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Discussion Starter #1
So iv got a 2000 cbr600F4 it's lost spark but my question is when I test two different coils they both give off 11.58 volts is this correct or is my ECU buggered
 

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So why do you think the ECU is "buggered" and not the battery? In my garage, when I get a reading of 12v or less, the battery is toast. But that's here. Not sure what that means where you are.
 

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So why do you think the ECU is "buggered" and not the battery? In my garage, when I get a reading of 12v or less, the battery is toast. But that's here. Not sure what that means where you are.

  1. It has a Brand new battery I had someone watch me test the coils an they said the second one I tested number 3 btw shouldn't be reading the same as first one I tested witch was number 4
 

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It has a Brand new battery
A new battery should be reading over 13v. A battery is dead at 12v. Did you charge this new battery or just stick it in and start riding or trying to ride? Every new battery needs to be brought up to full charge before using it. Sometimes retailers do that but not always. So what's the history of this new battery. And by the way, a new battery can be bad right from the get go. Won't take a charge.
 

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  1. The battery is like less than month old it was dead when I got back from Xmas so I just hooked it up to a running car, then I did the tests on coils with ignition on (ready to start). The bike was running mint just didn't start one morning now has no spark, bit stuck on it tbh, iv also recently relocated my ECU to under my air filter witch may of cooked it
 

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  1. The battery is like less than month old it was dead when I got back from Xmas so I just hooked it up to a running car, then I did the tests on coils with ignition on (ready to start). The bike was running mint just didn't start one morning now has no spark, bit stuck on it tbh, iv also recently relocated my ECU to under my air filter witch may of cooked it
Connecting a small motorcycle battery to a running car will kill it, and fast, from too much charge current. NEVER use a running car or truck to power a motorcycle battery! You may already need a new battery.

Just how and at what terminals are you testing the coils? A coil's (+) low tension terminal is connected to the battery on one side, through the ignition switch, and the other low tension terminal to the ECU (or points) that briefly switches that one to ground. When that switch is turned off, a spark is generated. For most coils, the high tension terminal (the one that goes to the spark plug) may read close to battery Voltage when not making a spark, because it is connected to the (+) terminal internally; however, there is a lot of fine wire between that terminal and the (+) terminal, so the meter itself may lower that Voltage, due to the resistance of that wire and the amount of current the meter uses to take the measurement. For this reason, measuring the Voltage at the high tension terminal is not very useful, as it may, or may not, vary between coils, except it shows it is, in fact, connected; there is also the possibility of a spark, which could damage the meter.
 

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Connecting a small motorcycle battery to a running car will kill it, and fast, from too much charge current. NEVER use a running car or truck to power a motorcycle battery! You may already need a new battery.

Just how and at what terminals are you testing the coils? A coil's (+) low tension terminal is connected to the battery on one side, through the ignition switch, and the other low tension terminal to the ECU (or points) that briefly switches that one to ground. When that switch is turned off, a spark is generated. For most coils, the high tension terminal (the one that goes to the spark plug) may read close to battery Voltage when not making a spark, because it is connected to the (+) terminal internally; however, there is a lot of fine wire between that terminal and the (+) terminal, so the meter itself may lower that Voltage, due to the resistance of that wire and the amount of current the meter uses to take the measurement. For this reason, measuring the Voltage at the high tension terminal is not very useful, as it may, or may not, vary between coils, except it shows it is, in fact, connected; there is also the possibility of a spark, which could damage the meter.
I tested the two wires on the coil it has stick coils btw the battery shouldn't matter iv had it on car a many many times an never hurt it an it's not a cheapy either it's the biggest bike one you can buy
 

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Are you measuring the connector that mates the coils with it unplugged, or piercing the wires to measure?

A stick coil is the same as any other; it just goes directly onto the plug, so no HT lead. It still has to have a current charge through the primary winding to make a spark. Conventional ignition would have +V on one input, and a momentary ground on the other to provide the charge. Unless your ECU uses capacitive discharge, which charges a large capacitor to about 300V then blasts it through the coil; because if that high Voltage, true C-D ignition is pretty rare, though. So, conventionally, the two wires would be the (+) power from the battery via the key switch (and possibly through the ECU), and the other directly to the ECU, which should be about the same Voltage as the (+) power until the ECU grounds it to charge the coil to make a spark. Unplugged, that wire may still be at battery Voltage, as it depends on the design of the ECU.

What I'm saying is, you may measure the same Voltage on both wires with it plugged in, even if the coil is bad. If you swap a known good coil and still get no spark, the ECU or the wires between it and the coil could be bad, but you may need more test equipment to find out.

By the way, MC batteries usually can't take more than a few Amps charging current, no matter how big the bike is. My 900 pound Valkyrie has a 14Ah battery, and charge current more than 5 or so Amps will damage it. A running car can easily force in several times that, if the battery is discharged. The damage adds up, so you get away with it a few times, until the battery quits working; the only way to know if yours is damaged is to have it tested. A fully charged battery is well above 12V, as noted above, even with the lights on; if it drops that much after a full, slow charge, it is beginning to fail.
 

