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Dude.. let me tell you about the time i drove my friends Zx10r. First time riding a rocket. I have a good knowledge of stick shift. popped the clutch and bam! ... i was not ready for the weight of the bike and it hit the ground. Another thing is. slow speeds suck when u first start out. Don't be stupid. A 600cc bike is plenty for me. :) If you're going to get a bike get a gsxr 600 or r6 if u have to have that power. .
 

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Take my new (not first bike) 08 R6 for example. Still breaking it in at about 760 miles on it right now. Although I know what 16000 RPM's feels like, consider this. Right now I can only go as far as 8500 RPM's as to have it properly broken in. And even as an experienced rider 8500 RPM's pulls much harder than my 400 H.P. 77 vette. Think about it. A litre bike is not a wise choice for ANY first time street rider (assuming) its a sportbike. If your thinking cruiser I say it doesnt matter as long as your strong enough to pick up 600lbs + off its side, lol.
 

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Sorry TFee3, this wouldn't happen on a 250, 500 or 650:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WV2rvJWLlro

(newb wrecks a bike despite being under instruction by the bike's owner)
OMG. The guy freaked out and grabbed the handlebar. This happened to me on my cousin´s puny little 150cc dirtbike because with a twist throttle, the natural reaction to hold on for extra security can cause you to throttle up the bike accidently.

It really is a problem with new riders and it really does take some time to get used to, NO MATTER WHO YOU ARE. You should expect to accidently spike the throttle like this at least a few times when you are learning to ride. IT´S JUST ABOUT UNAVOIDABLE.

The lesson here is that if you do it on a starter bike it´s not such a big deal! I didn´t dump my cousin´s bike because it didn´t have the torque or acceleration to throw me off like the supersport in the video.

On a Ninja 250R, you´d be fine. You can protect yourself from a stupid accident like this by thinking before you grab the handlebar. Lean forward and prepare to catch the bike just in case you accidently spike the throttle.

Good luck!
 

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i think everyone will tell you! don't get a liter bike! If u really want to get something fast do a 600. . that will prolly scare u enough and be just enough power for u. lol
 

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Everyone keeps talking about spiking the throttle or accidentally turning it when applying the front brake. I've ridden for years and hit bumps that almost threw me off the bike, but never once spiked the throttle as you say. Maybe I'm lucky. But, I do have one technique that prevents that. My bike has a solid chrome end that doesn't twist. When things get bumpy, I slide my hand down so half of it is on the chrome piece, and the other half is on the throttle. It stabilizes my hand. When I had bikes with no solid end on the handle bar, I put my thumb and forefinger over the bar in front of the throttle, and it did the same thing.
 

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Or I've found you can lower your wrist, so the only way to possibly turn the throttle is away from you (throttle off). Also covering the clutch can be a life-saver, if that guy had covered the clutch it would've jumped then stopped.
 

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Everyone keeps talking about spiking the throttle or accidentally turning it when applying the front brake. I've ridden for years and hit bumps that almost threw me off the bike, but never once spiked the throttle as you say. Maybe I'm lucky. But, I do have one technique that prevents that. My bike has a solid chrome end that doesn't twist. When things get bumpy, I slide my hand down so half of it is on the chrome piece, and the other half is on the throttle. It stabilizes my hand. When I had bikes with no solid end on the handle bar, I put my thumb and forefinger over the bar in front of the throttle, and it did the same thing.
The problems arise when a total newb that has no idea what to expect underestimates the bike's power. They twist the throttle too much when they take off and freak out when the front tire comes off of the ground. They get into a situation where they think they have to stop fast and give it too much brake at 20 or 30 mph. They're going around a corner and either hit the brakes to slow down at a bad time or they blip the throttle at the wrong time and the bike goes out from under them. They're at a light and are paying attention to something else and then freak out when they realize that it turned green when they weren't looking (I had to throw that one in there ;)).

Some people are level headed and coordinated enough to jump on a sport bike and never have a problem. My first time on a 600cc I had no idea what to expect so I just played it safe and took it really slow. By the time I got around the first corner I realized that a lot of my concerns were hype and I started pushing it a little. After about a mile I had a feel for it and was confident and comfortable. Now I want one :eek:.

