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Discussion Starter #1
New to the motorcycle repair world, I had to pick up my first multimeter. With so many options online I had no idea what to get. Usually when it comes to buying tools I like to spend the extra cash and get something that I know is a great product. But I know I dont need an extravagant multimeter for a bike so I went with a basic Extech MN25 because that what the local store had and I didnt want to wait for an online shipment.

Does anyone have a multimeter that they love. Or think a $50+ was worth it?
Does the basic $30 meter do they job?
 

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I use a fairly cheap digital one. It does the job.

If it was something used most every day, a more rugged, better built one would probably be a good idea.
 

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Just about any meter, even a Harbor Freight el-cheapo, will do for very basic motorcycle trouble shooting. The issue with the real cheap ones is lack of features and longevity.

You did fine and that meter you bought should serve you well for about everything you'll want to do with it, and you'll likely have it for a long time.

If you want to get into working on EFI bikes and dig into diagnosing some of their issues, you'll need a more accurate and capable (more expensive) meter. I have a Fluke, and a clamp-on Fluke that was re-branded as a Sears.
 

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I bought a little pencil style DMM almost 30 years ago and it is still going strong. I recently picked up larger clamp-on meter (because I needed to measure to 200A AC) with more functions including DC Amperes and that has become my shop meter.

Everything is made in the Orient now and it doesn't matter much what you buy in digital.
 

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Charlie Tango Xray
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I have a good quality meter that I keep hidden. And a few inexpensive ones that my sons use when they come over. They fried more than a few over the years. ;)
 

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Driftless Rider
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I have a good quality meter that I keep hidden. And a few inexpensive ones that my sons use when they come over. They fried more than a few over the years. ;)
Most meters "fry" because someone has set it on amps but attempted a voltage measurement, in effect, putting a direct short between power and ground.

Fortunately MOST meters have a replaceable fuse in the back.

If you touch two (typical) meters leads together, one set on volts, the other on ohms, you should see .7V and 10,000,000 ohms, respectively. Chew on that awhile.

I own a dozen meteres, from programmable Flukes to Harbor Freighties (to a couple of vintage meters from "back in the day.") . The most valuable feature I have found in voltmeters at ANY price point is the auto-off function - so you don't constantly have to go chasing batteries!

... and a replaceable fuse! ;)
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Vacuum Tube Volt Meter?
 

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Like my 1962 Heathkit VTVM? (Bet the young folks don't even know what a VTVM is LOL!) It will still do some things none of the others can :wink:
I don't know what a VTVM is, but I know a little bit about Heathkit. When I was a kid I used to sit in the basement and watch my uncle solder up kits he had bought by mail order. (I remember a transistor radio in particular because he gave it to me!)

What I like about programmable meters is the ability to record high and low readings. That can be very helpful when you're trying to diagnose a problem with an EFI signal from, or to, one of the various sensors. They have many more capabilities too, such as temperature, but I seldom use them. Heck, some of them I'm not even sure what they are. :biggrin:
 

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Vacuum Tube Volt Meter?
GIVE THE MAN A CIGAR! A VTVM can measure high voltages, irregular wave shapes, peak voltage, and a few other things that digital meters normally don't. My VTVM comes out of storage maybe once every couple of years.

Right now I am chasing a intermittent mid-range miss on a '67 Honda 305 and will pull out another "big gun" - a digital storage oscilloscope - to see if the miss is caused by no spark or some other cause. It is nice to have some sophisticated tools left over from a career in the field.
 

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I just got a new Bosch from OReillys.

I have 2 spare HarborFreight digitals that work for unimportant checks.

It is the best meter I have ever had.

I had a really nice analog VOM, but it seems everybody else liked it too, my dad has it now....
 

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I have a Micronta, from the eighties. I repaired copiers, so, needed a decent meter. I keep a harbor freight meter in the drawer, too. I use the HF for anything that might damage the micronta.

Alligator clips, insulated and slip on the probes, used to be available anywhere meters are sold. Now, not so much, but they are a super handy accessory. The ones I found that fit were junk.
 
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