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Hello fellow riders!

Have been riding my new ninja 250 for 2 weeks now and im loving it! Seems that every time I ride it, I learn something new :)

Its truly a small, light, and not-so-powerful bike. I chose a small engine to start out safe, and learn the most I could without worrying about scratching an older bike (2000 model). When will I be ready for a new one? I've been considering 600 sport bikes, and have set a minimum of 2 months on my current bike before upgrading.

Thoughts?

Thanks in advance :)
 

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Hello fellow riders!

Have been riding my new ninja 250 for 2 weeks now and im loving it! Seems that every time I ride it, I learn something new :)

Its truly a small, light, and not-so-powerful bike. I chose a small engine to start out safe, and learn the most I could without worrying about scratching an older bike (2000 model). When will I be ready for a new one? I've been considering 600 sport bikes, and have set a minimum of 2 months on my current bike before upgrading.

Thoughts?

Thanks in advance :)
Bad idea.....2 months isnt even close to enough time to learn the skills necessary to safely and competently ride a 600cc super sport.

Id say minimum 1 year.....but more important then time is miles. Id say if you put in 15K safe miles.....then Id look at upgrading.

The thing is a good rider on a 250 will be able to out ride a bad rider on a 600.

Focus on being a good rider and not on what your riding.
 

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I have had my Ninja 250 for two years. It is a great bike and I would keep it longer, but I will be giving it to my son soon as he learns to ride. Instead of two months, I would think two seasons would be a better time frame.
 

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I'm really not sure why so many ask this question...
Most people advise the slow and steady approach.
I advise that ONLY YOU KNOW YOURSELF.
If you are patient, skilled and and willing learner, there is no reason why you cannot make the jump to the bigger bike.
There are a lot of bad riders out there -- and I'm certain new riders make up a large portion of that. But there are boatload of bad riders who have been riding a long time.
The amount of time on the bike, 600 sport bike or any other, doesn't mean squat if you are an impatient, crappy rider.
Just my 2 cents.
 

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The "only you know yourself" logic is useless, because very rarely does ANYONE REALLY know themselves. Overconfidence has killed many people.

A 250cc Ninja to 600cc supersport is a HUGE leap, one that I don't think anyone needs to make. Unless you can push your Ninja 250 to its very limits, you should take incremental steps. When you are done with the Ninja, in at LEAST 6 months, try bumping up to something like a Ninja 500, Ninja 650, SV650, etc? Even a Bandit 600 would be a heck of a lot better than hopping onto a 600cc supersport (which makes more power than my Bandit 1200S).
 

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The "only you know yourself" logic is useless, because very rarely does ANYONE REALLY know themselves. Overconfidence has killed many people.\.
That is SUCH BS.

No kidding that overconfidence has killed people. Geez, I never would have guessed that based upon how so many sportsbike riders like to pass on blind curves.

If you were overconfident, I'm really sorry for you, BUT it does not mean the other person is.

I have no problem with advising someone of the relative differences in power of one bike over another or the nuances of handling. But I do not agree with the mantra that supposedly applies to everyone that everyone must take baby steps. Guess what... some people are pretty dang responsible. So tell them that one bike is more powerful and HOW, but don't tell them what they are or are not capable of handling.

There are as many different ways of riding a motorcycle as there are motorcycle riders. Having never walked in someone else's shoes, I'm not about to tell them what they can or cannot do.

Getting down from soapbox.
 

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I'm curious why there never seems to be any variation in this question. Brand new rider on Ninja 250 wanting to upgrade (?) to 600 sports bike. Never a 500, 650, 750, 883, or 1200 twin. Always a 600 sports bike. Do they teach this in the schools or something?
 

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Hello fellow riders!

Have been riding my new ninja 250 for 2 weeks now and im loving it! Seems that every time I ride it, I learn something new :)

Its truly a small, light, and not-so-powerful bike. I chose a small engine to start out safe, and learn the most I could without worrying about scratching an older bike (2000 model). When will I be ready for a new one? I've been considering 600 sport bikes, and have set a minimum of 2 months on my current bike before upgrading.

Thoughts?

Thanks in advance :)
I guess I want to add to my previous statement....a little variation if you will.

