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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Sorry. Been away too long. Going to invest in this setup in a couple weeks; https://theusatrailerstore.com/lumina-diamond-xl-motorcycle-trailer/, Yamaha hitch 218-2, Wiring Converters.

I realize Vito was looking into one of these units a couple years ago but not sure if he went thru with it. Would love to be able to put my camping gear in this trailer that I normally put in my ATV trailer.



Not having to worry about finding a motel is a big plus. Whenever I go to MC rally's the cost of a motel room is just outrageous. I know there are a lot of nicer units out there but for considerably more money. Any input is appreciated. Thanks.
 

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Buddy of mine has a cargo and a camper trailer for his Goldwing. He uses the camper quite often. You'll have to post a pic once you get it all hooked up.
 

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I wonder about the dynamics of riding a bike with the pole trailer behind it.

What kind of forces or influences does pulling a trailer with a motorcycle introduce?

What compensations does the driver have to make to accommodate pulling a trailer with two wheeled vehicle?

??????
 

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I wonder about the dynamics of riding a bike with the pole trailer behind it.

What kind of forces or influences does pulling a trailer with a motorcycle introduce?

What compensations does the driver have to make to accommodate pulling a trailer with two wheeled vehicle?

??????
That's a good question!

I've seen MC's pulling trailers before, but never thought about what it does to the riding dynamics. ❓❓

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I wonder about the dynamics of riding a bike with the pole trailer behind it.

What kind of forces or influences does pulling a trailer with a motorcycle introduce?

What compensations does the driver have to make to accommodate pulling a trailer with two wheeled vehicle?

??????
Waaaay back in 1974 I built my own trailer to pull behind my BMW.
In those days you just about NEVER saw a trailer behind a bike.
So I guess I was a kind of pioneer. I put over 6,000 miles on that
trailer with no problems.
My own personal rule is that the loaded trailer should not weigh more
than half of what the bike does. You don't want the tail wagging the dog.
My trailer loaded weighed about 250 pounds.
To answer your question, Soupy, the biggest influence on the bike is in
stopping distance. You have to allow for it. You have all that extra weight
trying to push you through the red light. :)
At normal riding speeds, even through the twisties, you should hardly
know that it's behind you. As long as you are on the throttle through
the turns the bike will behave almost normally. However, if you hit the
brakes while in a turn, that trailer will try to straighten you up, so you
have to be ready for it. The most difficult thing is tight turns at
parking lot speeds. The trailer is now at an acute angle to the bike
and as you add throttle, it wants to pull you down. I only had mine
pull me over once that I remember.
Pulling the trailer is like anything else, be more careful, drive a little
more slowly, and always remember that it's back there and you
will be fine.
My homebuilt trailer has been gathering dust in my shed for years
now. My recently acquired Goldwing has a trailer hitch on it. It may be about
time to get that trailer out and clean it up and use it again.
And it should pull MUCH easier behind the Goldwing than it did behind
the BMW. The beemer weighed about 550 pounds and was 900cc.
The Goldwing weighs 900 pounds with 1500 cc. I should hardly know
that it's back there.
 

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..................To answer your question, Soupy, the biggest influence on the bike is instopping distance. You have to allow for it. You have all that extra weighttrying to push you through the red light. :)
At normal riding speeds, even through the twisties, you should hardly
know that it's behind you. As long as you are on the throttle through
the turns the bike will behave almost normally. However, if you hit the
brakes while in a turn, that trailer will try to straighten you up, so you
have to be ready for it. The most difficult thing is tight turns at
parking lot speeds. The trailer is now at an acute angle to the bike
and as you add throttle, it wants to pull you down................
I'm thinking about the leaning into the turns factor...........the hitch would have to have the ability to roll in the socket, right? Otherwise the trailer will come up on one wheel, yes?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
..................To answer your question, Soupy, the biggest influence on the bike is instopping distance. You have to allow for it. You have all that extra weighttrying to push you through the red light.

At normal riding speeds, even through the twisties, you should hardly
know that it's behind you. As long as you are on the throttle through
the turns the bike will behave almost normally. However, if you hit the
brakes while in a turn, that trailer will try to straighten you up, so you
have to be ready for it. The most difficult thing is tight turns at
parking lot speeds. The trailer is now at an acute angle to the bike
and as you add throttle, it wants to pull you down................
I'm thinking about the leaning into the turns factor...........the hitch would have to have the ability to roll in the socket, right? Otherwise the trailer will come up on one wheel, yes?
It has a swivel hitch between the tongue and the coupler.
 

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I'm thinking about the leaning into the turns factor...........the hitch would have to have the ability to roll in the socket, right? Otherwise the trailer will come up on one wheel, yes?
Soupy, my homemade trailer has a regular ball hitch. I have never had
any trouble leaning into the turns, and I'm a fairly aggressive rider.
A regular ball hitch allows the bike to lean a lot further than you
would think was possible.
The only time the ball had a problem was the one time that the bike
fell over with the trailer attached. Amazingly, the coupler on the trailer
just popped off of the ball before the bike hit the ground. No damage
to either the bike or the trailer. I just picked up the bike, hooked up
the trailer again and got back on the road.
Most of the commercial trailers have a swiveling coupler. With those
trailers, you'd have no trouble at all. The trailer would just stay
attached if the bike fell over.
 

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Offcenter said:
My homebuilt trailer has been gathering dust in my shed for years
now. My recently acquired Goldwing has a trailer hitch on it. It may be about
time to get that trailer out and clean it up and use it again.
Be sure you repack those wheel bearings. It's something many neglect.
 

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Isn't it going to be hard to pull on that pallet? You may have to get some wheels for it.
 

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Be sure you repack those wheel bearings. It's something many neglect.
I will probably REPLACE those bearings, considering how long that
trailer has been sitting. Best I can figure, it's been sitting unused in
my shed for about 20 years now. Probably will need new tires too.
 

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Although many won't use it anymore, gasoline will clean them up just fine and I doubt seriously if they are shot. But new would be easier. I'd still repack the new ones. What they come with is just to keep them from rusting.
 
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Looks great!
 

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Great looking combo
 
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