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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I'd like to get a good mic for me to take voice notes, etc. during a ride. I'd like jack it into a smartphone, or perhaps use Bluetooth. However, I do not need speakers; I don't plan to take calls or do person-to-person radio. I appreciate any and all opinions.

Thanks!
 

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Nightfly
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If you're just looking for a mic to take notes with while riding I would not spend much money. You can find several at Amazon under $25. They would record direct to your iphone no problem. If quality is not a factor let price be your guide
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I should've asked the right question. :) I'd like to be able to record my voice well enough to "mix" it with video from my helmet cam and perhaps even post it to YouTube. The camera's audio gets washed out above 10MPH. I can afford to spend a reasonable amount. I use an Android phone.
 

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Nightfly
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Quality audio is ‘70%’ of your video. It is THE most important aspect of first-rate video production. The quality of your audio is what will make the difference as a professional or an amateur. I'm not quite sure what you intend on doing with your video. If for fun that's one thing, if you want to be serious, then expect to spend some serious coin.

A foam windscreen is a good idea but is only effective in reducing/eliminating wind noise in wind speeds of 10 mph or less. It’s best in gentle winds. It’s also best to keep at least your foam windscreen on your mike at all times unless you’re using a ‘dead cat’ or ‘zeppelin.’ A better choice are the ‘furry’ windscreens from companies such as Rycote http://www.rycote.com/ or RØDE http://www.rodemicrophones.com/. ‘Furry’ windscreens are capable of eliminating wind noise at wind speeds up to 20 mph.

For wind speeds higher than 20 mph you’re gonna need a zeppelin (RØDE calls them blimps) covered with a ‘dead cat’, http://www.rodemicrophones.com/accessory.php?product=DeadCat (seriously, that’s what they’re called). A good shock mount for the microphone helps to eliminate ‘handling noise.’

If you're going the professional route do not scrimp on the cost of your mike. Get the very best one you can afford. If you're looking to keep cost down look at mikes from RØDE, Audio Technica and Sennheiser. If you’ve got some serious coin, look at mikes from Sanken, Schoeps or again Sennheiser. Remember, as a professional, the quality of your audio will make or break your video.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I'm envisioning talking about a variety of topics as I'm commuting to and from work. I'd want it to pick up my voice, while still allowing a small amount of ambient noise.

How much of a difference is made in wind noise if the mic is mounted within the helmet? Also, is a throat mic a feasible option?
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Better yet, you could always dub in the voice-over audio after the video is shot, making it crystal clear.
That is certainly true. However, that then requires me to spend time before or after the ride to do it. Doing the audio during the ride (sync'd with the video) would also lend an element of reality that a voiceover would lack.

On a related note, I welcome advice on software to use for syncing and mixing the audio+video into a YouTube-able product - Windows or Linux, please.
 

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Nightfly
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Your call but I wouldn't waste time with a throat mic. Throat mic's were conceived for Navy carrier planes in ww2 because the ambient cockpit noise was hundreds of times louder than the loudest the pilot could ever hope to shout. Unless you are working with this kind of environment you do not need or want a throat mic.

The best thing about a throat mic is they don't pick up the sounds around you, the Nazi's used them for tank communications, which is what they are best suited for, not good for simple audio recording

Check out what the local motorcycle cops use, most have a simple speaker mic. You're making this much harder than it really is..
 

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That is certainly true. However, that then requires me to spend time before or after the ride to do it.
Taking the time to properly produce a video will make a huge difference in the watchability. Having a good planned script, sharp editing, and thought-out production will be the difference between someone closing the page after 10 seconds and having them watch all the way through.

There are thousands of ride videos out there that are simply just too boring to watch. The ones with an improvised monologue are often embarrassingly bad.

If you have something of substance to say, or a valid point to get across, it's worth taking the time to put a good effort into it.
 

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Nightfly
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All valid points Dods. I was going by his original post, he wanted a mic to take "notes" while riding." Didn't sound like wanting to make a professional video. I'll step back and he can reseach what he wants, and think about what he wants to do... I know sound and there are a hundred ways to go. It's all about how much money to spend and the quality of the finished product.
 

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Crashes get views, but they can be painful and expensive.

Captain Crash Idaho makes a lot of worthwhile videos, all well done, to the point, and very watchable. He doesn't crash too often.
 

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American Legion Rider
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Crashes get views, but they can be painful and expensive.

Captain Crash Idaho makes a lot of worthwhile videos, all well done, to the point, and very watchable. He doesn't crash too often.
And his comments are made after the video recording. It would seem to me if the action is so boring a person doesn't want to take the time to watch it and do a good voice over, just how much am I going to want to watch it? Not much. Not that I watch them anyway. I do it. Not watch it.:thumbsup:
 

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This!!! I used to do audio-video, and we had $300 microphones mounted on booms, hand held over the heads of the people on camera - just in normal room or work environments - no road sound, no wind sound, etc. And it still NEVER sounds as good as voiceover, applied in post-production, under controlled conditions!

The vast majority of what you see in movies and on television is done with voiceover. In most of those, the synchronous audio track is used only to make it easier and faster for the sound engineer(s) to place the voiceovers onto the track, and for comparison purposes, to assist in obtaining "natural sound", based on the environment, etc.

Sometimes, to save money, no synchronous audio track is recorded, a technique called "MOS" - this is done much more in Europe and Asia, where synchronous audio is little used. Or used to be. I don't know what they do now. I've been out of it for a decade.

Better yet, you could always dub in the voice-over audio after the video is shot, making it crystal clear.
 

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A legend in his own mind
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Do a you tube search for moto vlogging, or needed to start moto-vlogging. You'll find lots of helpful information. A lot of the bigger vloggers out there have made a video of what they use and suggest
 

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I've been using a Sony wireless mic/receiver the receiver is plugged into the phone Jack, mic clipped on. Still pick up wind noise but much less. Mic comes with a felt wind sock.
 
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