Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
411 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been noticing a fair number of riders with their left hand on their hip as they ride.
It seems there are too many for it to be purely coincidental.

Can someone 'splain?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,122 Posts
The left hand is the only one you can take off the grips, so if you want to rest a hand it's got to be the left one. And the left hip or the left thigh is the easiest place to rest it.

I do find I'm riding along with my left hand on my left hip sometimes on long runs. When I've got my wife on the pillion I often reach back and rest my left hand on the outside of her left calf.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,169 Posts
I alternately rest my hands on long rides. Right hand requires that the cruise be on but that is also how I avoid speeding too often. When I don't use my cruise my speed just keeps on slowly climbing. I can rest my left any time that I am not shifting.
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,871 Posts
The left hand is the only one you can take off the grips, so if you want to rest a hand it's got to be the left one. And the left hip or the left thigh is the easiest place to rest it.

I do find I'm riding along with my left hand on my left hip sometimes on long runs. When I've got my wife on the pillion I often reach back and rest my left hand on the outside of her left calf.
^^^ Yeap.
 

·
ZAMM Fanatic
Joined
·
2,730 Posts
Yoga-cycle

With the left hand on the hip you can rotate your shoulders/spine a few degrees to the left and relieve the back muscles a little bit.

Ya set the throttle lock to do it to the right side.

Us old guys, we get stiff (in a very different way than you youngsters do), so doing Yoga while heading down the road is pretty standard practice -- windmilling the arms, leg raises, neck swivels & rolls, ...

Here's Tommy Lee Jones doing it in "Men In Black" --- tunnel scene:

fast forward to 1:07 if you're in a hurry...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9YfEZtQBtY
 

·
Aging & Worn
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
I usually rest my hand on my leg.
Ditto the above. Whenever possible, on good road in limited traffic, I rest my left hand on my left leg.

As I see a bike approaching, I often drop my left hand off the bars, preparing to do "the wave" thing, if I am not engaged in some driving that requires my hand keep busy.

In THAT case, a simple nod, or wave of the fingers while gripping the left side of the handlebars, will just have to suffice.

In addition, with regard to "the wave," I don't typically wave at other bikers on the other side of the Highway (usually only on Secondary roads). You? The highway is too busy a place to be ________ around!

-Soupy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
I haven't got to the point yet where I feel comfortable taking one hand off the wheel for too too long. Only been riding a little while. But I find myself having to shake the throttle hand every now and then to wake it up. When I'm riding on the back, people ask me all the time how I can ride without holding on to the driver. I tend to just squeeze my knees against him during corners and take off. There's less pull back on the driver and frees up my hands to do other things. I tend to scan for cagers at intersections and then I will hold on if I fear the cage may make a move and this is one of our signals that there may be an emergency stop in the near future. Its all about having trust in the bike and rider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
I keep both hands on the handle bars. Just to make sure that if something happens, my reaction will be as fast as possible. With one hand on your hip, you add two or three seconds to your reaction time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,331 Posts
I'm surprised no one here has heard of this new pose for motorcyclists to show their opposition to President Obama's policies. It started in Mississippi, I think, so anytime you see a rider with his left hand on his/her hip it is showing their political feelings. An alternative sign is to put either foot on the front pegs, or keep your right hand on the throttle. It is apparently getting more popular all the time, and may soon rival the motorcycle wave!
 

·
Commute Racer
Joined
·
2,225 Posts
It's a way for sportbike riders to ride with less weight forward, taking pressure off their wrists. I don't have occasion to ride much beyond an hour and a half, but utilize this technique on occasion when I am stuck behind a cop and can't use the speed of the wind to press me upright.

I also sometimes rest my left elbow crossways on the tank.
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top