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Yes there are far more economical options available.
Also keep in mind that if you need short term use of expensive shop tools, they really do rent those things for short term use at decent rent-all stores.
A re-uasable master link is the only way to go if you service your bike lots.
 

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OK, let's stick with my question please?

'82 bike came with a vanilla 530 chain with clip master link. Bike shop sold me a 530 x 102 link Bikemaster XR sealed chain with a rivet master link. A couple of videos I have watched say you must buy the $100+ heavy pro style chain tool if you want to get more than a couple of uses out of it. THAT was my question, do I need to follow that advice, or is there a more economical tool that will suit my needs for a rivet link?

Also, Bikemaster sells a clip on sealed master link for that chain, why couldn't I use that? A clip on master link is what came new with the bike, and it shows no sign of ever coming off. Also, I have never heard of one coming of of anyone's bike that I know of. I realize that it must be installed correctly, and am aware of the damage a thrown chain can cause. But I like the idea of being able to remove a chain if I need to/want to.

So, your opinion please, on rivet or clip on, and if rivet only is a definite must, your choice of rivet tool?

I would go rivet for a street bike. A toy dirt bike you could probably get away with a clip on. My chain breaker is a Stockton, had it for many years, only used it twice but it still works like new. I think it was around 80.00. To answer your question from your opening post, yes, You want to remove the master link. If you need to shorten it just remove the next link. When you are putting on a new chain(rivet type) the main problem that happens is cutting the new chain to short. If that happens, you need to buy a new chain. So just be very careful and make sure you do not cut it to short.
 

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How's that :unsure: is there a rule against having 2 master links. You could make a new chain from all the sections you cut off over the years if you really like:LOL: great idea if you are paying the same money for a longer chain every time.
 

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How's that :unsure: is there a rule against having 2 master links. You could make a new chain off all the sections you cut off over the years if you really like:LOL: great idea if you are paying the same money for a longer chain every time.
Yea you could probably run a multiple pieced together chain on a toy dirt bike. I wouldn't recommend it on a real road bike. Just my opinion. When a chain wears out, buy a new one. If you can't afford a $100.00 chain every ten years, you have other issues to worry about. Maybe motorcycle riding should not be in your future.
 

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:LOL: why do call them toy bikes unless you have no clue about motorcycles,
and **** man I wear at least one chain out annually, you're not suppose to run them when they are all bagged out.
 

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:LOL: why do call them toy bikes unless you have no clue about motorcycles,
and **** man I wear at least one chain out annually, you're not suppose to run them when they are all bagged out.
If you're having to piece together chains to save money what else is being skipped on? I can see a chain covered in dirt and not being cleaned could wear one out fast. If you remember, the poster is talking a road bike, not a dirt bike. My advice was directed toward him.
 

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OK, let's stick with my question please?

'82 bike came with a vanilla 530 chain with clip master link. Bike shop sold me a 530 x 102 link Bikemaster XR sealed chain with a rivet master link. A couple of videos I have watched say you must buy the $100+ heavy pro style chain tool if you want to get more than a couple of uses out of it. THAT was my question, do I need to follow that advice, or is there a more economical tool that will suit my needs for a rivet link?

Also, Bikemaster sells a clip on sealed master link for that chain, why couldn't I use that? A clip on master link is what came new with the bike, and it shows no sign of ever coming off. Also, I have never heard of one coming of of anyone's bike that I know of. I realize that it must be installed correctly, and am aware of the damage a thrown chain can cause. But I like the idea of being able to remove a chain if I need to/want to.

So, your opinion please, on rivet or clip on, and if rivet only is a definite must, your choice of rivet tool?
Poster sounds like he has it together just fine.
 

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Ignoring RSTrials.
Millions of bikes used the old style chains with a joining link that had a clip. I do not know of any of this type that have failed. I spent quite a few years at the track. There was a 250, 350 which later became a 400, and a 750 production class.
None of them had chain problems. I ran bikes in those classes, plus in the 250 and open GP classes. Never had a chain problem. Bikes at the IOM have had chains break. It is from extreme abuse. Massive squatting that flattens the belly pans, lift off ( both wheels ) and hard landings. It is difficult the get the correct throttle off and on, for air and landings.

Because we changed the overall gearing on some bikes, we used whole and half links. Never had a problem. Some folks who do not oil their chains, and let the joints get rusty and kinky stiff, may have and do have problems.
As you found out, chains are sized to match the bike.
Our small bikes use about one size up, from the smaller 250 dirt bikes that do abuse chains. And that depends on how and where they ride. My XS400 is running a cheap chain with a joining link. It has been doing good service for several years. That bike does get air over a rise in the road near me.

Some folks abuse and ignore the sprockets. These are the type that might have chain problems. A grinder as Trials suggested, can grind off the ends of the pins. Not sure why a chain breaker would be better for this job. My chain breaker is probably not strong enough to push the pins out of a modern chain, but it does work on the size we use.
A decent grinder may not save any money, but it will have other uses.

