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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I'm a complete newbie and wanted to know more about motorcycle kits.

How difficult would it be for me to build my own kit with no prior experience?

Also, how could these kits be improved?

Thank you!
 

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I think that's really subjective - based on you and your related experience. Do you own a set of tools? And know how to use them? Do you do do your own maintenance on other every day things, or take them somewhere? Can you take the time to make sure things are done properly? After all, your life (and others) will be at stake while you're riding this thing.
 

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lost
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I'm curious about what motorcycle kits he's talking about. I believe he posted on motorcycle-usa.com and I responded there.
 

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lost
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I found these on a search and they look pretty darn good. They're fairly simple layouts it looks like, not a load of body work, just the basic stuff. I can't see them being too difficult to assemble for someone who has done more than the basic oil change type stuff.
 

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Those are cool. I think Leno did a piece on the Suzuki Ryca kits.
 

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American Legion Rider
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I'm confused.:confused: What ever happened to just stripping off everything and building it back up the way you want it? Are these "kits" for those that have no imagination of their own or is there a reason to buy a kit? I thought the whole idea was to personalize your bike. But we're not talking about a rat bike so my confusion is what is it about the kits that makes it okay? Got to be something more than just swapping parts, correct?
 

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Gone.
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I found these on a search and they look pretty darn good. They're fairly simple layouts it looks like, not a load of body work, just the basic stuff. I can't see them being too difficult to assemble for someone who has done more than the basic oil change type stuff.
Yeah, those look pretty simple for anyone with average skills and the ability to follow directions carefully. You're basically just switching out the seat, exhaust, bars, shocks, and so forth. The prices, (on the Sportster stuff,) don't look outrageously higher for the kit then buying the individual parts, but it would save time and headaches for someone that's not sure what to get and what fits what.
 

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Intern, it would be nice to know a little about your experience and if you have a bike, ever had a bike, know how to use tools, have a donor bike in mind, etc-etc.:p

I have some friends who have ridden 50 years and can barely change their own oil without supervision, so don't take on more than your experience will allow.

Sam:biggrin:
 

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lost
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I'm confused.:confused: What ever happened to just stripping off everything and building it back up the way you want it? Are these "kits" for those that have no imagination of their own or is there a reason to buy a kit? I thought the whole idea was to personalize your bike. But we're not talking about a rat bike so my confusion is what is it about the kits that makes it okay? Got to be something more than just swapping parts, correct?
I've got a good friend that loves old Honda 750s. Before this weekend I had 4 motors, a rolling basket case, and part of a bike with an engine in it. After this weekend I only have two of the motors left. I was happy to clear some space from my shop and Leo was thrilled with the pieces. He's turned out some nice rat/café bikes. He has enough of them running so when his friends visit they can all go out for a ride. So the craft is alive and well.

These just provide another way for someone to get into riding their own ride. Even though it is a kit, there is still the satisfaction of having assembled it yourself I suppose. I sort of did that putting together a side car rig a few years ago. I know the bike better than I would had I just bought a rig or had someone else do the layout for me. Oh, and the paint isn't something you'll see on any other similar rig. So these kit bikes can be personalized.
 

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American Legion Rider
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I sorta figured it must just be a quick way to get the job done. I wasn't sure about how much customizing could be done with a "kit". Other than paint and graphics.
 

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Pegasus trapped in a human body on a motorcycle
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I would like to see Ryca make a kit for the 500 Ninja, or maybe even the 650. Or maybe the CB1100 or VT-750RS
 

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I sorta figured it must just be a quick way to get the job done. I wasn't sure about how much customizing could be done with a "kit". Other than paint and graphics.
I mucked around with the kit ordering. The kit components seem to vary a bit. You can get wheel kits that aren't laced if you want IIRC. That is more than the average bear would want to tangle with.
 

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lost
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I sorta figured it must just be a quick way to get the job done. I wasn't sure about how much customizing could be done with a "kit". Other than paint and graphics.
When you think of it, rat bikes are usually from thrashed bikes where one puts together a complete bike from parts scavenged off old boat anchors. With these you don't have to scavenge. Binned parts or parts bins? Which do you want to pull parts from?
 

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The way I see it sure you are buying parts off of a shelf and for the most part just replacing them but how many of us have the equipment or skill to hand build gas tanks, fenders and other body sections? Even custom bike builders have what they call "production" models that use parts off the shelf from suppliers to reduce cost and sell more bikes to more riders with the "custom" being choice of gas tank/body work and paint. Look up Exile Cycles on the net, they sell complete bikes or you can buy them in kit form if you are so inclined and have the skill to pretty much put all the parts together with the pile of parts costing nearly half of what a turnkey custom would. So go ahead newb, have fun and do what you want to, good luck.
 

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I'm too, uhh, umm, old to be a model. His career trajectory is beyond my capabilities. :mad:

Besides, I'd have a lot of pissed off clients and two pissed off employees if I jumped ship.
 
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