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It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye
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Dealers will tell you just about anything to get you to use their oil. Mine tried to tell me I'd void my warranty if I used anything but HD oil. But this goes a bit far.
I'd have to see some test results before I believed something this ridiculous.:coffeescreen:

 

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MODERATOR
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The guy is full of der poopooen.

SAM:coffeescreen:
 

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American Legion Rider
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And you wouldn't say similar if you got paid what he did for that load feces?:p
 

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It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye
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Discussion Starter #6
And you wouldn't say similar if you got paid what he did for that load feces?:p
I would at least try not to sound like a total moron.;)
He even gets the weight wrong. Correct me if I'm wrong, Vics use a 20w40.
 

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Refract

So as well as the temperature for my beer, I should considering which beer refracts the heat, and has it break on through to the other side.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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A Harley riding friend of mine in Ca, from his first oil change on his Electra Glide always used cheap 10-40W Valvoline and the only thing he had to ever do was replace a noisy hydraulic lifter at 80,000 miles. probably $3 per quart stuff.

My HD's got only the best lubrication known to man at the time, at an average of $10 per quart.

I'm sure he laughed all the way to the bank.

Sam:biggrin:
 

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Driftless Rider
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I'm a fan of Victory and even I find many of the VOG videos to be quite ridiculous.
 

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I use Harley 20w50 Screaming Eagle synthetic in my XR1200, until the warranty is gone, around $11 a quart. When my extended warranty is done I will definitely find another cheaper synthetic of the same weight/grade for as cheap as I can.
 

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If you can't dazzle 'em with your brilliance, baffle 'em with your bull****.
 

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Gone.
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I use Harley 20w50 Screaming Eagle synthetic in my XR1200, until the warranty is gone, around $11 a quart. When my extended warranty is done I will definitely find another cheaper synthetic of the same weight/grade for as cheap as I can.
You can use any brand of oil that you'd like as long as it is of the weight, grade, and type required by the manufacturer, and it will not void your warranty. :)
 

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And like the commercial says, make sure it captures heat.

 

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My choice, not saying it is required for warranty compliance. The Victory guy hawking their oil as so much better because of heat reduction calling it "like coolant for the engine" is ignorant though. All oil does that to some extent especially in air/oil cooled engines. OK, I went to the online dictionary to define the word refraction, it refers to the "bending of light through a substance" such as light appears to change direction through a glass of water. Um, what does that have to do with reducing temperature in an engine with a liquid? I think I would rather have the heat radiated, as in out of the engine instead of bent through it.
 

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If I had a XR1200 I'd be extremely happy---I love that bike.

I'm on my 78th motorcycle/ scooter and I've never had a lubrication problem. I mean my bikes have never had a lubrication problem and I've used everything. This must say something about oil right??

When I raced 2 stroke bikes, for many, many years, the right oil could make the difference between finishing a race without seizing the engine up or loosing power on the top end. Some oil were very good lubricants but gummed the rings very easily requiring disassembly after every race.

In a violation of the Moss-Fergusson act, STIHL to this day requires their special "Ethanol fixer" 2 stroke oil to be used in their equipment or the warranty is no good. It is twice as much and I use it.

Sam:biggrin:
 

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So long
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...I went to the online dictionary to define the word refraction, it refers to the "bending of light through a substance" such as light appears to change direction through a glass of water. Um, what does that have to do with reducing temperature in an engine with a liquid?...
That particular online dictionary gave you an incomplete definition. The word refraction isn't limited to just light. It is also correct to use with sound and heat.

In steel mills and casting plants you'll hear engineers talk about heat refraction and refractory materials.

Refraction is a property of materials indicating their ability to withstand heat.

Refractory materials are used for lining furnaces, reactors, crucibles, etc.
 

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Just for the record, heat can be radiated as a form of light - ever used an infrared lamp? So, refraction and reflection are, technically, valid terms when used with heat conduction/extraction. But, in the context of oils, conduction is, by far, the primary path, and ALL synthetics conduct heat a little bit better than oil cracked from petroleum.
 
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