Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Howdy.....I just got a 1995 Nighthawk 750....I've got a lot to learn. But this is where I'm at. This morning I took my air filter out to inspect it(though I don't even know what I was looking for or at)... but anyway I re-installed the air filter now fuel is pouring out of the drainage tube between the right 2 carbs. I tried to take out and put the air filter back in several times with no luck so far. Please advise if you can... thanks
 

·
ZAMM Fanatic
Joined
·
2,730 Posts
Air filter's got nothing to do with it. Youv'e got a stuck float in one of the right carbs. Try tapping on it to see if it'll let go. If not, shut off the fuel petcock, and proceed with carburetor rebuild. Always install NEW fuel filter after carb rebuild.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Wade, the words carb rebuild makes me go cross eyed at this point in my motorcycle life. Where would you try to tap on the carb at?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,162 Posts
Usually tapping on the bottom of the bowl with a plastic handle of a screwdriver will do.
Ok,I have a 1985 nighthawk and I have some questions for you. First,on the petcock, is there one fuel line from the tank,or is there a second smaller vacuum line? My petcock has the vacuum line and with that feature working correctly,no way would gas be pouring out.

I have taken my tank off the bike without shutting off the petcock [by mistake],and the gas will not come out of the tank at all
 

·
ZAMM Fanatic
Joined
·
2,730 Posts
What I suggest for new owners /old bikes having problems is to go ahead and PULL the carbs off yourself, order the rebuild kits on ebay or bikebandit or wherever, but PAY an old hand to rebuild them for you.

When one of the bowl screws strips and refuses to come out, you want a guy who's dealt with that many times before instead of YOU dealing with it --

Take pictures during disassembly, lay the parts out in the order you took 'em off, take pictures of that, and ..do it all on a tarp so you don't lose any little parts.

Soak the rubber boots in Xylene/wintergreen oil overnight if you need to soften 'em to get 'em back on.

Most times rebuilding the carbs makes an older machine run like a brand new bike. You just don't realize how much crud builds up in them and how much it's slowing you down.

this white POS I'm sitting on went from being a bucking bronco to a learjet after a carb rebuild.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I can add to this, I just got my first bike up and running (1984 vt500ft). Has been a 2 year project, I had to rebuild the carbs too. I would suggest getting in there yourself for the knowledge of how to do it, I have had to do things this way to even get on the road and it has been rewarding. As far as rebuilding carbs, if you were to do them yourself, there are tons of tutorials on youtube by experienced people. Thats what I followed, and I had no issues figuring it out. Just take your time and have plenty of handy tools around. Just like Wadenelson stated, some of the screws might be fragile and brittle from old age. I actually have a tutorial I started but never finished regarding refurbishing old carbs. Mine sat for 13 years and I got them like new again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,168 Posts
A carb rebuild kit is mostly things like gaskets so it is fairly cheap to buy. Considering how long it has been since I did one I bet it is up to $20 or so by now. If you have multiple carbs you will need to synch them after the rebuild. You use manometers on the vacuum tap on each carb to get them all the same as each other on a bike. On a car I did it by taking each carb to the same idle point with the other one out of the picture temporarily.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top