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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did it again this year, sort of a last minute decision. I wasn't planning on going, but the job I was going to do that day postponed and I needed a ride anyway. It was actually a bit bittersweet - this was the last great adventure for this particular bike, my '81 Goldwing. (Being replaced by a slightly newer bike now.)


Started out at the base by the old toll house. From here it's an 8 mile trip up the auto road to the summit - the highest point east of the Mississippi river. Steep, narrow, and winding road all the way up.


What a great bike! Made it to the top!


It was a very nice day, but quite cool at the summit. Actually, a damp wind came up for a bit and the temperature dropped into the 40s. Weather here is very extreme and can become quite deadly year round. Highest recorded wind speed on earth is right here.


They have to chain the buildings down with safety chains....


Or build them out of stone with 3 foot thick walls. This is the Tip Top House, which is a historical lodge - sort of an inn where people can book meals and beds.


Also part of the AT, which runs from Georgia to Maine.


Looking out over some of the Presidential Range of the White Mountains.


It can be a lot to take in.

The rides up and down were relatively uneventful. It was my second time doing the road, but it really is pretty easy on a motorcycle. First and second gears all the way up - take breaks to cool your engine if you need to. Engine braking all the way down.

Monday and Thursday of Bike Week the road is only open to motorcycles, so even though it's fairly narrow in places, there's plenty of room for bikes.

Reason number 32,043 to ride a motorcycle.

:71baldboy:
 

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Eating GSXRs, Sh***ing CBRs
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Great pics! No sportbikes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Probably more than 75% cruisers, HD etc. A lot of adventure/dual sport models too. Some sportbikes, but not many that I remember.

One Slingshot.. who let him in? I thought it was motorcycles only?!

:biggrin:
 

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So long
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Thanks for posting some great pictures. It brings back memories of when I hiked the backside of Mt Washington several times going by Tuckerman Ravine up through the Alpine Garden to the top of Mt Washington. I belonged to The Skimos ski club in Jackson, NH. Our ski house was right next door to the Wildcat Tavern. Those were some great times.
 

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Went skiing the next mountain over with my neighbors who were from the area. -18 on the slopes that day. -35 on top of MW
 

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The 43rd Poser
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Sounds like a great day!

I'd love to make that ride one day!!



And not to argue,

But I am a bit of a stickler for facts...
While Mt Washington at 6288 is impressive, and known for it's fierce weather, it is not the tallest east of the Mississippi...

nor 2nd nor 3rd....

http://traveltips.usatoday.com/10-tallest-mountains-east-mississippi-104158.html
The highest peaks east of the Mississippi all reside in the Blue Ridge province of the Southern Appalachians, most notably in the Black and Great Smoky mountains of North Carolina and Tennessee.
The top 10 are:
(1) 6,684-foot Mount Mitchell
(2) 6,647-foot Mount Craig
(3) 6,643-foot Clingman’s Dome
(4) 6,621-foot Mount Guyot
(5) 6,611-foot Balsam Cone
(6) 6,593-foot Mount LeConte
(7) 6,571-foot Mount Gibbes
(8) 6,475-foot Potato Hill
(9) 6,417-foot Mount Chapman
(10) 6,410-foot Richland Balsam.
 

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Ah Mt. Washington!!

Makes sense, since the Laconia Bike Week is wrapping up, up that way.

When you are riding thru Alton Bay, you have to go directly in front of my family cottage there (by the stone bridge, just after the old Train Station.

In my College days, I had climbed (crampons, ropes, ice picks, etc) Mt. Washington twice, in Winter. We would leave from Pinkham Knotch, after spending the first night in their Lodge there, (watching the weather reports that would feed down from the Observatory every hour).

It's about 3/4 of a mile up, in woods, and then 1/4 is ice cap (no trees or cover).

Tuckerman's Ravine was a particularly dangerous spot, which is prone to avalanches, and so we would stop at the Harvard Hut (a small enclosed shelter built by the AMC (American Mountain Climbers Assoc. at Harvard) for the night. We could 'turn around and go back" from there, if the weather was exceptionally bad, or if Tuckerman's Ravine was risky to pass thru.

We used to get our gear from the AMC, (sleeping bags, tools, etc) for free, as long as we did formal written Evaluations of the gear. Food came from the College (lol).

When i see the cars/motorcycles/motor homes, with the stickers that say "This Car Climbed Mt. Washington," I think to myself........"yeah, but you haven't CLIMBED it!!"

Nevertheless, it is a beautiful mountain view, and one of the "must do" things in New Hampshire when you are there. Glad you enjoyed it. "Thanks" for the pics! They brought back some really fond memories!!

-Soupy
 

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I love Wildcat Mountain. Skied it many times.
I had a set of ski's when I was a lad, in Nothern Maine. I used to do cross-country competitions in grade school ("down hill" ski's not the best for "cross country" but anyway).

Never did any downhill skiing. Always wanted to............

-soupy
 

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It must get powerfully windy to require a building to be anchored with chains! Wow.

 

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I went up alone a few years ago and i loved it. I didn't know anyone who had gone up so i was so surprised at the views and the roads. It was perfect weather that day, so blue. A trip i will never ever forget.

Oh i stopped at the first pull over spot because i panicked over the dirt road, I figured i would take a few pics and go back down. I couldnt believe what i was seeing, I pulled out my phone so i could call my husband! No phone service up there. LOL I just had to go up and glad i did
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Sorry, I got a bit mixed up. It's the highest peak in the Northeast, and the most prominent peak east of the Mississippi - had to look it up.


Got a video of the ride up uploaded. Long and boring, and the sound didn't come out quite right.
 

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Not to brag but my State of birth, California, has the highest Elevation mountain range in the United States and the highest peak, Mount Whitney. I've ridden to the Summit many times. The Summit parking lot offers unbelievable views!

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...O_OxIvkj33m1EIK3w&sig2=k6wj13j9KdEhuzyJ1K7a2w

Thanks for the Pictures and narrative cmonSTART, I really enjoyed it. Most of my riding has been west of TN and most of the States West of there.

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ha! I've never been west of Buffalo, NY on a motorcycle. This is the best I can do for mountains!
 

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The 43rd Poser
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Not to brag but my State of birth, California, has the highest Elevation mountain range in the United States and the highest peak, Mount Whitney. I've ridden to the Summit many times. The Summit parking lot offers unbelievable views!
Again, not to interrupt with facts....

But.

The highest peak in the United States is in Alaska.
Mount McKinley's peak is 20,322 feet.

The highest point in California is Mount Whitney, at 14,505.

Mount Whitney IS the highest peak in the contiguous 48, but is 12th in the United States.

Picking bones? Maybe. But Alaska IS a part of the US.

Now tallest mountain? The United States also has the TALLEST mountain in the world.

Everest you say?

http://knowledgenuts.com/2013/07/21/mount-everest-is-not-the-tallest-mountain/
Mount Everest is the highest, but the tallest is actually Mauna Kea in Hawaii. This is because ‘highest’ is defined as a measure of mean sea level to summit, while ‘tallest’ is a measurement from the bottom of the mountain to the top. From it’s base to it’s tip, Mauna Kea measures 33,465 feet. In comparison, from base to tip, Mount Everest comes in at a measly 29,029 feet, shorter by more than 4000 feet.
 

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I was thinking in the contiguous United States:biggrin:

I have always thought that the highest meant from sea level, not from under sea level:confused:

Interesting:icon_cool:

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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He did say "tallest" though. So if we go into another Ice Age and the seas drop we might have to update the book of records.:D
 
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