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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I take my old chain off a vintage Honda CM450 that I just purchased, clean it spotless, and bring it to a local shop to see if it's good or bad. Bad is the verdict, so they order me a new one, Bikemaster XR 530 x 102 for $114. I think that seems steep, but didn't want to seem ungracious, so I paid. Later when I got home I realized the same chain is available all over the net for $35 less. Lesson learned, I forge on.

Today I realize the chain I took off had a clipped master link, but the new one is the rivet type. I looked at a couple of videos, and it seems the heavy chain breaker tool that is recommended by at least one shop costs more than the what I paid for the damn chain. Now, I don't expect to be breaking chains on a regular basis, so do I really need a $135 chain tool? And how many times can you take a chain off a bike before you create some damage? I got a sealed chain. I think this means o-rings. Is an XR type different from an OR type? And is the master link the link you always want to remove?
 

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The chain you are replacing was a sealed chain also, wasn't it. You could just put it on with your old master link and use the new o-rings. That would get you going immediately with no additional cost.
Order a spare master link for later, they won't have it in stock.

X or O refers to the shape of the rubber, makes little odds because they are all the same thickness anyway.
 

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Old meets new.
Once upon a time we used clips to connect the chain. Farmers still do on their manure spreaders and other machinery.
Some of us guys with a brown belt in farming, still use the old style chain. the modern saints of the world, look down on us because, well it is just not proper. Quoting my grumpy old aunt. That chain is a lot cheaper. Usually comes in ten foot lengths. You need a chain breaker, but not as Skookum ( Canadian word ) as the one required for the newer chains.

Fast forward and modern chains have O rings and other fancy stuff. Usually purchased with the correct number of links, and a joining link. You do have to learn how to burr the end of the joining link. Soo, get the correct number of links. If the bike shop sold you one a bit long, ask them to shorten it for you. Maybe also ask them how they burr the rivets. If they fail at this, they are not very user friendly.

I use lots of gooey oil, and do not adjust much, as in my chains are often a bit looser than others. But they last a long time, even the cheap one. The cheap on is on my XS400. The big bikes have the new fancy chains.
And I did run a drive chain on my manure spreader. UK
 

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Non sealed chain is often sold as race chain, should run you about 80 bucks instead of well over 100

To know if the chain is done or not next time, just lay it along side a new chain to compare the length and check for seized links.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The main thrust of my post is whether I need to buy an expensive heavy duty chain tool that will last more than two or three uses, according to one or two videos I have seen.

Frankly, I am leaning towards getting a matching clip style master link. It is what came on the bike when it was new, and is referenced in the shop manual. I like the idea of being able to remove the chain if I want to. And I know they say there is a danger of a clipped link coming free and causing mayhem, but I am not so sure I am fearing that so much, given my conservative riding style.
 

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The main thrust of my post is whether I need to buy an expensive heavy duty chain tool
Chain breaker tool? No. Not if you got the correct length chain.
Generally you should never need to remove a drive chain until it is time to replace it.
You will need a tool to make the rivet connection. A simple inexpensive one that works is all you need.
Clip connecters come apart. Chain breaks engine case. Rivet connecter good.

S F
 

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I am going to be a little different than the the others. To me, the chain is the most important part of that bike. I just replaced the chain on mine about two months ago. It is always better to buy a new chain a bit longer than you need so you can fit it exactly the way it should be. Most modern chains(o-ring) are riveted together. Mine is a 530 chain. It is very important you buy the correct chain breaker and will make your job a lot easier. A cheap one will do what all cheap things do. It won't squish(technical term) down the rivets properly and you will wind up having to buy a new master link. This is one of those projects that you must do right and if can't or won't, take it to someone who can and happily pay the money. If you want to do it yourself(bravo) then invest in the good tools. It just is what it is. If that chain breaks at speed it can throw you off the bike, it can gash your back leg or just simply leave your stranded. Clips have been known to come off. A properly riveted chain will not. Just my do it yourself two cents advice..
 

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If you are going to put a regular roller chain on the bike instead of a maintenance free chain you certainly don't want to rivet it on, that would make it very difficult and expensive to regularly clean and lubricate the chain.

