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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #1
I have been here long enough to know that we have cyclical topics in this (and most any other Forum), and so it's time for the "When Should I" Thread to open up (lol)..................

All Bike come with an Owners Manual, and if not, they can be retrieved online.
That said, perhaps we should, for the benefit of the "Newbs" out there, talk about out own habits when it comes to the following items:

A. Oil changes (and filter): How often?
B. Coolant checks and flushes (if applicable)
C. Chain cleaning,re-lube and tension check (Inspection as well)
D. Nuts-n-bolts tightness checks
E. Tire pressure checks
F. Lube of pivoting arms and Linkages
G. Fork Oil checks


By answering the above, (again and again it seems) we will be offering some rookie another opportunity to have at his/her fingertips, a fresh look at what it takes to keep a bike in good working order. I purposely didn't include checking the signal lights and brake lights and headlights, because we all know that we should do that before EVERY ride, right?!

-Soupy
 

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Gone.
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It's a good topic for conversation, but not really very helpful for a new rider.

The service intervals are different for different types of bikes, so should best be gotten from the owner's manuals. When I do what on my Harley, for example, doesn't have much relevance to what you should be doing on your Honda. Even among the same brand the intervals can be different for different models and different years. I think it's best to steer a new rider to the most accurate and reliable source for maintenance intervals, and that's the documentation provided by the manufacturer.
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #3
point taken.

-Soupy
 

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Both of you are correct. However, there are things newbs should get in the habit of doing. I know damn well that both of you do it, as do I.

Without even thinking about it, when I select a bike to ride, I am looking the bike over as I walk up to it. Kind of like a 'pre trip' inspection. Is the chain sagging? Gas/oil leaking on the ground? (Harleys don't count). Cotter pin in the rear axle? Nuts and bolts where they should be?

Now, you two may say that you don't, but if you really think about it, you will find that you do. It's something that comes with experience and years of riding.
 

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Well, maybe I better qualify that. The OLD Harleys like to mark their territory. At least my 66 has a bit of a continence problem.

I would imagine if I got ambitious I could find and fix it. But until then, I'll let the old girl just wet the floor. I mean really, a couple of drops per week doesn't put me in the 'panic' mode.
 

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A couple things l find myself doing every week or so are checking the tires and lubing the chain. My bike calls for it every 300 miles, so l just do it all the time. And l find that the more non-riding time l spend with her, the more l get to know her and the more comfortable l am with putting a wrench to her :)
 

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American Legion Rider
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I'd have to go with Eye on maintenance. Your owners manual is the go to place for that info. But what if you don't have one? For some reason there are a lot of bikes out there that don't have one. Somewhere along the line owners don't pass them on. Why I'll never know. Maybe they like them as trophies. But there are some general rules that can get you by. However, for some reason I thought it had already been discussed over and over in multiple threads. My go to is, when in doubt do.
 

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Gone.
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Well, maybe I better qualify that. The OLD Harleys like to mark their territory. At least my 66 has a bit of a continence problem.

I would imagine if I got ambitious I could find and fix it. But until then, I'll let the old girl just wet the floor. I mean really, a couple of drops per week doesn't put me in the 'panic' mode.
My '56 does too. But then, it's supposed to. Automatic primary chain oiling. :wink:
 

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I'd have to go with Eye on maintenance. Your owners manual is the go to place for that info. But what if you don't have one? For some reason there are a lot of bikes out there that don't have one. Somewhere along the line owners don't pass them on. Why I'll never know. Maybe they like them as trophies. But there are some general rules that can get you by. However, for some reason I thought it had already been discussed over and over in multiple threads. My go to is, when in doubt do.
I'm one of those who didn't get the manual passed down to me (though a Clymer book was included). But I easily found a PDF version of it online (2004 VStar 1100) and suspect that's true for most modern-era bikes.
 

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Swamp Rat Rider
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Definitely need a Manual to know the Internals for Fluid Changes .. But should work at learning things like Cables, Belt, Chain Adjustments, Kickstand Lube, Check Tire Pressures at least once a week .. Give a good Visual Inspection all over ( Easy to do when cleaning your Bike ) to where things like this become 2nd nature ..
 
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