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So I lost the key to my vstar 650. I've been looking around and seems the best option for me is a lock smith. I've had 2 shops tell me different things though. I was able to get the helmet lock off, and one shop told me to bring it in and they would make a key. The other shop told me that a key made off the helmet lock wouldn't have as many cuts, and wouldn't work for the ignition. does anyone know which if i will be able to get a working key off the helmet lock?
 

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I believe shop #2 is correct.

Do you happen to have the key code someplace? It would have been attached to the two orginal keys when new. With the code, a dealer should be able to cut a new key.
 

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Yes, the code.

For every new bike or car, please save the keycodes (and radio codes) in some place so you can have them handy.

Dennis
 

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Helmet lock or gas cap will have 5 out of 7 cuts, they would need access to the ignition lock to get the last two. Uses the X248 ILCO keyblank aka YM63. Generally, Yamaha's don't have codes. This is a 20-30 minute job for a good locky. I would charge $75 for onsite replacement, $5 for each additional copy. Good luck.
 

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Helmet lock or gas cap will have 5 out of 7 cuts, they would need access to the ignition lock to get the last two. Uses the X248 ILCO keyblank aka YM63. Generally, Yamaha's don't have codes. This is a 20-30 minute job for a good locky. I would charge $75 for onsite replacement, $5 for each additional copy. Good luck.
Good info, why do they not have the other cuts just out of curiosity?
 

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Well, most MC's used 5 cuts in the key back in the 1970s and 1980's, theft was less of a problem then. Bikes got nicer and more expensive, and soon the 5 cut key wasn't enough security. But gas caps in particular, can't accept a longer key (or the cap is too deep and won't open or close because its too long). So the answer is just use cuts 3-7 (5 cuts total) for the gas cap, the key stops when the tip hits the back of the lock. Sometimes you can even see cuts one or one and two sticking out while you open your gas cap. Once a locky gets 3-7 by taking the gas cap lock or helmet lock apart, special software will narrow the key down to a few possibilities for the final 2 cuts and then we "progress" the cuts.

Also, helmet locks would stick out quite a bit on a 7 cut or 8 cut key if all cuts were used.
 

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I also suspect the manufacturers figured:

1. They already had 5 cut helmet, gas cap and seat locks manufactured, so only the ignition would need to be redesigned to accept 7 or 8 cuts.

2. They may have also considered lost keys. By giving locksmiths (who would need to pick the lock first, to take it apart and make a key) an easier to pick 5 cut lock, it makes key origination much easier, but still requiring some locksmithing skill.
 

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care to elaborate

OK. I worked for a locksmith. He said that the people that did not pay him were guilty of theft, because it was theft services. However he did not have to pay others because he did not sign any papers saying that he would pay for any services that they provided to him. Promises that he made were not actually services because there was not anything written down. he did not give a quote, because that would tie him to a price. He would say that the work was possible this much money, but might be more. That is how a $200.00 job could turn into a $1200.00 job. He often threaten people that he would sue them if the work was not paid in full when services were rendered. He also claim to be a policeman and could arrest them on the spot for theft.

Not a very nice person, but claimed to be a true Christian and a follower of the doctrine.

I found this out by watching him and how he treated me.

Bud16
 

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OK. I worked for a locksmith. He said that the people that did not pay him were guilty of theft, because it was theft services. However he did not have to pay others because he did not sign any papers saying that he would pay for any services that they provided to him. Promises that he made were not actually services because there was not anything written down. he did not give a quote, because that would tie him to a price. He would say that the work was possible this much money, but might be more. That is how a $200.00 job could turn into a $1200.00 job. He often threaten people that he would sue them if the work was not paid in full when services were rendered. He also claim to be a policeman and could arrest them on the spot for theft.

Not a very nice person, but claimed to be a true Christian and a follower of the doctrine.

I found this out by watching him and how he treated me.

Bud16
Agreed. Take the Ignition switch out and go to the locksmiths with it. Ask them the price up front for it. The one I went to charged me 35 for an original (it doesn't fit my helmet lock, but he said he'd do one for that for $5 on friday when he gets more keys in).
 

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So I lost the key to my vstar 650. I've been looking around and seems the best option for me is a lock smith. I've had 2 shops tell me different things though. I was able to get the helmet lock off, and one shop told me to bring it in and they would make a key. The other shop told me that a key made off the helmet lock wouldn't have as many cuts, and wouldn't work for the ignition. does anyone know which if i will be able to get a working key off the helmet lock?
All depends. when I worked in a bike shop frequently the helmet lock had the key number on it too. I'd have shop one cut a key guaranteeing it will work on the bike.

Regardless, if there is a number on the lock it is very likely the proper key number for the ignition too. But you could pull the ignition and see what number is there if you want.

I actually have cut a couple hundred keys for bikes when I worked in the shop. We had the Curtis key cutter and blanks. All it took for Honda and I think Yamaha was the key code number. Kawasaki didn't supply cut codes to Curtis back then.
 
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