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Sharing this story as a bit of a personal endeavor. It was a great experience, and wanted to share my thoughts for other newer riders out there. Here is a quick intro, and then link below.

Trips like this always sound like such a great idea… You have somewhere you need to be in a certain time frame, and the weather looks clear. There are important personal matters requiring resolution on a Monday morning, and with my initial plan to fly now gone askew, I was staring into the driveway at the Africa Twin and pondering. How hard could it be, right?

All told, I still call myself a rookie rider. I spent some time riding dirt bikes as a teen and spent a couple of years licensed and riding in Vancouver, though that chapter came to a close in 2005. Riding again extensively for a touch over a year now (with some professional instruction along the way to dust off those old skills), I’m on the road a lot, though miles from ever calling myself a seasoned/veteran rider. Prior to this potentially overzealous undertaking, I’d never logged more than a couple continuous riding hours in a day.

https://www.motorcycle.com/features/me-the-africa-twin-1000-miles-and-3-days.html
 

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Your link isn't working, but Porky has already linked it in another thread.
 

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I liked the story. And after a lot of cross country travel, over many years, I have still been known to leave things behind that I know better than to leave behind, like underwear. :) :) :)
 

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One of the things he touches on is fatigue management – almost always is a factor at some level on longer rides (and “longer” is often relative based on rider and equipment). First of course, it to reduce fatigue as much as possible – cold/heat, dehydration and discomfort are some of the usual fatigue generators, and it sounded like he tested each a bit. Other factors are just things that surprise you on the trip – traffic, construction, mechanical issues, unexpected weather, etc., can all add to it… usually is not a huge factor until one gets out around 1000 miles a day, but at that point even experienced riders can find themselves doing stupid stuff… (I dropped my Nomad about 18 hours into a 20-something hour ride – forgot to put the kickstand down at a gas-pump because I was fixated on a LEO cruiser sitting nearby – adrenaline is wonderful… stepped of the mess, and yanked it back up where it belonged before the officer got curious enough to investigate – decided I needed to take a short break tho’ – which turn out to be a story in itself…).
 
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