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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. I have a 2019 Honda CB300R. I think it still has the original tires.

The coach who taught my BRC2 and ARC classes recommended "Michelin pilot power Road 5's or Road 6's."

Does that sound right to you?

Also, should I just have the dealer order and install the tires? Please note that I am NOT going to try this on my own.

Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The bike has 7,600 miles. I've been told across the board the rear tire needs to go. The front tire apparently still has life but the coach said that I may as well get the front tire replaced while I'm at it.

I live in Miami. It's hot and humid here for 7 months out of the year. It rains pretty frequently during that season, though I avoid riding in the rain. It's pleasant with low humidity for the remaining 5 months.
 

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I'm on my second set of road 5's on my VFR and they're decent for sure and I have Pirelli Diablo Rosso lll's on my Monster and they were factory and they were decent as well with the Pirelli's a little better on the front at the extremes, lots of feel.
 

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2020 Kawasaki Versys 1000 SE LT+
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It depends on what you expect out of a tire... dry traction, wet traction, or long wear. Not sure if they are available to fit such a small bike, but I do a lot of moderately "spirited" riding, and a lot of 5,000 to 8,000 mile multi-state tours that always result in some rain days. I've settled on Michelin Pilot Road GT tires... started back when the Pilot Road 3 was the new tire..... now, it's the Pilot Road 5 GT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just want a good all-around tire for primarily city riding, with some moderately spirited freeway riding, in primarily dry conditions with the potential for rain. I don't know if I can get more specific than this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Should I get the front tire replaced too even though technically the bike need one? The MSF instructor's rationale was, "since you're getting the rear tire replaced, you may as well get the front tire replaced."

In his defense, this is a 2019 bike and these are probably the original tires and it's hot down here. The front tire may have some dry rot.
 

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The front tire is the one that would concern me the most. At that age it definitely “could“ be suspect. If it were me, I wouldn’t hesitate to change that one out while you’re at it. You truly don’t want a front tire blowout.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just called the dealer about my 2019 Honda CB 300R.

They said that, for the Pilot Power Road 5's, the front is $229 and the rear is $232. For the 6's, they said front is $237 and the rear is $259.

They said my front tire is 110 by 70 by 17 and that my rear tire is 140 by 70 by 17.

Finally, they said installation would be $130.

Does this sound reasonable to you?
 

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........They said that, for the Pilot Power Road 5's, the front is $229 and the rear is $232. For the 6's, they said front is $237 and the rear is $259........
You are mixing up the two types. I just discovered that the "Pilot" is no longer part of the name. There is the "Road" and the "Power". The Road is a touring tire... longer wear and better wet traction with some sacrifice in dry traction. The Power is a sport tire.... better dry traction but shorter life.

The tire prices are about the same as ordering them on line (Revzilla or Cycle Gear). The installation seems more than a bit high. If I order tires through my dealer, the price is a bit higher, but mounting and balancing are free.
 

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You are talking taking the bike in, have them remove the rims, replace and balance the tires, and re-install everything correct? Buck thirty isn't bad for that, cheaper if you pull the rims and take them in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You are talking taking the bike in, have them remove the rims, replace and balance the tires, and re-install everything correct? Buck thirty isn't bad for that, cheaper if you pull the rims and take them in.
Yes, the dealer would do everything, i.e., order the tires and then install them. Everything that that entails.
 

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I just called the dealer about my 2019 Honda CB 300R.

They said that, for the Pilot Power Road 5's, the front is $229 and the rear is $232. For the 6's, they said front is $237 and the rear is $259.

They said my front tire is 110 by 70 by 17 and that my rear tire is 140 by 70 by 17.

Finally, they said installation would be $130.

Does this sound reasonable to you?
That pricing is quite similar to what my dealer charged me for my new tires last fall. I used my small local dealer rather than going to the city and checking out larger dealers. So I likely paid a little more.
 
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$130 to do the full installation is not a bad price at all, in fcat it's on the low side I think, and the tire prices seem about right too without looking them up.
I do my own tire mounting but if I was paying for it i would be happy with those prices.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The dealer seemed to inflate them past the recommended 29/33 (front/rear psi) standard somewhat. They are still a little over that, but not by much no more than 1 to 2 psi.
 

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Went with the Road 5's. Seem to be working well on the cornering, though the bike feels more jumpy when I go over bumps. In any event, thanks for the responses.
The dealer seemed to inflate them past the recommended 29/33 (front/rear psi) standard somewhat. They are still a little over that, but not by much no more than 1 to 2 psi.
Reviews suggest that is a great tire! I would strongly encourage you to check out Dave Moss's video on tire pressure. Small changes can make a HUGE difference in how the bike handles and is never a "one pressure fits all" scenario. Body weight, weather, and type of riding have a significant influence on how well a tire "works" at a given pressure. Best part of this? It's free and easy to do yourself and you learn about your bike!

Now, onto the suspension... :unsure::D
 
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