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A couple of days ago I tried changing the oil on my 79 gs850. It's a project bike that I recently got running and I wanted to make it in ridable condition as the oil inside was really old and worn. While taking out the bolt I learned that the oil pan had been stripped. I bought a tap which I've never used before and begun working. I kept using my wrench to tighten it up and when it got a bit tight a gave it a nice nug and heard the scary screech sound you hear when you torque too hard. I immediately stopped, took out the tap, and checked the threads. The threads actually appeared to look very clean however when I stuck my finger inside the oil pan I felt a small divot from what must've been from the tap. Now I can't help but feel worried thinking damn did I just mess up the first project that I just got running? What possible damages could I be dealing with? Are they major damages? I'm waiting on parts so I won't be able to test out the bike yet, any information is greatly appreciated :)

Thanks!
 

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Chances are good the tap just got dry of what little lubrication you might have had from the drained oil and screeched telling you that. But exactly what do you mean you could feel a divot? Divots are not good in threads so what is this divot you speak of? I'd run the tap in and out a few more times at any rate just to make sure the threads are clean. I'd also flush everything out with some kerosine too to remove any metal chips. Let it drain as long as you can to get rid of the kerosine before adding fresh oil.
 

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Do you mean you screwed the tap in so far you hit an internal part of the engine and put a divot ( your term) in it? That could be insignificant or disasterous depending on what you hit...
 

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In the future....don't tap your first hole on the good part. Look at the tap and use the proper drill size for it. Drill a hole in a wood block first, and tap it. Yes you can tap wood and it's great to learn on because it's soft and cuts easy. Then test the threads with the bolt. Move on to aluminum then steel. This applies to all things. try them in a scrap part first. A tap too is just part of the threading system. You need a proper tap handle and in some cases a tap follower to keep it strait.

BTW. You can tap wood and use it to fasten boards together. After you tap the hole, apply some super glue. Let it dry and re-tap it. Called chasing it, which is essentially what you did with your fix, which is fine in many cases. This might not be good for all wood joining but it is in some cases. I've used it. There is also three different types of taps. Some are starter taps some are finishing taps. Make sure you are using the right kind.
 

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Pretty much all of the above, especially the squeaky part. Aluminium alloy can gawl up when a stainless tap is used. Back it off, use some lube and try again. Could also be the drill bit used is slightly small. UK
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Chances are good the tap just got dry of what little lubrication you might have had from the drained oil and screeched telling you that. But exactly what do you mean you could feel a divot? Divots are not good in threads so what is this divot you speak of? I'd run the tap in and out a few more times at any rate just to make sure the threads are clean. I'd also flush everything out with some kerosine too to remove any metal chips. Let it drain as long as you can to get rid of the kerosine before adding fresh oil.
I meant as if I were to stick my finger straight up the oil pan from the drain plug hole, past all the threads till I hit the top, I feel a little divot there compared to the surrounding (flat) surface. I assume it must've been from the tap. The threads themselves are good there are no divots on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Do you mean you screwed the tap in so far you hit an internal part of the engine and put a divot ( your term) in it? That could be insignificant or disasterous depending on what you hit...
Yes, I screwed the tap in deep and felt a small divot at the top. I Immediately stopped going any further.
 

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The tap is flat on the end. The bits inside the engine, at the bottom are hard steel. The tap can not make a dent or scratch in the steel. The crank may have areas that have been drilled a small amount for balancing. BUT, there might be some kind of filter screen thingy in there. Check the parts book. UK
 

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Directly above the oil drain bolt goes inside the engine is a oil strainer screen. You most likely ran the tap in to far and the end of the tap pushed the center of the screen up a bit, that's probably the indentation your feeling. I really doubt you do any real damage to the screen, just pushed the center of the screen up so it's concaved a bit. Just make sure you get all the aluminum bits out that may have worked their way up when you tapped it. Personally, I'd see if a new pan gasket is available, buy it, drop the pan, clean it, new gasket , pan back on, put the screws back in using the the torque spec and pattern. The attached screen shot is for a 79 GS850.
 

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I used a tap for the first time last week as I had the same issue on my Tacoma, albeit with my transmission drain bolt and pan, not my oil. Love messing around with a "sealed" transmission! I would strongly encourage you to drop the pan to not only inspect the divot, but also to make sure there are no metal shavings from running the tap.

Next time, make sure you coat the tap with oil and go very slowly, backing it out frequently to clean up any and all metal.
 
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