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Great video man!

Most of us start on smaller, cheaper and lighter bike's and as we move on to the next ride, it inevitably is bigger, more expensive and heavier.

My first heavy bike was a new 1974 CB750 and a new 1981 Yamaha XS1100, then on to Harley Electra Glides and several Goldwings and my heaviest recently was a new 2012 Triumph Rocket 3 Roadster. I started working my way back to something lighter in a recently sold Suzuki DL650 V-strom and now a new Indian Scout that weighs half as much as my 2012 Goldwing.

I never, ever felt intimidated by weight until I sat on a BOSS HOSS at a Sturgis rally in about 1997, now that sucker felt like a tank.

Anyone that has had the big and heavy cruisers or touring bikes know that really, the weight once moving makes them if anything more planted and stable.

Sam:grin:
 

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I ride a big touring bike that weighs damn near half a ton but the first time I saw a big block Boss Hoss i was floored, damn that thing is HUGE and has to be so damn heavy. VERY intimidating to say the least!

I'm not sure about riding one, but I guess I'd give it a try if the opportunity presented itself, the guy who was riding it didn't seem to be having any issues, even on the gravel and grass where we were parked at a show.

Great video man!

I never, ever felt intimidated by weight until I sat on a BOSS HOSS at a Sturgis rally in about 1997, now that sucker felt like a tank.

:
 
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There was a guy up the road who had a Boss-Hoss for a few years – I think he sold it now, but I’d often see him out for an evening riding rural roads in good weather; however, other than a curiosity I don’t think I ever gave it more than a passing glance. What we now call cruisers, used to just be normal bikes – before the Japanese invasion of the 60s. There were some dirt/desert oriented bikes (largely from Europe), but at least when I was growing up – you almost had to ride a so-called larger bike, because that was as small as they got – an exception, a buddy of mine had an Allstate (Sears) 250 that I took a spin or two on before I had a driver’s license… but the first bike was a `37 EL (actually was my kid-brothers), and then a P11 Norton – which was pretty light – advertised at 390-something pounds – I put mine on a set of scales once, and without fenders and mufflers it actually came it at 387# wet, so it wasn’t too far off – but then it didn’t have USB ports, ABS, heated grips, EFI or hot and cold running water – let alone CB radio, clock, back-rests, fairings or electric start – or, monthly payments... hmmmm, probably a message there somewhere… To me, unless you want the sportier sport-bike posture, the ideal bikes may be the Electro-Glide style (now more or less Road-King, or original Nomads) or the Vetter fairing Gold-Wings. Most of the techno-gadgetry that modern riders are convinced to buy, add little or nothing to riding – indeed, all that gadgetry rather serves to separate and insulate the rider from the actual experience (IMO), and becomes a maintenance liability as the bike ages
 

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There is nothing like touring on my past Goldwings, Electra Glides or BMW K1200LTC, electrically adjusting the height/ angle of the windshield to suit the conditions, using the heated grips and seat in COLD conditions, getting 45 to 55 mpg at 70+ mph on the Interstates, enjoying the CRUISE control and the 8 disk CD player/ MP3/ USB Flash Drive blasting out the "Ride of the Valkyrie's" or "Voodoo Child" or "Living dead Girl" " A Tout Le Monde" or "A Country Boy can survive," etc, being pumped through 200 to 550 watts of surround sound! All the while eating up those 500 to 850 mile days in total comfort, safety and civility, with a big smile on ones face knowing that the little hard assed Superbike is sitting in one's garage, ready to take a long and twisty ride of sub 100 miles:grin:

Different strokes for different Folks---Ol' Sly:wink2:

Sam:nerd:
 

· Administrator - American Legion Rider - KA5LRS
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The guy that digs post holes in rock around here for fences has a Boss Hoss. He loves it. Says it's not much different than any other bike. Now just how can a bike with a 454 Chevy engine not be a little different? But that's his claim. And he's been to Sturgis almost every year since he's had them. I think this is his 3rd one. Says it might be a little warmer in the summer. But then he never felt my Indian before I fixed that problem either. That was the hottest bike I've ever owned until the fix. He's comparing it to Harleys which he gave to his son after he got the BH's.
 
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There is nothing like touring ... being pumped through 200 to 550 watts of surround sound! All the while eating up those 500 to 850 mile days in total comfort...

Different strokes for different Folks---
Yep, no question – a buddy of mine and his wife are just enough younger than me to be the oldest techno-geeks around (here at least). He’s Bluetooth connected, with tunes, phone and talking GPS (even though I use GPS in the car/truck, I’ve ridden probably half to two-thirds of the states and have yet to use anything other than paper maps…) as well as an occasional Go-Pro on their Can-Am… they love it. Me, I really do listen to the engine – wonder what this sound or that is (is the cam chain tensioner keeping up, or do I need to stop and give the dang thing a nudge…) and enjoy that. When I ride I carry my cell (a genuine slide-phone), but it is off… When I had my Ultra – no sound ever came out of the speakers for the 7-8 years I had it… perhaps embarrassing, but oh well…
 
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