Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 73 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been looking around the internet, and I've seen lots of people who say that if you're getting your first bike, don't get a literbike (specifically a Honda CBR1000RR).

Now, I'm wondering, is it really that bad to get one if you just don't ride like a maniac? It's not like just because you have a fast bike, you HAVE to go fast.
 
F

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
that bike will do 0-60 mph in 3.1 seconds

So ya, the slightest slip will get you going bloody fast, I'm a little tired so I'll let someone else here give the full explanation on why it would be a bad idea.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,070 Posts
The trick here is: at 10,000 rpm ANY liter bike is making 130 hp. And if you're at 5000rpm and you screw up and pin it?

You're on your butt. Likewise in first gear after about 8 seconds you're goin' 100mph and need to shift to second.

AND how well can you get that baby hauled down from speed? As a rookie?

You're better off on something that doesn't have the potential to go from 0 to stupid in 3.0 seconds.

Getting a literbike for your first bike doesn't mean you're gonna die. BUT you'll probably have to buy plastics AND the odds of personal physical disaster go up dramatically.

If it's truly your first bike you'll toddle around on it, thinking wow this is fast--UNTIL you really turn the throttle, flatten your eyeballs and life and danger start coming at you faster than you ever thought possible.

I would suggest something smaller. Personally? I love dual sports for first bikes because you can drop them and they're cheap to fix, and easy to pick up.
 
F

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
The trick here is: at 10,000 rpm ANY liter bike is making 130 hp. And if you're at 5000rpm and you screw up and pin it?

You're on your butt. Likewise in first gear after about 8 seconds you're goin' 100mph and need to shift to second.

AND how well can you get that baby hauled down from speed? As a rookie?

You're better off on something that doesn't have the potential to go from 0 to stupid in 3.0 seconds.

Getting a literbike for your first bike doesn't mean you're gonna die. BUT you'll probably have to buy plastics AND the odds of personal physical disaster go up dramatically.

If it's truly your first bike you'll toddle around on it, thinking wow this is fast--UNTIL you really turn the throttle, flatten your eyeballs and life and danger start coming at you faster than you ever thought possible.

I would suggest something smaller. Personally? I love dual sports for first bikes because you can drop them and they're cheap to fix, and easy to pick up.
Indeed, the GS 500E is good to for the above reasons (doesn't really get damaged when you drop it and easy to pick up)
 
F

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Would you say a 600cc be pushing it?
normally yes, unless it's from 10 years ago or more.

the newer 600's still run in an area of 100 hp or more where a beginner bike should be around 50, 75 would be the highest I would recommend for a new person (and that's if they were an incredibly careful and responsible driver)

the SV 650 would be a good bike to look at (74. something horsepower)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,070 Posts
Personally, and I never said this if anyone asks, a GSXR600 with the 'traction control' (or whatever they call the adjustable mapping) set in the 'weak sauce' position might be tolerable. I like the new GSX-F if you're dead set for a sporty looking starter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
So how about other bikes, like Harleys, which aren't generally meant to go extremely fast, but they are well over the 1000cc mark? Is there something different about them?
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Yeah, I'm saying a definite NO on this with (at least MY version) an explanation: we ALL (yup, even me! :eek:) do this: we tend to look at bikes only in terms of CC’s =Cubic Centimeters (or CI=Cubic Inches) rather then the Physical Being – i.e., just how BIG (large) is this dang thing?! Can ‘I’ comfortably plant my feet down firmly on the ground on this monster? Can I straddle it back and forth and not need a Wrecking Crew to come help me pick it up (if I drop it)?! Yikes? Can I even reach the friggin’ handlebars without doing a major Stretch?! I’m saying there’s probably few (if any?) bikes out there that couldn’t get you into serious trouble IF you don’t take it slow and easy while you’re going through this touch and go learning process.

All I’m saying is first and foremost, number ONE get on bikes you can feel comfortable sitting on – definitely feet planted firmly on the ground – NO tippy toes! Next, while you’re sitting there… be honest with your self: screw being cool – does this ride ‘feel’ too big for me (Scary? Hairy? You get my drift!)??! IF it feels too big then odds are it IS too big (for you to START on). Yes, look for smaller engine size bikes to start with, but primarily concentrate on the FIT first, then size Second. More often then not, Physical size and Engine size go hand in hand, But not always. Nuff’ said.

LRG

I've been looking around the internet, and I've seen lots of people who say that if you're getting your first bike, don't get a literbike (specifically a Honda CBR1000RR). Now, I'm wondering, is it really that bad to get one if you just don't ride like a maniac? It's not like just because you have a fast bike, you HAVE to go fast.
**********************************************************

The Right Tool For The Right Job… (because) …The More They Overtake The Plumbing,
The Easier It Is To Stop Up The Drain!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Personally, and I never said this if anyone asks, a GSXR600 with the 'traction control' (or whatever they call the adjustable mapping) set in the 'weak sauce' position might be tolerable. I like the new GSX-F if you're dead set for a sporty looking starter.
If the GSX-F is okay for a starter, would the SV650SF be okay too? It looks like they're both 650cc, although the GSX-F admittedly seems to be a bigger bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
If the GSX-F is okay for a starter, would the SV650SF be okay too? It looks like they're both 650cc, although the GSX-F admittedly seems to be a bigger bike.
If you are really dead set on the sport bike you may want to check out the Katana to see how it feels to sit on, they are a bit more tame than some of the other options (don't allow me to mislead you as they are still a really fast machine to be starting out on) I think that one has a more easily maintained balance at lower speed than some of the other sport bikes. If your interested in the cruisers at all you may want to try sitting on the Suzuki Boulevard S series (the S series are a good deal lighter than the M series or the C series) They make this bike as a 650cc weighing in at 365lbs, then as an 800cc (if this truely is a first bike for you this choice may be as high as you want to go perhaps the 650 would be a better choice but that will depend on your stature and comfort in reaching the controls and the ground) they also make one that is just shy of 1400cc and I suggest that you put that in the don't even think about it list. As a first bike I suggest buying something that is around 5 years old and under 600 cc as a general rule but that can vary by rider.
 
