a pain.:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :D :D :D
 

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On The Road Again!
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Any ride that you don't learn something from is a wasted ride.
Congrats! You learned something!
Keep the shiny side up!
 

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Visionary
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Sounds like you manged the situation and learned from it. Count this as a win and ride on as a wiser rider.
 

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I've been riding for about 35 years now and I'm still learning. Every once in awhile something happens which brings me back to reality, reminding me to be a bit more conservative in my riding. The other day I was approaching an intersection and admittedly doing about 55 in a 45 zone, when the traffic light started to change. My inclination was to twist the throttle and make it through as quickly as possible, but just then a pickup towing a trailer jumped the green on the cross street forcing me to brake REALLY hard. My Goldwing as decent brakes and has ABS, but I came very close to not being able to stop in time to avoid an accident. It reminded me that I have not had to emergency brake in a very long time and I was getting more than a bit complacent about my skills in doing so. I take it as a good sign that I was close, but OK, and that it provided a good reminder to practice basic skills and stay alert at all times. Glad you survived your close call, and that you are not letting it scare you into not riding.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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You rode into a corner, saw a problem, reacted and safely completed the turn. Could you had done something different? Who knows, you were the only one there. The thing is you reacted and didn't panic. That in itself is what a rider needs to learn. See, react, don't panic, complete the action,
 

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Don't beat yourself up too much. Sounds like you did the right thing (like Critter pointed out). Whenever I have a close call like that, I replay everything in my mind after the event and analyze the mistakes I made to try to learn from them so it doesn't happen again. Most accidents are a series of events that happen one after the other. It's usually not one single thing that causes the accident. For example, a rider was going too fast into a corner (mistake # 1), and he/she didn't notice the patch of gravel (mistake # 2), and he/she hadn't practiced their swerving/braking skills in many months so wasn't able to avoid it (mistake # 3), and he/she was at the end of a 3-hour ride and didn't take enough breaks so was pretty tired (mistake # 4)...I could go on...hopefully, you get the picture.

Anyway, I'm a returning rider just like you. I've been riding for 18 months (9,800 miles) and have definitely made more than a few mistakes. But, like I said, replay them in your mind and think about what you could have done differently so the next time you run into the same situation you'll be better prepared. Good luck and be safe!
 

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Last couple days I've been getting a good deal of saddle time. Just running around trying to get one thing after another done and I've been riding the bike because "A" the weather is good and "B" its more fun than driving the truck.

Yesterday I was coming back from town taking the same way back as I had rode out on. I had only been out a few hours but apparently a tree or a/some tree limbs had fallen on the road while I was gone. The bigger stuff had all been kicked/tossed/ thrown off the road but there was a lot of small debris near the end of this curve to the right.

This time everything just clicked in place, hit the brakes, saw my path through the mess, downshifted one or two gears, (don't remember which), swerved a bit harder to the right, then back left, and through it, and, and,...there was no one around to see it.

But I know it.

It will get better, and maybe no one will notice, but you will.
 

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It does feel good when things just click into place like you know what you are doing and don't have a care in the world. Glad it worked, this time. Every encounter like that is different. (y) (y) (y)
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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If you have to think about it, it is already too late. If you get through it and then have to think about what you did - you are doing it right.
 

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Riding half a year and knew what to do? Did it correctly and instinctively with no panic? You Sir, can ride with me anytime! Yes you're still new to riding, but you have the right instincts. Years ago (like 45 years) when I was a know it all hot shot, I hit a turn about 30 mph over 'reasonable'. It was a blind turn and I didn't see the gravel in my path. I couldn't correct, as I was committed, and low sided off the road. All I had on was a T shirt, Levis and my 'hat'. Believe it or not, even with the low side, I was doing all right with my sudden slide.....until I hit the barbed wire fence. To this day, I still have the scares on my back after sliding down that fence for about 20 feet. Some people ask why I don't have any tattoos. I've always said I've never paid for a scar. I EARN mine. LOL.

You're doing good Amigo. Don't worry about it, learn, and ride on.

And no disrespect to members that have tattoos. It just ain't my thing.
 
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