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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, as a new rider I was wondering if there’s such thing as “this is a sign you shouldn’t be riding”. Recently while practicing I ended up falling, let me explain the series of unfortunate events haha: this was with a friend rider
I started well, took off and was riding around my neighborhood, it’s literally a nice loop 🔁.. however I kept going right instead of switching directions to start going left. We reached a stop sign and saw my friend go right, I felt intimidated because I’m not use to going right yet. I realized most of my practices have me turning right. Anyways, she noticed I wasn’t going, at this point I felt a little nervous because I felt I couldn’t make that right turn, I decided to go straight however instead of continuing to go straight to make a u turn I slowed down and stoped at a small little dip and was trying to push my bike thru it to make that u turn. I did it however once I was trying to take off I kept stalling and stalling, like about 3-4 times and I’m sure this happened because I was already super nervous of the whole situation. Obviously that got me even more nervous and instead of just taking a break and a breather I kept trying because I felt pressured that my friend was waiting on me. So during my trying of taking off my bike jerked really hard and I believe I let the clutch go and ended revving and the bike too off and of course threw me off. No severe injuries but I felt so dumb. My friend apologized for decided to go right when I wasn’t ready but it made me doubt myself. Is this normal? Positive side is I’m looking forward to practicing again, am I trying to hard to ride? How do you know if this is or is not for you? Obviously I don’t want to break anything or crash on the road. Thanks for your honest opinions in advance.
 

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It will come in time. You gotta let go and roll with it. Remember to look where you wanna go and dont stare at the ground right in front of you. Where you look s where your going.

A story to go with this. A couple of years ago, on the way to work, in my truck, a deer ran out and I got him. It bent the bumper in and if I turned left, it rubbed the tire so I had to make my path to work longer by turning only to the right. So it actully is possible in some cases to get somewhere turning only in one direction. Luckily I had tools with me to remove the bumper and make it home.
 

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It takes a lot of practice, don't worry. When I first rode a bike I used to press the clutch in during the turns because I was afraid to use the throttle when turning. Now I can turn without my hands ( I don't do it but I can lol ).
As they said, you must find an open area or a quiet road and train there. It's better to ride alone when trying to learn how to ride—trying to follow someone is not a good idea.
 

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yes, more training in safe controlled environment where you can focus on specific things without getting overwhelmed with too much data from traffic, signal-lights, etc.. Big lots are great!

1. take-off without stalling - Doing both clutch lever release and increasing throttle simultaneously can be difficult. Instead, separate the motions. Increase throttle to 3500rpms first, hold it there and ignore. Then proceed to release clutch to take off.

2. right-turns - can be more difficult because you have to push on right bar, yet not change throttle rotation. Many beginners get locked-arm syndrome where they just can't push on that bar. That's ok, just practice in lots until you get used to pushing on right bar assertively without changing throttle rotation.
 

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It takes time, those aren't signs to stop riding. You don't just get up and run with out falling and walking first. Take your time, find a parking lot and just do circles, starting and stopping till your used to it the weight of the bike and friction points of the clutch-gas etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It will come in time. You gotta let go and roll with it. Remember to look where you wanna go and dont stare at the ground right in front of you. Where you look s where your going.

A story to go with this. A couple of years ago, on the way to work, in my truck, a deer ran out and I got him. It bent the bumper in and if I turned left, it rubbed the tire so I had to make my path to work longer by turning only to the right. So it actully is possible in some cases to get somewhere turning only in one direction. Luckily I had tools with me to remove the bumper and make it home.
Oh wow, thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It takes a lot of practice, don't worry. When I first rode a bike I used to press the clutch in during the turns because I was afraid to use the throttle when turning. Now I can turn without my hands ( I don't do it but I can lol ).
As they said, you must find an open area or a quiet road and train there. It's better to ride alone when trying to learn how to ride—trying to follow someone is not a good idea.
Thanks, yes, I realized I need to learn solo haha .. too much pressure following someone right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would also recommend taking a riding course. It will teach you about bikes and the skills involved with riding them. Beyond that it will teach you road safety. That is worth it - trust me - it saved my life two weeks after the course.
Thanks I did take one however it took a while to find a bike and get it lowered so I lost some time. I’m trying to take it slow and not rush, the bike feels a lot more different than the one I took the class in, so I’m working on feeling comfortable with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
yes, more training in safe controlled environment where you can focus on specific things without getting overwhelmed with too much data from traffic, signal-lights, etc.. Big lots are great!

