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Alright so I drive a sport bike and I don't have fairings with speakers and such like the Gold Wing's, but I sing to myself while riding. I'd like to be able to listen to music while riding so I can sing with it, like some CCR, but I don't know if I should use earbuds because of the lack of being able to hear my surroundings. But if anyone else does please post about your technique and if you'd like what you listen to. Also any pros and cons of listening to music and specific ear buds that work better or worse in the helmet.

p.s. I listen to almost any rock besides screamo/the stuff you can't understand and every once in a while rap/pop.
 

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Rat Bike Extraordinaire
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I find that any comfortable pair of headphones with earbuds should be comfortable enough; there is a good pair at radio shack for like 20$ that hook over your ear. One thing that sounds like a good idea but isn't are the ear buds with rubber that stick in your ear; they REALLY block all sound out. I stick to hard plastic, i find you can hear outside noises pretty well, while also hearing the music over the sound of your bike and the wind.

There are some obvious safety issues regarding this though, and it is also really bad for your hearing.
 

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2007 Yamaha Road Star Silverado 1700
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One thing that sounds like a good idea but isn't are the ear buds with rubber that stick in your ear; they REALLY block all sound out. I stick to hard plastic, i find you can hear outside noises pretty well, while also hearing the music over the sound of your bike and the wind
I'd have to disagree with this. I have a pair of JVC Marshmallow in-ear ear buds that I use when I need GPS through my phone. When the GPS isn't speaking they are only slightly less effective than the earplugs I wear normally. Even if you were to play music they would be comparable.

I am a HUGE proponent of wearing earplugs while riding. I usually find that the people who say they won't wear them because they block out traffic noise have never worn them (much like the guys who say they won't wear a full face helmet because it blocks too much vision). All ear plugs do is block out the noise... I can still hear that car whizzing past me, the horns honking, and the ambulance sirens just fine while wearing them.
 

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Rat Bike Extraordinaire
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To each his own, i suppose, though I will readily concede that i am not a fan of the rubber earbuds in general :) Could very well be a prejuduce, as i find them uncomfortable as hell
 

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Just wanted to make a suggestion and say make sure you check with your local dmv and see if it's even legal to ware head phones/buds even if it's only one ear during driving.
 

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Just wanted to make a suggestion and say make sure you check with your local dmv and see if it's even legal to wear head phones/buds even if it's only one ear during driving.
And even in the states where it's legal, you can get cited for being "encumbered" if the trooper feels you're not aware of the traffic around you because you're "plugged in."

Oregon State Police here think riding/driving w/ MP3 earbuds is a really stupid idea. And they're looking for a reason to cite you for being "encumbered."

"Encumbered" is a term used to cite drivers for having a dog or other pet in their lap, arm around the G/F, holding a burger w/ both hands, applying makeup, flossing teeth, changing clothes . . . In Oregon and Washington it's now unlawful to use anything other than a "hands-free" cell phone. Checking your cell phone to see who's calling will get you a $142 citation as a "moving violation." Tuning in your MP3 player will get you the same ticket.
 

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FYI, listenng to music in one ear only for a long time will seriously screw up your hearing. It also makes your brain unhappy when it only hears a sound in one ear. That's the reason stereo headphones have "listener fatigue" over time since the brain is used to hearing sounds in both ears (reflected sound) even when a sound source is directly on one side of the head. It's also why we designed "sound field simulators" that blend a small amount of signal across to the other channel, but with only one earpiece, you can't do that.
 
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