To break a chain all you need is a grinder or file to take the heads off the rivets and now you have a shorter chain.

The cir-clip might come off and you could have a disaster if you install the cir-clip backwards. If they didn't work when installed correctly, then there would be an awful lot more dirt bikes out there with riveted chains.
 

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We are talking about road bikes with a lot more power than a toy dirt bike. It's easy to take a chain apart. Putting it back together properly requires a bit more finesse.
 

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We are talking about road bikes with a lot more power than a toy dirt bike. It's easy to take a chain apart. Putting it back together properly requires a bit more finesse.
:LOL: How often does your stupid road bike chain smash on rocks, get tangled with sticks and logs, or dragged through deep mud and gravel? No way will your chain ever see the side loads and impacts that a dirt bike experiences on a daily basis, and it's the side loads that are going to make that chain link come apart, not your immense tensile stress.

... and dude I have a chain driven motorcycle that has more horses then your horses, you really don't have anything special there.
 

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:LOL: How often does your stupid road bike chain smash on rocks, get tangled with sticks and logs, or dragged through deep mud and gravel? No way will your chain ever see the side loads and impacts that a dirt bike experiences on a daily basis, and it's the side loads that are going to make that chain link come apart, not your immense tensile stress.

... and dude I have a chain driven motorcycle that has more horses then your horses, you really don't have anything special there.
An improperly put together chain will come apart. That is why I was stressing he gets the right chain breaker and doing it properly. Why are you always making up stuff? I never said I had anything special...... dude.
 

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.... Why are you always making up stuff? I never said I had anything special...... dude.
Well excuse me but you said: "We are talking about road bikes with a lot more power than a toy dirt bike."

You want to see stress on a chain, sit a tiny rock on the chain between the sprocket teeth and the chain links and roll it around, and I don't care how big the bike is, you're going to witness some significant power happening there.
 

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Well excuse me but you said: "We are talking about road bikes with a lot more power than a toy dirt bike."

You want to see stress on a chain, sit a tiny rock on the chain between the sprocket teeth and the chain links and roll it around, and I don't care how big the bike is, you're going to witness some significant power happening there.
Sooooo, where did I mention my bike like you said I did? I said road bikes.................LMAO... torque is different than horsepower....Do you think I have never ridden a dirtbike?.....I was riding dirt bikes probably before you were even born. You sure are defensive about your toy bike.
 

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Sooooo, where did I mention my bike like you said I did? I said road bikes.................LMAO... torque is different than horsepower....Do you think I have never ridden a dirtbike?.....I was riding dirt bikes probably before you were even born. You sure are defensive about your toy bike.
No man you are not that old or trained or experienced.
Feel free to post without making it a reply to my post, otherwise expect a response.
 

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No man you are not that old or trained or experienced.
Feel free to post without making it a reply to my post, otherwise expect a response.
I don't give a flying' fart if you respond.... LMAO...there ya go agin, making stuff up... I never said how I was trained or experienced. As far as age, I am 62. What is your age? I said I was probably riding dirt bikes before you were born, that's all I said. It doesn't bode well when someone(yourself) has to make stuff up to make your argument. You keep inferring stuff, you shouldn't do that.
 

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66 and bought first bike at age 10, never stopped riding since.
riding competition motorcycles since 1976
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
OK, let's stick with my question please?

'82 bike came with a vanilla 530 chain with clip master link. Bike shop sold me a 530 x 102 link Bikemaster XR sealed chain with a rivet master link. A couple of videos I have watched say you must buy the $100+ heavy pro style chain tool if you want to get more than a couple of uses out of it. THAT was my question, do I need to follow that advice, or is there a more economical tool that will suit my needs for a rivet link?

Also, Bikemaster sells a clip on sealed master link for that chain, why couldn't I use that? A clip on master link is what came new with the bike, and it shows no sign of ever coming off. Also, I have never heard of one coming of of anyone's bike that I know of. I realize that it must be installed correctly, and am aware of the damage a thrown chain can cause. But I like the idea of being able to remove a chain if I need to/want to.

So, your opinion please, on rivet or clip on, and if rivet only is a definite must, your choice of rivet tool?
 
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