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Hey guys! I just got back from test driving my Bandit! It felt so amazing, the first time riding was definitely a memorable moment.

Some issues I ran into personally:

Stalling (A LOT): Still trying to get used to the friction zone of my clutch while giving it throttle, but I'm not used to a 600's power so I gotta practice a lot more in my parking lot. Especially when I'm at a complete stop, I can't seem to get it moving without stalling it! :mad:

Turns: I'm still getting used to turning as well, I take 2 lanes I've noticed in my parking lot when turning, gotta learn to take one for when I'm on the real road.

Throttle Feeding: My biggest issue haha, It's hard to get used to a 600's power so I'm trying to get the technique down with giving it the slightest throttle while focusing on not stalling!

Shifting: As I come to complete stops I gotta remember to shift down and what not. And perfecting that smooth shift at the best times, rather than feeling the bike shake whenever I need to shift.
 

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The main reason for stalling is releasing the clutch too soon. The clutch should be eased out while moving. For the smoothest take offs, the motorcycle will likely move about 20 feet before the clutch lever is completely out. When you are stalling, it's probably because you have the clutch lever completely released after 2-3 feet of movement. Smooth use of the throttle will make this easier.

Practicing with a paddle-walk or duck walk and just concentrating on using the friction zone without picking your feet up will help you find and use the friction zone properly.

Practice slow speed turns after you have smooth control of the clutch. If you are still struggling with taking off in a straight line, adding a turn is just going to complicate things.

Shifting down to first during every stop is the best habit to maintain. It will come with practice.
 

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Getting professional training will help you immensely with the basics as well as give you a good foundation of strategy to stay safe on the road. I'd highly recommend taking a rider course before heading out into traffic.
 

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What Dobs said
 

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Not the bike to jump right in with. Your maximum horsepower is made at 10,500 RPM so it's no wonder you are stalling a lot. Practice, practice, practice take the courses and possibly take a track course so you have some expertise before you go mixing it up with traffic. I can not think of a worse class of bike to learn on.
 

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What critter said.


A BRC or MSF course will help you immensely with just the basics and finding the friction zone. Best money I ever spent. I use things I learned in that class everyday I ride.
 

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The best way of finding the friction zone would start in an empty parking lot. Ease off the clutch just enough to where you feel the bike start to move. Pull back in, bike will stop. Keep practicing this till you can tell where the friction zone is going to start. This is the point where you can ease on the throttle. When I'm taking corners from a stop, I sometimes ride the friction zone, especially on a non familiar turn. It will become second nature. Soon you'll be speed shifting. Oh, and anyone who says they havent stalled out either is a big fat liar or has never driven a standard or bike. LOL!!!
 
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