Sure you can kill yourself on a 50cc but the responsiveness and power of a sport bike are so much greater than other bikes on the street that it's really easy to make a mistake and end up kissing asphalt if you're not already good at riding when you get on one. Even after you do get a feel for it and you start to know what to expect those bikes are made for speed and pushing limits. It's easy to find yourself pushing those limits which will get you in big trouble if you push it too far. A newb is a lot more likely to push it too far because he's not quite sure of his or the bike's limits in the first place even if he thinks he is.
 

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my first ride outside the MSF course was a yamaha r6. a friend decided (i think, and i hope he's right) that i was level headed enough he could let me borrow it without too much damage. i've been riding it a week, and i just bought a 225cc dual sport.

the dual sport has enough power for me, but i like the responsiveness of the supersport. i feel like the extra power is more easily handled when the controls are as tight as they are on a supersport. there's no way i'd want the controls of my xt 225 combined with the power of the r6.

i have also ridden a gsxr1000 a little. that thing has some serious get up and go, but the weight and power scare me. again, i really like the responsiveness of it, but if i hadn't had even the little bit of experience on the r6 to get the feel of a supersport, it would have scared the crap out of me.

if you get the supersport, take it slow at first
 

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Take the MSF course. Don't buy a supersport! Get something in between; a Suzuki SV650, Kawasaki Ninja 650R, or even a Yamaha FZ6! They have plenty of power and the sport look. I LOVE my Ninja 650, and its WAY more comfortable than the low clip ons you find on most supersports... In the end, its all about you, and what you really want. Your money and your body.
 

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Good advice. The truth is there are plenty of great bikes out there for those who want more than a starter bike can give them. The FZ6, the Triumph Street Triple, etc. are all more than fast enough to keep you entertained.
 

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Welp, I finally picked up the bike and took it for a spin! Now remember, I have NEVER ridden a street bike. A few hours altogether with a dirt bike once and that's about it.

I did great!! I was concerned it was too big a bike (Bandit 1250S), but nope! It was awesome!!! The perfect bike for me!! It's everything I hoped it would be and everything I thought would be good about it! If you want a liter+ for your first bike, make sure it's one with good low end!

Now granted I think I pick things up quicker than the average person and I had some other skills that definitely contributed (skilled road bicycling, etc.), but if you pick things up like this pretty well, GO FOR IT and just take it slow!


YEEESSS!! I are the hooked!!! :D :D
 

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Welp, I finally picked up the bike and took it for a spin! Now remember, I have NEVER ridden a street bike. A few hours altogether with a dirt bike once and that's about it.

I did great!! I was concerned it was too big a bike (Bandit 1250S), but nope! It was awesome!!! The perfect bike for me!! It's everything I hoped it would be and everything I thought would be good about it! If you want a liter+ for your first bike, make sure it's one with good low end!

Now granted I think I pick things up quicker than the average person and I had some other skills that definitely contributed (skilled road bicycling, etc.), but if you pick things up like this pretty well, GO FOR IT and just take it slow!


YEEESSS!! I are the hooked!!! :D :D

That's funny that your title is "I learned on a litre". I'd say one really never stops learning and you've only had the bike for one day. All the same, good luck with it and be safe.
 

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Welp, I finally picked up the bike and took it for a spin! Now remember, I have NEVER ridden a street bike. A few hours altogether with a dirt bike once and that's about it.

I did great!! I was concerned it was too big a bike (Bandit 1250S), but nope! It was awesome!!! The perfect bike for me!! It's everything I hoped it would be and everything I thought would be good about it! If you want a liter+ for your first bike, make sure it's one with good low end!

Now granted I think I pick things up quicker than the average person and I had some other skills that definitely contributed (skilled road bicycling, etc.), but if you pick things up like this pretty well, GO FOR IT and just take it slow!


YEEESSS!! I are the hooked!!! :D :D
Congratulations man! I think you´ve made a wise choice in going for the Bandit rather than a pure sportbike. Not only will it be easier to learn on and slightly less dangerous than a GSX-R1000 (for example), it will also be more comfortable and more usable on the street due to the smoother power band.
 

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Get the one you want and understand what you are getting yourself into. Any bike can kill, it's the rider who has to control the machine, his environment, and himself.
 
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