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So, I was driving my motorcycle one day and it suddenly died on me. No electricity at all on the bike. No front light nothing. The bike was completely dead. I had to get the bike towed home. Bummer.

Once home I tried diagnosing the issue. The motorcycle battery was duly charge at this point and when I tried the ignition it still won't crank up nor have any lights power on. I though this was strange. I checked the voltage on the battery and it was fine. I was getting close to 13 volts.The battery is a brand new gel battery. I bought pretty recent. I decided to replace the ignition which that didn't help. I also replaced the starter relay selonoid. That didn't work either. After replacing both. I still didn't get the lights to come on nor the bike to start. The bike won't do anything. It's dead. If I bypass the selonoid and connect one of those ends straight to the battery, the battery tries to turn on and it keep acting like it's going to turn on but it doesn't. I don't know what else to check.

I would appreciate any advise. Thanks in advance.
 

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I have checked the main fuses which are currently located under the seat. There are three fuses.All fuses look fine. Are there some other fuses located else where I may need to check.
 

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There may be a main fuse, which looks more like a fusible link, somewhere along the positive battery line before the fuse box.
 

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Six-String Jockey
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Also, put your test meter's positive wire on the positive post of the battery, and your test meter's negative wire anywhere on the body of the bike. Does it read 12V? If it does - fine. If it doesn't - your ground wire from the battery is not making contact for some reason.

You can also connect a good strong wire (or jumper cable) from the negative post of your battery to a good ground on the body, thus bypassing the bike's negative wire and see if it makes a difference. If it does, then again your negative connection is faulty.
 

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So I tried it, I connected the positive cable to the positive battery connect and the negative to the chassis of the motorcycle. The volt meter read 13 volts. Seems good. The bike won't give me a any power however when I turn the ignition switch to on.
 

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Have you checked the circuit to the ignition switch? If you have the voltage, but the bike doesn't react when you enable it, that might be the problem. Not sure why it would die like that, but if a wire came loose/disconnected, that could be it.
 

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I just fixed a machine today that the wire came loose that supplied the power to the fuel pump, like i said, check to see if you have power going to the ignition switch, if you do, than check to see if you have power going to to the accessories side of the ignition switch when you turn it to on, if you do that check to see if you have power going to the starter solenoid when you turn the ignition to start.
 

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I agree with Industrial-Mech, you should try and check up near the ignition. It could be a ground wire somewhere too. Either way, from the sounds of it, a wire somewhere went which would explain the suddeness, the wire probably is old or at a bendy spot and finally snapped....
 

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What year, make, and model bike?
This^^^^^ It turns out in searching other threads that it is a 1976 CB550

I just happen to have a 1977 Cb550 with a service manual,so here goes.

First,the honda in question has a glass fuse panel with a 15 amp main and a headlite and taillite fused separately Just because fuses look good is no guarantee. Check their continuity with a tester or simply replace them as they may be decades old. My fuses were ok,but the fuse clips had a sort of black coating that had to be removed before the current would pass through. A tester revealed this condition. I used mild acid to clean them up.

First,get a multimeter and check the main wire going to the fuse box. This wire is probably red and thicker than the others. Then check across the fuse to the other side and it should still be hot. Check across the fuse with the key both 'off' and "on'. FYI,the fuse should be a 15 amp and the other fuses are 7 and possibly 5 or 7 for the other one. You get the idea If your key switch is working correctly,the other fuses should get current

The second place to check is the starter solenoid. your battery connects to one of the posts of the solenoid and the main wire to the fuse block shares that as well. Bad connections due to corrosion are a normal part of maintenance that must be managed. On some Hondas,there is also a fusible link at the solenoid which is just a piece of exposed lead foil which turns to powder over time. My 1977 does not have it,but check yours anyway.

The third place to look after the first two is not so easy. The switch on your bike terminates in a plastic [six connectors] block that goes into the headlight rats nest of wires. The red wire feeds power to the switch and once the switch is turned on,it comes out the black wires The rear section of the switch has contacts which can corrode as well,or the other plastic connector block inside the headlight bucket can need to be cleaned and protected with silicone grease
With the key on,you should have power to all fuses in the block.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The motorcycle is a 1976 Honda cb 550k. I have to check on wether the selonoid is receiving electricity. Will check this weekend .
 
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