Motorcycle Forum banner
41 - 46 of 46 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Well that is insanely exciting and terrifying... and equally of both. The guy selling it is a 50(ish) year old man that said he has never gotten the bike over 5000 rpm. He says he doesn't know why he even bought it and is going back to a cruiser.

I think I am seeing the folly in this purchase for myself. I read a bunch of stuff that recommends getting a used 300 to 600 ish cc bike for dirt cheap and ride the thing into the ground. Learn it, grow with it, drop it, and when you learn to ride and if you can push it to its limit, then sell and get your big bike.

Well, I didn't look too hard, but you can't get much at all for under $5k here (on craig's list anyway). After seeing the bikes that cost $3000 to $5000, I can't help but think this bike is a steal for $6700 with brand new tires (though likely cheap tires). Only thing I could find for $5k currently was a '13 duke 690 and a '13 ninja 650. I am sure I could find cheaper deals around with some looking. But hard to justify those purchases when for $1.5k more you get this beauty.

I guess this will be an interesting mid-life crisis/experiment. I could get the bike, never get it over 5000 rpm and stay in grandpa riding modes and sell in a year after realizing there is no reason for me to own a bike like this. I could likely get most if not all of my $$ back in a year if I don't drop it. I could never get it over 5000 rpm and stay in safe mode and keep it for a long time as I enjoy riding it. Or perhaps I eventually learn to use it and let it rip from time to time if it feels right. Though it sounds like using it like this will always be illegal as I will never go to the track to push the bike.

For better or worse, I think I have decided to get it. Adults make their decisions and live (hopefully) with it. Still have about a week or more before actually getting it.

Thank you for the constant input. It is helpful to talk to people that know about bikes.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,145 Posts
I guess this will be an interesting mid-life crisis/experiment. I could get the bike, never get it over 5000 rpm and stay in grandpa riding modes and sell in a year after realizing there is no reason for me to own a bike like this. I could likely get most if not all of my $$ back in a year if I don't drop it. I could never get it over 5000 rpm and stay in safe mode and keep it for a long time as I enjoy riding it. Or perhaps I eventually learn to use it and let it rip from time to time if it feels right. Though it sounds like using it like this will always be illegal as I will never go to the track to push the bike.
That was my mentality when I picked up my F4i for next to nothing! A year later, I was winding it out and taking it to the track... :ROFLMAO:

Hope you enjoy it, regardless of riding style!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Interesting comment Doc!

Seems like this is turning more into motorcycle therapy for me. lol. But l want to keep the train rolling.

When I was riding my VTX early on. I didn't even notice at the time, but I was learning how to grab the throttle and how to twist it. There was a time early on when I grabbed the throttle with my wrist high, so I could have more twist range for power (if that makes sense). More wrist range to give it more twist without adjusting hands basically.

I realized quickly that when I would twist more and my body would be pulled back due to acceleration. And because of how I was holding throttle, I gave even more power unintentionally because my body was being thrown back and as my wrist straightened, I just kept giving it more power without meaning to. I did not crash of course. But I nearly lost hold because I was not expecting that much acceleration. The more it pulled the more I twisted and all that acceleration after the very first bit was not intentional. So I quickly learned not to grab the handle that way.

I imagine if I was on this 900 and in full power mode, that lesson would have been learned with me laying on the ground on my back. I have seen videos of it.

My new question is... After learning basic motorcycle 101 stuff, is it really smart to learn to ride a bike in the low-power/anti-wheelie rider modes? Wouldn't I just learn to ride a bike that is hiding all that power and shielding my learning with what is essentially training wheels? If I get accustomed to the throttle and handing where the real power isn't present and the front wheel never comes up because the computer is protecting me, then I will not be ready when I take those things off. I will put it on full power mode and if I handle the throttle the way I did with training wheels, I will be in trouble. Basically the power delivery that was safe while I learned it will now get me in trouble. So, I would have to unlearn the throttle/power delivery system almost like learning to ride an entirely different bike (but it's the same bike and therefore could be deceivingly dangerous). Sounds like an unsafe way to learn in my opinion.

Am I crazy to think this?
 

· Registered
CB125T, EX250 commuter, Ninja 250 racebike, CBR250R(MC19), VF500F, CBR600RR, VFR750F
Joined
·
819 Posts
Personally I abhor of all these electronic driver's aids: wheelie-control, traction-control, etc. It makes throttle feel all rubbery and loose as there is no longer instant response to your inputs. I prefer all-analogue bikes with no driver's aids and learned the finesse needed with controls to keep them within limits. I took race-training course at Willow Springs while back where they provided S1000RR. Absolutely hated how that bike felt, kinda like riding horse with rubber-bands for reins. I turned down all electronics to minimum and off if possible. Ahhh... so much better.

One thing I do favour is ABS on street bikes. There's simply no human alive that can get maximum braking AND cornering out of bike like ABS in emergency treacherous conditions such as rain or gravel or deer while coming around corner.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Doc Samson

· Registered
Joined
·
1,145 Posts
My new question is... After learning basic motorcycle 101 stuff, is it really smart to learn to ride a bike in the low-power/anti-wheelie rider modes?

Am I crazy to think this?
No, I feel the same way but should acknowledge that I've never owned a bike that had any electro-nannies. I, like you, learned the power of throttle control after opening it up a few times and sliding VERY far back on the seat! :eek: Fun, scary times!

I see those lower power modes being useful if riding in low traction conditions or urban "crawling" where an inadvertent dip into the power isn't needed or could be dangerous.
 
41 - 46 of 46 Posts
Top