OP....you state that every time you ride you learn something new. Thats a good thing.....never stop learning. I still learn things.....5+ and 125K miles later.

The problem with a powerful 600cc super sport is that the learning curve is steep. The same little bobble on your 250 that "teaches you a lesson" may very well be the thing that kills you on a 600.......or gives you lots of thinking time while your in the hospital.

Take time to develop your skills on the bike you have.....dont rush it.
 

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That is SUCH BS.

No kidding that overconfidence has killed people. Geez, I never would have guessed that based upon how so many sportsbike riders like to pass on blind curves.

If you were overconfident, I'm really sorry for you, BUT it does not mean the other person is.

I have no problem with advising someone of the relative differences in power of one bike over another or the nuances of handling. But I do not agree with the mantra that supposedly applies to everyone that everyone must take baby steps. Guess what... some people are pretty dang responsible. So tell them that one bike is more powerful and HOW, but don't tell them what they are or are not capable of handling.

There are as many different ways of riding a motorcycle as there are motorcycle riders. Having never walked in someone else's shoes, I'm not about to tell them what they can or cannot do.

Getting down from soapbox.
The responsibility lies with the rider, this is true, but to encourage by using the "know yourself" line is irresponsible. You nor I nor anyone else here know this rider. In my opinion advising the safest route is a duty. How would you feel if this rider made the jump based on your advice and you find out he died on his super-sport two weeks later? Yes it is true that some people start on a bike which is actually to much for them and become good riders. But the majority of those riders either get seriously injured, give up because they scared themselves, or worse die. I will continue to advise against new riders making the jump to a SS just as I will always advise all riders to wear gear.
 

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That is SUCH BS.

No kidding that overconfidence has killed people. Geez, I never would have guessed that based upon how so many sportsbike riders like to pass on blind curves.

If you were overconfident, I'm really sorry for you, BUT it does not mean the other person is.

I have no problem with advising someone of the relative differences in power of one bike over another or the nuances of handling. But I do not agree with the mantra that supposedly applies to everyone that everyone must take baby steps. Guess what... some people are pretty dang responsible. So tell them that one bike is more powerful and HOW, but don't tell them what they are or are not capable of handling.

There are as many different ways of riding a motorcycle as there are motorcycle riders. Having never walked in someone else's shoes, I'm not about to tell them what they can or cannot do.

Getting down from soapbox.
Tell me this. How can a new, inexperienced rider critically evaluate their own skill? That ability comes from experience. Without experience you have no perspective from which to evaluate.

You can be a damn responsible rider, but a split second of overconfidence or bad judgement is all it takes, and the risk is compounded when you lack experience.
 

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Tell me this. How can a new, inexperienced rider critically evaluate their own skill? That ability comes from experience. Without experience you have no perspective from which to evaluate.

You can be a damn responsible rider, but a split second of overconfidence or bad judgement is all it takes, and the risk is compounded when you lack experience.
I agree, if you have to ask when you are ready then you are not ready. Last thing you want is to take a curve too fast, cross the line and something bad happen. It can also happen really really quickly.

 

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Missing the point.

Telling someone they need "two months" or "two years" is not productive. If you have the information about the differences in the bike, provide that information. Let the individual make a decision based upon their own knowledge of their abilities.

I do not care how much time anyone has riding a bike, driving a car, climbing ladders, walking dogs, or anything else.
A "split second of overconfidence or bad judgement is all it takes" applies everywhere. Don't you think the person making the inquiry about the bikes is aware of that?
 

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OP I think you are asking a really difficult question because there's no absolute time table per se (IMHO).

Everyone is different and everyone learns at a different rate.

Also, everyone is different and everyone approaches riding in a different manner (ie: some people like to take risks and some others are paranoid extra-careful freaks).

I dread to bring myself as an example here because the few people that know me on the board, know how sickengly fast I went through three bikes in the span of 6 months.

I started with a Ninja 250 just like you. I made the bad mistake of replacing it with a Versys 650 (NOT A 600!!!!!) after only 3 weeks. My reasons were valid but the bike was not. I made the mistake of buying a bike without test riding it ... or maybe I would have bought it nonetheless and found out the hard way that it wasn't for me.

After a few months of riding I stumbled in a great deal and landed on a Speed Triple.

That's a liter bike and it's got a massive amount of power.

