Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,458 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was looking at some motorcycle camping photos on the net today, and thinking back on some rides/camping trips I've enjoyed. I suppose it was probably a picture I saw that started me a thinking about the weather that's part of every ride.

Years ago I planned a trip to the Grand Canyon. I was hoping the wife could take some vacation time and come with me, and I hoped some guys at work could get off and come too. Seemed like everyone wanted to go, but no one could get off. So I went by myself.
My plan was to get there as fast as I could, then take a different route back home at a slower pace.

I hoped to make it to New Mexico the first day and Arizona on the second day. So that meant I-40 across Oklahoma and Texas then in to New Mexico. Back then, in my younger days, I could see a lot better and riding after dark didn't concern me that much. Well, I stayed at it pretty steady but I did stop when I needed too and probably made a few stops I didn't absolutely need to make.

Anyhow, it was dark as I was crossing the Texas panhandle. Then way off in the distance, and a bit south, I started seeing lightening light up the skies. I bumped my speed up a little and I remember thinking "I hope I can get by that little storm before it reaches the interstate." It didn't seem like 15 minutes and I started seeing lightening on the north side of the interstate. Well I'm gonna get wet.

Just as I got to the Texas/New Mexico border, the rain hit. Turned out to not be much more than a heavy drizzle. I stopped and filled the tank in the first fair size town and 20 maybe 30 minutes later the stars were shining.

Have you ever been able to out run a storm? Or just get out of the way of a storm?
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
21,101 Posts
Yes I have and sometimes I win and sometimes I lose big time. I've seen a guy hit by lightning so prefer to not ride during that stuff but I have been caught in it anyway trying to out run it or go around a storm. Most of the time it's best not to try. But we do have pop-up showers all the during the summer so depending on how fast they are moving, the race is on. That puts me back to my first statement here.:LOL::ROFLMAO::LOL:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Retired Guy

·
Visionary
Joined
·
3,620 Posts
I've dodged a few but most of the time they get me, I just grin and keep riding. A great example was 3 years ago on Easter Sunday I was riding home from work for Easter dinner, not a cloud in the sky. In the distance it got dark, then really dark, then I rode into a 5 minute deluge, it was like the end of the world, I was riding past all the cars and trucks that pulled over..I choose to keep moving, not stop and be a target. Then out the other side of the storm into bright sunshine.
It impressed me enough that I posted about it at the time...
 
  • Like
Reactions: Retired Guy

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
21,101 Posts
People will say BS but I have been riding in the rain on my side of the road and drivers on the other side of the divided road was in the clear. Was down around Houston the last time I was in those conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,458 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I'll not call BS on it, although I haven't seen it. I have seen the line across a road where it was wet on one side, dry on the other because of rain. If the road had been going the other direction, why couldn't one lane be dry and the other wet?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,458 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Was that guy riding when he got hit by lightening? Makes me want to change my answer on another thread about what I worry about when riding.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,626 Posts
People will say BS but I have been riding in the rain on my side of the road and drivers on the other side of the divided road was in the clear. Was down around Houston the last time I was in those conditions.
Flip a U-ee and go the other way. ?
U turn
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,597 Posts
Our local W Gs are using a WA warning on the local weather reports. A real risk of flooding starting Thursday thru Friday. WG are weather guessers or weather guys. WA is Washington state and it is for the top left, North West of the state, or just down the road from where I am. It was raining heavy earlier but has eased.
Shirley and I are going to do a mini pub crawl in D T Vancouver tomorrow. Bus and train to get there and back. Walk one of the main streets while Down Town. D T where all the lights are bright, sung by Petula Clark, a neighbour in Epsom England. We will wear our rain coats. Probably rain on both sides of the road. Some pubs are odd numbered, some even, so we will be careful. No cages allowed on the D T street, Just a few buses.

UK
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
21,101 Posts
Was that guy riding when he got hit by lightening? Makes me want to change my answer on another thread about what I worry about when riding.
Yes he was. Knocked him off as well.
Flip a U-ee and go the other way. ?
U turn
I did. Figured I was getting too close to Houston anyway so went back north.
 

·
On The Road Again!
Joined
·
3,265 Posts
My brother and I met a guy back in the 70s who told us a story about lightning that we never forgot.
Seems he was riding his sportster near Morristown airport with his buddy on the back when he heard a deafening boom.
A bolt of lightning took his friend right off the back seat and killed him instantly.
He, the driver, never felt a thing, but his buddy died.
Never forgot that. Don't ride when lightning is near.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,458 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I've never liked riding in the rain. For a long time the worst part was, a half dozen drops could fall out of the sky and three of them would land on my glasses. One on the inside! And I'd be half blinded.

Wet roads weren't really that big a concern, just adjust speed to conditions, but meeting/following cars and trucks and the spray thrown up was/is,...annoying.

Now I've rode down the highways and watched the lightening, sometimes it was close enough to hear the thunder, but now I'm having seconds thoughts about doing that again.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
21,101 Posts
Now I've rode down the highways and watched the lightening, sometimes it was close enough to hear the thunder, but now I'm having seconds thoughts about doing that again.
If you can hear the thunder you are close enough to be struck by the lightning. Every watched a golf game when they hear thunder in the distance? You should do the same. Don't panic but find a place to wait it out. Normally that thunderstorm will pass rather quickly so you'll have just a short delay. (y) (y) (y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,458 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I don't watch golf, but I know around here, if anyone hears thunder, or sees lightening, they'll shut down the high school and college football games.

I think I might keep riding if I see lightening off in the distance, (maybe stop and check the weather radar, find a route away from it) but if unavoidable, just get off somewhere until the worst has passed.

If a storm settles down in to just a steady rain, without all the fireworks, get in the rain suit and go again.
:unsure:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
734 Posts
Maybe I better change my ways.....If I see lightening, hear thunder and yet see no rain, I grab my camera and try and get some pictures.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,597 Posts
We were told for every second, the lightning is one mile away. More correct. For every 5 seconds the lightning is one mile way. If you count to two seconds, it is darn close. Counting can also determine if it is getting closer.

UK
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,597 Posts
I rounded it for the general audience. It is a lot closer than what we had been told, and that was my point. Or more specifically for folks to look it up, which you did.

When it gets to be one or two seconds, I do not think folks are going to be using decimals, as they were likely not using a stop watch, which can be a chore when running scared.

How many times have you been zapped?

UK
 

·
On The Road Again!
Joined
·
3,265 Posts
In pilot training school, the FAA teaches us that lightning can strike as far as ten miles horizontally from the storm that generates it.
So...
It could be a perfectly clear day where you are, but a storm ten miles away could zap you!
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top