1. take-off without stalling - Doing both clutch lever release and increasing throttle simultaneously can be difficult. Instead, separate the motions. Increase throttle to 3500rpms first, hold it there and ignore. Then proceed to release clutch to take off.

2. right-turns - can be more difficult because you have to push on right bar, yet not change throttle rotation. Many beginners get locked-arm syndrome where they just can't push on that bar. That's ok, just practice in lots until you get used to pushing on right bar assertively without changing throttle rotation.
Hmm okay got it thank you, will keep it in mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It takes time, those aren't signs to stop riding. You don't just get up and run with out falling and walking first. Take your time, find a parking lot and just do circles, starting and stopping till your used to it the weight of the bike and friction points of the clutch-gas etc.
Aha! That’s exactly what I think I need! Thank you!!
 

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It would be easy to say relax, but I know its easier said than done. You're not experiencing something most all of us haven't experienced at one time or another. (May have been so long ago some of us may have forgot it.) But the sad truth is, you're normal. (Like we all used to be.) You're getting some good advice but with time, practice and experience it'll all come together for you. Might even be able to relax a little bit while riding some day.
 

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I got my first bike when I was in my early 20s. Didn't know enough to be scared and grew up on a farm with all sorts of equipment and what not so the clutch/throttle/brake/shift thing didn't phase me. Second bike I was 25 and working as an EMT. Saw a lot of stuff I wish I could forget, and sold my bike. (I'll spare you the graphic motorcycle related scene that contributed to that decision.) That was 30 years or more ago.

This spring I decided I wanted a bike again and went to look at one I saw for sale on fb. I got out of the truck, walked over to look at the bike, and actually had a mild panic attack! I was quite surprised at how big and scary the motorcycle seemed to be and I just sort of froze. The seller sort of smirked at me and came over, started the bike and said go ahead, test drive it. He clapped his helmet on my head and buckled it up for me as though I was a child so then of course I had to try. I wobbled my way through the yard and out to the street, and managed to make the turn without falling over, duck-walking like you see on the you tube videos. I was shaking so hard and couldn't seem to breathe. I puttered a few blocks through town (thankfully a very small, flat town on a weekday) wandering across the centerline of the street while I tried to look down and find the gearshift. It was awful! I shuddered to a stop at the first stop sign and nearly fell over. I think all that saved me is the bike is low and I can easily flat-foot on both sides.

I sat there thinking about it for a bit, but my give a damn is completely busted and life isn't what is was, and my main thought was I've got nothing left to lose. I let out the clutch, gave it some throttle and wobbled my way back to the guy's house and told him I'd take it. He pocketed the money and then drive the bike to my house for me.

That was in April. Now, six months later, Bike and are good friends and go on adventures together.

I'm boring you with the whole story so you know even someone who used to ride a lot can be scared and unskilled.

It took me quite a while to get comfortable on Bike and get over the racing heart/shaking hands/short of breath stuff. I had to practice in a parking lot for days before I felt like I could go out on the road. It took even longer to start getting smooth with the stops and take offs and I still have to think about it some, it's not fully instinctive yet. Just last week I had an embarrassing bobble when I put my foot down but was still moving too quickly and had to do some funky dance moves to stay upright and stop properly. Of course there was a car behind me to witness my fat old white woman rap.

So don't get discouraged. It takes time, it takes practice, and it takes getting used to your bike so that you've built up the muscle memory. You'll get to the point where your hands and feet automatically get in the right position to work the controls at the right time and you won't have to think about it so hard. Try to relax and enjoy. Invest your time in practice and there's some channels that have great tips for road strategy that can help, like MCRider with Kevin.

