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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Nice
 

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SUPER MODERATOR
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the video!

Sam:grin:
 

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Interesting - rotary engine on the front wheel. I can't imagine what the gyroscopic forces are like..
 

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Very Famous Person
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I love the wonderful smooth flowing design. It reminds me of an Indian.

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Nope no clutch. According to the owners manual, if you come to a situation that you need to stop for, you should "orbit in circles" until you can go again ROTFLMAO
So not a commuter bike.
 
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Depends on the commute I guess...
 

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That's insane. LOL.

Well, you have some German engineers who end up making things like BMW's and high tech medical equipment and so forth. Then you have these guys. After Mergola floundered they probably emigrated and went to Greenland to try their hand at Chinchilla farming or something.
 

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So long
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@Porky, great post.

I've worked with some brilliant German software engineers. They always seemed to be part mad scientist and part adventurer, but in a good way.

@Eye_m_no_angel, at least one of the Megola founders seemed to be a genuine motor-head. The kind of guy that was always building something. According to Wikipedia, one of the Megola founders, Fritz Cockerell, was a machinist in an airship factory, then in steam turbine construction, then moved to Rapp Motorenwerke, which later became Bayerische Motorenwerke (BMW), where he worked as a test engineer. Then he founded the Megola works. Then he developed an eight-cylinder two-stroke engine for a "German people-determined sports car" and a four-cylinder two-stroke engine, which was used for installation in a few prototypes of a car and a two-wheeler. Cockerell was more successful with auxiliary bike engines and light motorcycles, which were considered very reliable and sold under his own name. He later devoted himself to research on diesel engines for aircraft, turbine engines, and the Wankel engine.
 

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That's interesting, Oz. Thanks for posting. So the guy was into about everything that crossed his path and interested him. Sounds like he actually would have been an interesting dude.

I've got some German engineers and architects and people of that stripe in my family. With one exception they are some seriously insufferable ego-bags.
 
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