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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Difference between a weekend mechanic and a professional mechanic Wade.

If you lively hood depended on your tools you would buy the better tools.

I am more of a weekend mechanic and my tools show it. I also have a cheap tool box with basic tools in all 3 cars and the boat. On the bike better tools but a very limited 'emergency' type tools
 

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American Legion Rider
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Yeah the feel of Snap-On used all day several times a day makes a lot of difference. Once in awhile use the squarer Craftsman is okay. Snap-On just feels so much better with their smoother lines.
 

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ZAMM Fanatic
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If you lively hood depended on your tools you would buy the better tools.
Respectfully disagree.

Seeing kids starting out as techs buying a ginormous shiny new box and ending up $10,000 or more in hock to the SnapOn corporation for tools that don't turn bolts any faster/better than Craftsman wrenches/sockets is downright criminal, IMHO. They become indentured labor, NOT TO MENTION the headache when they change shops.

My father used to repeat a story about 3 boxcar loads full of returned/broken Craftsman tools that UTTERLY disappeared from a Chicago switching yard.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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That is what makes this country a great Wade, everyone can have an opinion.
 

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Gone.
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I would call the kid that went too far into debt foolish, but I wouldn't say he's a criminal. :p

And there is a difference in how some tools preform. Sockets and some wrenches from Snap-on, Matco, and a few others are built to closer tolerances. There is less slop when you use them and they are less likely to contribute to rounding off a fastener. (At times Craftsman sockets have been like that too.)

If you're building a deck or repairing a lawnmower it probably doesn't make much difference, but if you're rebuilding engines it's pretty important.
 

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It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye
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Respectfully disagree.

Seeing kids starting out as techs buying a ginormous shiny new box and ending up $10,000 or more in hock to the SnapOn corporation for tools that don't turn bolts any faster/better than Craftsman wrenches/sockets is downright criminal, IMHO. They become indentured labor, NOT TO MENTION the headache when they change shops.

My father used to repeat a story about 3 boxcar loads full of returned/broken Craftsman tools that UTTERLY disappeared from a Chicago switching yard.

Wrong
Craftsman sockets and wrenches do not have the grip of a Snap-on flank drive period. 99% of pro's don't start with a 10k tool bill, they make do with what they can afford.
But after you've had to borrow a good tool because your average Craftsman crap has rounded off so much crap you can tell when it's about to get you in trouble "Again", you buy the best when you can afford it.
 
C

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I am the type person that buys tools when I need them. I usually buy what is available or can afford. I have a lot of tools but they are not Snap-on or Matco. I will agree that they are not well made like Snap-on or Matco but they do the job. If I had the extra money to upgrade everything I would. Eye is right though, Craftsman tools (sockets) do round off bolts with is why I spend more money on the sockets and use those instead.
 

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It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye
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I would call the kid that went too far into debt foolish, but I wouldn't say he's a criminal. :p
The few that do ring up a huge tool bill before they can afford it are just idiots and won't make you a good tech anyways. If you can't manage your money, there is very little hope for you when it comes to problem-solving.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
For me it isn't all about how far l can stretch my dollars, although l do pretty well by buying used. I have never actually bought any Snap On or Mac tools brand new. I pretty much buy them all on Ebay, and l will be looking for them when garage sale season kicks up. It is more about supporting our domestic industry, putting money in our own bank accounts rather than a Chinese bank account. I absolutely could buy everything l need at Harbor Freight and save so much that l could go buy another big ticket item, but that is just investing in foreign industry and divesting from domestic industry. The big picture starts with the little guy ;)

Oh, and as far as the debt goes...l just buy with cash, l am allergic to credit...it makes me break out in spots...very, very expensive spots!
 

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Premium Member
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Tools

Some tools can be lesser grade, if they are just sitting waiting for an emergency. But if you want a socket to remove the drain plug on your old Yamaha, it better be a good one with six sides.

Back when I sold boats, 12 foot models were popular for the lakes. I would pose the question; how many tin boats do you want to buy. Naturally one was the answer. So I would ask how many boats do you want to buy in your lifetime. Answer was still one. Well, here's the deal. You buy a good one for a bit more money, it will last your life time. You buy a cheap one, you will be back every ten years for another one. In the meantime the cheap one will not perform as good.

If I had bought a cheap stud remover about 50 years ago, I would have had to replace often, until I bought a good one.

My 41 Ford tractor starts first crank every time. Simple, tough and durable.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Some tools can be lesser grade, if they are just sitting waiting for an emergency. But if you want a socket to remove the drain plug on your old Yamaha, it better be a good one with six sides.

Back when I sold boats, 12 foot models were popular for the lakes. I would pose the question; how many tin boats do you want to buy. Naturally one was the answer. So I would ask how many boats do you want to buy in your lifetime. Answer was still one. Well, here's the deal. You buy a good one for a bit more money, it will last your life time. You buy a cheap one, you will be back every ten years for another one. In the meantime the cheap one will not perform as good.

If I had bought a cheap stud remover about 50 years ago, I would have had to replace often, until I bought a good one.

My 41 Ford tractor starts first crank every time. Simple, tough and durable.

Unkle Crusty*
Well said UC...it's what l have been trying to convey all along
 

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Troublemaker
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So Hawk, if it's all about the little guy, why do you not own an American made bike? Not that you don't have a great machine though.
 

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Gone.
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Buying a Snap-On tool off E-bay doesn't really do anything to support domestic industry. It doesn't do anything to support the small business owner who drives the tool truck either. It does benefit the person that's selling tools on E-bay though.
 
C

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My thinking is starting to change. Maybe I should caugh up the extra bucks for the tool truck driver next time I buy some tools.
 

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US made.

So Hawk, if it's all about the little guy, why do you not own an American made bike? Not that you don't have a great machine though.
The attempt to buy US made is admiral, even if not every dollar goes to the US market. A study of global trade will enlighten, while at the same time baffle.
Up until recently everyone in the US purchased 30% of all oil used from Canada. Trade does go around. Given the total amount of US dollars sent abroad I will say again, it is admiral for anyone to try and support the US.

I also said before, I imported enough US product into Canada to get a life time exemption.
Currently US manufacturing is under 10%, it needs to be over 20%. There is an excellent book on the subject called " Buying America Back "
Just like pollution, every little bit helps.
There is of course the other problem of US debt being purchased by foreign countries. The US is now third in the world for debt per person. Add in the pension deficits and it is not pretty.

Finally. The US does not quality small sport bikes at a reasonable price range. The $$ saved by buying a good SV650 could go towards hiring US workers and buying US made tools.

As an aside, of all the crew on the last winning US America's cup boat, only one was a US citizen.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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Discussion Starter #59
So Hawk, if it's all about the little guy, why do you not own an American made bike? Not that you don't have a great machine though.
Actually, l am starting to lean that direction. Tomorrow l am going to the Victory/Indian dealer here in San Diego on my way out of town. I'm going to look around and see what they have that catches my eye :)
 

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Discussion Starter #60
Buying a Snap-On tool off E-bay doesn't really do anything to support domestic industry. It doesn't do anything to support the small business owner who drives the tool truck either. It does benefit the person that's selling tools on E-bay though.
Well, l believe that most of the sellers l buy from are small business owners. And you're right, it doesn't really support domestic industry, but it keeps my dollars at home and does not send them to China. And l believe that from my example others might buy American as well, even if it is just from a pawn shop in Ohio that is selling stuff on Ebay.
 
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