However, I need to tell you about me, so we can put this into context:

I'm 40 years old. I'm an ex pilot. I'm extremely paranoid about screwing up (meaning: I'm a perfectionist by nature in everything I do). I literally printed out a checklist (similar to a pre-flight checklist I used for my aircraft back in the day) that I use to check everything in the bike and for my gear, prior to firing up the engine.

I go through the checklist every time I'm about to start the bike.

I have a different checklist for warm days, winter days, bad weather days.

I changed my checklist(s) when I changed bikes.

I studied the manual from the first page to the last and memorized all control panel settings that are pertinent and important while away from home.

I drive religiously at the speed limit, unless I have unlimited visiblity, no traffic, on the highway, in which case I allow myself to "punch it" and hit 80+ mph.

If the speed limit on the ramp says "20 mph" you will see me riding at 19 mph. I am not kidding.

To me riding is an exercise in perfection. Taking a turn fast is not the point. Taking the turn at exactly the right entry point and hitting the exact apex point is ... well, the point (pun).

Also as every decent pilot out there I religiously believe in recurrent training.

I will go back in spring to take the BRC with my bike this time (BRC-2 I think they call it).

Plus I will go to Poughkeepsie, NY to take the "total control" class.

Am I safe with a 135 hp bike? Yeah ... I think I am. Not because I'm an "ace" but because I have faith in my sense of self preservation.

Bad things can happen to anyone ... so if a truck pulls out of a blind alley at night, with its lights off at the same time a deer is crossing in front of me and I die because I get hit by the deer and run over by the truck even if I was doing 20 mph ... well, I guess my number was up (knock on wood ... I hope it isn't).

But I guess that my mantra is "I love riding ... I don't like dying" ... so if you ever were to ride with me, you'd get bored after half a mile, while I'd enjoy every second of my grandma-paced ride.

I am not saying that you need to be like me to be safe but in my experience a powerful and fast machine (be that a bike or a plane) can put you way over your head, way quickly. Unless you have the mental preparation and good muscle memory (that can only be developed over time and/or through training) to face emergencies or the unexpected, you might find one day that you go grab a fistful of brake in your supersport and find yourself flipped over, heading face first, into the SUV that just pulled into your lane ... good night and good luck. And all of that because you got startled and you didn't practice emergency braking and slow speed maneuvers with your supersport for 4 hours a weekend for a whole month the way I am doing with the Speed Triple I just got (again, because I'm paranoid).

A 600 can be a lot of bike, with a lot of brake power and engine power and unless you are ready for it, it can betray you and it might not forgive you if you make a mistake.

That's the whole point.

Sorry for the very long rant/post ... as you can see I gave a lot of thought to the subject.

unless you are ready for it ... and you may or may not be the best judge of that ...

:)

PS: I MISS MY Ninjette!!! When people tell you to keep the Ninjette and have fun with it for a year, they are not kidding. If I could go back I'd probably keep the ninjette for a whole year. the Ninjettes are so much fun, so easy, so "sprinty" so low-key and low maintenance ... I regret selling it and in fact I am entertaining buying one just to keep it around for some weekend fun around town ... as a second bike. But I fell for the lure of more power and larger bikes ... oh well. :)
 

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A "split second of overconfidence or bad judgement is all it takes" applies everywhere. Don't you think the person making the inquiry about the bikes is aware of that?

It has been my experience, that for young men under the age of 25, NO.

It has also been my experience that only young men under the age of 25 ask if 2 weeks is long enough to upgrade to a supersport.
 

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... the Ninjettes are so much fun, so easy, so "sprinty" so low-key and low maintenance ... I regret selling it and in fact I am entertaining buying one just to keep it around for some weekend fun around town ... as a second bike. But I fell for the lure of more power and larger bikes ... oh well. :)
I'm contemplating buying myself a Ninja 250 for the same reasons. I've been riding since 1969, getting ever bigger and heavier bikes, but still enjoy small bikes. :D
 

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A "split second of overconfidence or bad judgement is all it takes" applies everywhere. Don't you think the person making the inquiry about the bikes is aware of that?
And you obviously didn't actually read my post, because I said that lack of experience COMPOUNDS the risk. Not once did I say that that risk is absent from experienced riders.
 
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