My manure spreader used the same size as our bikes. It was subjected to more whipping, twisting, jerking and thrashing than our bikes provide. Keep the chain oiled, and not too tight. UK

Back to the soap opera.
 

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This (y)
"A clip on master link is what came new with the bike, and it shows no sign of ever coming off. Also, I have never heard of one coming of of anyone's bike that I know of. I realize that it must be installed correctly, and am aware of the damage a thrown chain can cause. But I like the idea of being able to remove a chain if I need to/want to."


It's not the motor power on the road that will test your chain it's the rear brake or something jammed in it or a misalignment in the sprockets for a dozen different possible reasons.

Once you grind the heads off the pins you can drive the side plate off with a dull 3 inch nail and a rock.
 

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Ignoring RSTrials.
Millions of bikes used the old style chains with a joining link that had a clip. I do not know of any of this type that have failed. I spent quite a few years at the track. There was a 250, 350 which later became a 400, and a 750 production class.
None of them had chain problems. I ran bikes in those classes, plus in the 250 and open GP classes. Never had a chain problem. Bikes at the IOM have had chains break. It is from extreme abuse. Massive squatting that flattens the belly pans, lift off ( both wheels ) and hard landings. It is difficult the get the correct throttle off and on, for air and landings.

Because we changed the overall gearing on some bikes, we used whole and half links. Never had a problem. Some folks who do not oil their chains, and let the joints get rusty and kinky stiff, may have and do have problems.
As you found out, chains are sized to match the bike.
Our small bikes use about one size up, from the smaller 250 dirt bikes that do abuse chains. And that depends on how and where they ride. My XS400 is running a cheap chain with a joining link. It has been doing good service for several years. That bike does get air over a rise in the road near me.

Some folks abuse and ignore the sprockets. These are the type that might have chain problems. A grinder as Trials suggested, can grind off the ends of the pins. Not sure why a chain breaker would be better for this job. My chain breaker is probably not strong enough to push the pins out of a modern chain, but it does work on the size we use.
A decent grinder may not save any money, but it will have other uses.

My manure spreader used the same size as our bikes. It was subjected to more whipping, twisting, jerking and thrashing than our bikes provide. Keep the chain oiled, and not too tight. UK

Back to the soap opera.
The chain breaker also has a tool to spread the end of the rivet to hold it in place. A grinder or file is used to remove the nub off the old rivet. Then the breaker is used to push the old pin out so as not to damage the rings. They call it a chain breaker but to does much more. There is a reason chain makers have gotten away from the clips.
 

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You can say that again UK

Chain makers have gotten away from clips, now that's funny.
why chain makers :LOL: don't want to sell them any more?
I would press the rivets on with a rivet press that was designed for it if I really had to install one ever.
 

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Good point RS. Some tools will burr over the ends of the new pins. But not required for the clippons. UK
I put a new chain on the chopper over the past winter while I had it apart getting painted. I bought a RK 530 o-ring chain. It only came with a riveted master link. It had been years since I used that chain breaker but it worked like a charm.
 

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Rivet type master links are the same price as cir-clip master links. You can buy a chain that comes with both.
wtf chain do you think is on my MV Agusta @R. S. Morris
you couldn't ride a trials bike to save your life.
but I'd pay money to see you try.
 

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Rivet type master links are the same price as cir-clip master links. You can buy a chain that comes with both.
wtf chain do you think is on my MV Agusta @R. S. Morris
you couldn't ride a trials bike to save your life.
but I'd pay money to see you try.
I didn't say there was any difference in the price, Where did that come from? Well, you don't really know what I can ride or can't, so will just leave it at that. You know, keepin' it real.
 

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Was looking around some sport bike forums and they are full of posts like this.........


"OK.. I own the RK chain tool and I have done rivet type links until my last chain replacement about 1200 miles ago. Since I am always messing with sprocket sizes and I wanted more freedom to remove chain easier without redoing the rivet or disassembling half the bike, I opted for the clip style link.

Fast forward 1200 miles and yesterday.

Sunday it was beautiful out. I decide I want to go for a ride but I have been meaning to swap the front 16t off and stick on the 15t for fun. (I already run a 45t out back). I get the bike up on the stand, loosen the rear axle move the adjusters all the way forward and remove the front sprocket cover. I click first gear so I can remove the front sprocket nut and spin the wheel round to lock the gear in. WTF?! The clip on the clip link is effing missing. It's just gone. Luckily the sideplate is still pressed on and in place. I just can't believe my eyes. You hear all the paranoid and over cautious riders/mechanics rant on about the hazards of the dreaded clip style link. Never once did I really think it would actually come off. Insane!

Installed the front 15t, pressed off the clip link side plate and pins and promptly installed the rivet style I was saving.

I am here to tell you all.. this is a true story. For the record. I never really picked sides on this issue.. 'til now. I am a "why not try it and see sorta guy". Guess I am lucky I saw it instead of finding out a different way?

Conclusion: * USE THE RIVET STYLE LINK! *"
 

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2006 Honda CBR1000RR, 2008 Honda CRF230L, 2019 Honda CRF1000L
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No link, didn't happen!
 
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