F

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
If the GSX-F is okay for a starter, would the SV650SF be okay too? It looks like they're both 650cc, although the GSX-F admittedly seems to be a bigger bike.
Yep, the SV 650 (I said a bit farther up it's horsepower) would be ok to start on but personally that would be as big as I would recommend.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,070 Posts
So how about other bikes, like Harleys, which aren't generally meant to go extremely fast, but they are well over the 1000cc mark? Is there something different about them?
They won't apply insane power at the top of the revs but they will tend to leap a little more at the low end. Another issue to consider is WEIGHT. Riding a heavy bike at low speeds can be very...taxing and once it starts to fall...

SV650 is a great bike! Love them. I would still suggest something like a dual sport for ease of use and expense issues...Lots of guys start on SVs and have successful careers.

You might google SV forums and talk to some!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I bought a GSX-R600 as my first bike (kinda ... I had a Ninja 250 10 years ago ... for 3 weeks, before I wrecked it).

I started off riding it in the C and B modes that reduce the power, until i got used to it and felt comfortable with throttle control, etc. Now I ride full blast and its fine. If you genuinly want to ride slow and safe you would be fine. If you know you have that inner speed demon just begging to come out then stay away from the temptation. Myself, I enjoy a little excelleration here and there but I don't really have a big desire for high speeds at all. I goose it maybe once a week about halfway through 1st gear .... to about 60 MPH, and I have my thrill for the week. I think thats reasonable.

Anyway, its all a matter of what type of person you are. Don't lie to yourself so you can talk yourself into what you want. If you were buying a GSX-R, a 600 would be as good as a 1000, because you dont NEED (or want) the difference as a beginner.

Good luck, happy hunting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
I just gone done taking my safety class this morning and one of the students with 0 experience said during introductions that he planed on buying a suzuki hayabusa. When he said this the instructor literally hung his head and said to the student that "there is about a 75% chance that you will be dead or in the hospital within a month of buying that bike, please do all of us a favor avoid being a statistic by buying a smaller bike, please." The guy was very embarrassed at the time, and only added to his shame by looking ridiculous over the two day course. He had one of the lower scores in the riding test and never looked very confident while riding. I pray that this humbled him enough to look for something more reasonable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Yep, the SV 650 (I said a bit farther up it's horsepower) would be ok to start on but personally that would be as big as I would recommend.
Hold up a sec...

There's a SV 650, and an SV 650 SF, the SF being considered a sport-bike.

Which one are you talking about?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,514 Posts
If the GSX-F is okay for a starter, would the SV650SF be okay too? It looks like they're both 650cc, although the GSX-F admittedly seems to be a bigger bike.
I ride a SV650S and it is, IMO, a Borderline do-able beginner bike. It can wheely pretty easy, BUT has a wide usable power band and is much, much easier to ride in town when you are learning the feel of the friction zone w/o biting you in the a**. The problem with a lot of the inline 4s like the litre bikes or even the Honda CBR600RR is the on-off throttle response. Doesn't mater how much you "respect" the power or how you are not trying to race anybody, you hit a bump and grab a little too much throttle.. like a HAIR too much... or hit the throttle a tad hard coming out of a corner... and you are lofting the front wheel, or you are on your rear end. These are typical newbie mistakes on any bike, but it's how the bike is going to respond. BUT if you are set on a GSXR, the 600 is hard for a beginner, but al ot better than a litre bike.

I've been riding a couple of years and much, much prefer the SV for in town all around riding than my husbands GSXR 1000, fun and fast though a litre bike is, it's a PITA in traffic. You ease up on clutch and ease on a little throttle, and you are in the backseat of the SUV in front of you (exaggerated to make a point ;). The GSX 500 would be much easier to learn on, regardless of your best intentions. Or of course the SV (whichever variant)

Check your local cycle trader for how many supersports --Honda CBR, Suzuki GSXRs.. there are for sale with less than 2000 miles on them. Typically they will say "cosmetic damage" or you will go look at them and see the fairings are trashed... they went DOWN often due to an inexperienced rider. Yeah, the salespeople get paid on COMMISSION.

Re: Harley question... totally different motor, gearing, torque, weight to horsepower ratio. 1000 cc on a cruiser is like 500 cc on a sportbike (in a simplified way)... think a Ferrari versus an SUV. Different handling, different purpose. Somewhere here recently... search for a thread on engine displacement that pretty well explains it. :)

Last thought in this ramble: you can learn to ride BETTER on a smaller sport bike. Any squid can squirt it fast in a straight line. With something more manageable, a smaller bike CAN and WILL tear up the twisties against the guys that started out on litre bikes that haven't mastered their power. :cool:

Let me know if you'd like to hear about the instructor at the sportbike tracktime racing school... who was riding a 500 cc Ninja.. and lapping all the wannabes on their Ducati 1098s, Busas, and CBR1000RRs. They could of course blow it out on the straights, but he'd come by on the turns like nothing you can imagine. It's the RIDER not the bike in those scenarios. :cool:
 
F

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Hold up a sec...

There's a SV 650, and an SV 650 SF, the SF being considered a sport-bike.

Which one are you talking about?
I think the only difference between the two is one has clip ons and a quarter fairing and the other has standard bars and no fairing
 
1 - 20 of 73 Posts
Top