You'll know if you shouldn't ride - you'll have that gut sick feeling and dread trying and be worn out and unhappy after every ride. You'll find yourself avoiding riding even when the weather and the road are calling. If that happens, then give it up.
But if you're interested and trying and enjoying it; thinking about riding and reading about riding and waiting impatiently for the rain to quit so you can ride again, you're good, even if you're awkward yet. Give it time, practice, relax, and enjoy! Best of luck to you.
 

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Been given some great advise here .. Will just add try some Figure 8's on an isolated parking lot and when your handlebars are cocked do not use the front brake .. When comfortable doing that practice some emergency braking.. Just start slow and keep practicing and will gain confidence in your ability ..
 

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You will get there with patience and practice. As others have mentioned, a riding class would likely be a very good thing since they teach all of these basic skills and techniques. And then yes, practice practice practice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I got my first bike when I was in my early 20s. Didn't know enough to be scared and grew up on a farm with all sorts of equipment and what not so the clutch/throttle/brake/shift thing didn't phase me. Second bike I was 25 and working as an EMT. Saw a lot of stuff I wish I could forget, and sold my bike. (I'll spare you the graphic motorcycle related scene that contributed to that decision.) That was 30 years or more ago.

This spring I decided I wanted a bike again and went to look at one I saw for sale on fb. I got out of the truck, walked over to look at the bike, and actually had a mild panic attack! I was quite surprised at how big and scary the motorcycle seemed to be and I just sort of froze. The seller sort of smirked at me and came over, started the bike and said go ahead, test drive it. He clapped his helmet on my head and buckled it up for me as though I was a child so then of course I had to try. I wobbled my way through the yard and out to the street, and managed to make the turn without falling over, duck-walking like you see on the you tube videos. I was shaking so hard and couldn't seem to breathe. I puttered a few blocks through town (thankfully a very small, flat town on a weekday) wandering across the centerline of the street while I tried to look down and find the gearshift. It was awful! I shuddered to a stop at the first stop sign and nearly fell over. I think all that saved me is the bike is low and I can easily flat-foot on both sides.

I sat there thinking about it for a bit, but my give a damn is completely busted and life isn't what is was, and my main thought was I've got nothing left to lose. I let out the clutch, gave it some throttle and wobbled my way back to the guy's house and told him I'd take it. He pocketed the money and then drive the bike to my house for me.

That was in April. Now, six months later, Bike and are good friends and go on adventures together.

I'm boring you with the whole story so you know even someone who used to ride a lot can be scared and unskilled.

It took me quite a while to get comfortable on Bike and get over the racing heart/shaking hands/short of breath stuff. I had to practice in a parking lot for days before I felt like I could go out on the road. It took even longer to start getting smooth with the stops and take offs and I still have to think about it some, it's not fully instinctive yet. Just last week I had an embarrassing bobble when I put my foot down but was still moving too quickly and had to do some funky dance moves to stay upright and stop properly. Of course there was a car behind me to witness my fat old white woman rap.

So don't get discouraged. It takes time, it takes practice, and it takes getting used to your bike so that you've built up the muscle memory. You'll get to the point where your hands and feet automatically get in the right position to work the controls at the right time and you won't have to think about it so hard. Try to relax and enjoy. Invest your time in practice and there's some channels that have great tips for road strategy that can help, like MCRider with Kevin.

You'll know if you shouldn't ride - you'll have that gut sick feeling and dread trying and be worn out and unhappy after every ride. You'll find yourself avoiding riding even when the weather and the road are calling. If that happens, then give it up.
But if you're interested and trying and enjoying it; thinking about riding and reading about riding and waiting impatiently for the rain to quit so you can ride again, you're good, even if you're awkward yet. Give it time, practice, relax, and enjoy! Best of luck to you.
Wow! Thank you so much for sharing, that is an awesome story. Thank you for te encouragement, It definitely helps reading this. I do get nervous about getting back on it but once I start watching all these random videos of people riding and girl riders I get pumped up haha… and definitely want to get on it again.
 
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