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ZAMM Fanatic
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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, what's the most impressive roadside repair you've performed, or witnessed?

Mine was bringing a dead Indian back to life.



I'd recently acquired my CBR929 and was feeling great brotherhood with riders of ALL makes. I was zooming from Durango down to Farmington when I saw a fellow rider broken down on the side of the road outside Aztec NM.

He told me his bike had suddenly died on him headed down the road. He already had covers off so I could see fuses, wires, battery terminals, etc. It was a newer Indian.

Seemed nervous, antsy, typical of someone on drugs or in trouble....had to wonder if the bike was even his...

He wasn't too sure about letting me take a look at first, but...

First step: Determine if it's a fuel or ignition problem. Check the obvious, and EASIEST to check things first. I opened the gas cap and could see fuel sloshing. At least we could rule out being out of gas.

Next step: Turn the ignition switch on.

No ignition light, no headlight when you turned the key/switch. Obviously a power problem, perhaps a blown main fuse.

First step in ALL electrical diagnosis is to confirm you've got a good source of power --- a charged battery.

"Got any little pieces of wire?"

"No."

"Ok I'll be right back..."

So I walked down the side of the highway until I found a piece of wire lying there. Didn't have to go more than 100'. Stripped some insulation off the ends using my teeth as I walked back.

Come back and hold one end to battery minus (B-), touch the other end to B+ and sure enough, it made good sparks.

Ok, battery is good, so it could be loose battery terminal connections, main fuse, or ignition switch. Or a loose or missing B- to frame ground.

Battery terminals are tight and no visible corrosion. B+ has 4AWG or whatever going to the starter, and a secondary wire headed elsewhere.

I have him hold the clutch in and I touched B+ to the starter solenoid. Motor spins. Battery has good amperage as well as voltage, and the battery terminal connections are not the problem. Starter is grounded to the frame, so that connection's good as well.

Then I spot it. A blue 3M crimp-on wire splice on the secondary wire coming off B+, with the stepchild wire headed up to the area of the ignition switch. Those @#[email protected]#!~!! things either fail to make a connection, or sever the wire they're supposedly splicing into at least 50% of the time. (At least 1/3 of the time the person who installed it is responsible because they used the WRONG SIZE splice for that particular AWG (size) wire.)



Using a knife I open the connector shell, and touch B+ to the 3rd wire. Dashboard lights up. "There's your problem" I announce.

Throw away the 3M crimp, sever the spliced-into wire, strip and twist all 3 ends together. Can't remember anymore but somehow we insulated it.

Bike cranks, starts, and runs. Head and dash lights. Shut it back down.

Elapsed time: Less than 10 minutes.

The friend with the truck rolls up as we are re-installing the covers. No ramp. Kinda wonder how they were planning on getting it in the bed. ;)
 

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That's a good story. It's great when it is something simple.

Maybe they were planning to lift it up into the truck. Good luck on that.
 

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Gone.
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Earlier this summer a friend of mine's bike suddenly wouldn't start while on vacation up in the mountains. He called me and gave me a very exact description of what it was doing. I pulled out a wiring diagram, called him back, and had him check a few things as I talked him through it on the phone. The suspect was the ignition switch itself, so I was able to tell him how to turn the wiring plug over, shave off the ear with a pocket knife, plug it in backwards, and run the bike off the accessories circuit instead of the ignition circuit. That got him through the rest of his trip.

Not the most interesting repair in itself, but the first one I've ever done from almost 800 miles away.:)
 

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Pegasus trapped in a human body on a motorcycle
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Probably wont count as a roadside repair, but I have done a full valve job on my old Shadow 750 on the side of the road out in front of my house. (The parking lot I normally park in to work on the bike was full of out-of-state cars)

Actual fixes done on the side of the road... two.

Had one of my slip-on mufflers pull itself off the header. (was a reoccurring issue too, for some reason) Once the header cooled enough not to turn my hand into the meaty portion of a Wendy's burger, I got them back together, drilled a hole through where the header and slip-on connect, put a set screw in, and put the clamp over. It aint separated since.

The other roadside repair I did was for a guy on his CB-550 who rode all the way up from Florida. He had sprung a fuel leak, and when we pulled the tank off, one of the fuel lines was split pretty bad. Well, the tank vent lines seem rather excessively long, and we only needed a short piece... It got the job done, at least to limp the bike to his friend's house.
 

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Save them all!
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I broke a clutch cable several years ago - this got me home.



I now carry a pinch bolt I made on each bike, just in case I need it.
 

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I broke a clutch cable several years ago - this got me home.


I now carry a pinch bolt I made on each bike, just in case I need it.
I had the same problem about 2 yrs ago but the only thing I could find was a coder pin and some how I was able to make it work.
Is that an 80's kawiasaki? Cuz that looks like the same dash that was on the bike that did it to me.
 

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Save them all!
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I had the same problem about 2 yrs ago but the only thing I could find was a coder pin and some how I was able to make it work.
Is that an 80's kawiasaki? Cuz that looks like the same dash that was on the bike that did it to me.
That bike was a 77 Goldwing. I broke two clutch cables on that bike - started carrying a spare!
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Vice grips on a throttle cable to get me home. Been there done that.
 

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Not at all impressive but I had the shifter fall off of my Road Glide. I was able to get it back on and functional after I retraced my path a few hundred feet to find my missing shifter and did the repair with nothing but the HD "standard" tool kit. That's right, the cheapo tools that come with the bike.
 
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