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Hey guys I'm the dad lol I can try explain a bit of how I'm testing this f4,first off the bike was sweet and tidy brought as parts for my custom sc24 but I decided it was too decent to pull down so gave to the boy who after not listening to 38 yes riding experience tried riding in a new road fast(we all know it's in slow ,out fast on new roads) well he got acquainted with a bridge so new frame and custom rear that done I test ride it from taihape to new plymouth (approx 450km return)the bike seemed to suffer fuel issues after about 1km so I fitted new lines filter and eventually even a pump it was better but still hanging up at 115kmh,I replaced the custom muffler with the aracovich it had before crash and tested on a 10km test it was much better but still light miss top end(have found a leaky pipe on the left most carb,it joins a pipe from right most carb to air box,which may have caused that miss)anyway it completed the test ok and was parked outside,it pissed down,next day went to use and it just wound over I guessed no spark,pulled it's relays and wiring boxes found the bigger box (steel in rubber cover with blue plug mount with 5 wires)was full of water I pulled apart and dried it refitted ,when key gets turned on it clicks as I'd expect,I pulled a plug earthed it no spark on crank over,changed coil stick and feed wire still no spark, upon volt test the black /white(commen wire on all 4 coils also on the wet box) wire reads full boot equal to battery charge I expected the wire from the ECU to be nil as I thought that was a pulse feed to say now coil do your thing(had read I couldn't check it much as pulse be to fast for my digital gauge)but it's equal to battery as well still no spark,to add I have found the fuel pump power supply is also dead so for tests I direct feed it from battery but no pop crackle or snap still,I'm earthing the plug via a jumper cable so can hold the plug while looking,no chance im missing it.im about to test for volt difference from the wet box after key gets turned on(does that box feed the ECU main power supply as well ,I think I recall it supply's the crash fuel cut relay but dunno as haven't built this one a new loom yet) 1,,can I test the ECU to coil feed with a bulb in the feed line to show if pulsing while wound? ,2,,can I supply the ECU direct to bypass the rest of the loom and accessories to test it is still working?,,,side notes the battery tho bit flat is near new and out of my 1000,I'm testing the coils by inserting the probe in the rear of plug while it's connected to the coil still,I have tested all its coil feeds this way all are equal to battery current level,the loom and accessories have been relocated but not trimmed and the r/r unit is earthed to a good sized alloy heat sink from a Apple iMac under the seat(very open area),I'm short of time to spare on it atm and appreciate any ideas or thoughts on this
 

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WintrSol is giving good advice but what we are both concerned with is whether you have a good battery anymore. You state you are getting less than 12v and a good battery should be no less than 12.5v. Connecting to a car battery is okay as long as you don't start the car and it isn't clear if the car has been running at any time or not as that can and will fry a battery. Everything else you've stated is irrelevant unless you start with a battery of at least 12.5v. WintrSol is much better at this so I advise you to read his posts again but start with a good battery at full charge or at least 12.5 since full charge is more like 13.5 and it isn't clear you have the means to do that if you are using a car battery in conjunction with the motorcycle battery. In fact you may have cooked the ECU doing so. Some how we all need to get on the same page if that makes sense.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
WintrSol is giving good advice but what we are both concerned with is whether you have a good battery anymore. You state you are getting less than 12v and a good battery should be no less than 12.5v. Connecting to a car battery is okay as long as you don't start the car and it isn't clear if the car has been running at any time or not as that can and will fry a battery. Everything else you've stated is irrelevant unless you start with a battery of at least 12.5v. WintrSol is much better at this so I advise you to read his posts again but start with a good battery at full charge or at least 12.5 since full charge is more like 13.5 and it isn't clear you have the means to do that if you are using a car battery in conjunction with the motorcycle battery. In fact you may have cooked the ECU doing so. Some how we all need to get on the same page if that makes sense.
I use a mates battery that starts his bike an still no spark
 

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Go back to the words that talk about the damage you may have done to your bike. Usually if I have a bike that does not fire, it does not help if I have another one that does. Wintr has provided heaps of good info for you.

There are many other ways to prevent no spark. You need to explore them all, not just the coils. There are relays for the head light, switches in the side stand, extreme tippy switches, kill switches, neutral sensors, and clutch lever position sensors. Not to mention fuses big and small. And wyring connections. All can kill the ignition / spark.

UK
 

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Electronics and water are often a fatal combination. The ECU gets very small pulses from the timing sensor(s), and being wet can easily damage those parts sensitive enough to use those pulses. Also, when the ECU triggers a spark, the Voltage response from the coils can easily exceed 300V; that level can easily flash over wet parts. If your ECU was actually wet inside when you tried to use it, it may be unrecoverable.:cry:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The bikes been wet before an I just let everything dry out an it went fine so thats not the issue
 

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The very first idiot boxes in the 69 Kawasaki 500, and the 350 dirt bike, failed due to dampness.
The bikes in the desert areas ran fine, the bikes along the wet coast stopped. The early V4 Johnson and Evinrude OBMs with electronic ignitions failed to proceed. Kawasaki fixed under warranty for a while. OMC did not. $150 for a new idiot box back in the seventies.
Some of the electric connections on my XS1100, failed to connect. A new heavy continuous red wyre fixed the problem.

UK
 

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The bikes been wet before an I just let everything dry out an it went fine so thats not the issue
Well if there are no issues with the battery or the bike, and your friends bike runs, you should be out riding by now. Obviously something is amiss. Your job is to adequately search and find.
A very dry electrical connection, can still rob volts, if it is not clean bright and tight.
A volt meter is your friend.

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Discussion Starter #20
Had 2 different people with volt meters go over it an they couldnt work out ways wrong
 
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