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Discussion Starter #1
Before I start let me note this, if I get a Versys it will only be a 2015 model. I can't stand the previous years looks. Whereas a Strom I could go back as far as 2008. I start my saving for the bike now at $0 so finding an affordable Versys will be considerably harder and take a lot more time. That said;

Any opinions out there on which bike would be best for mostly paved road with maybe 10% dirt thrown in?

This will be my first bike, I have already passed the BRC and have my license though I need some major practice before street ready.

From what I have read online the Versys is the more sporty and fun bike while the V-Strom can handle dirt a bit better. Since neither of these will handle dirt very well at all I figured I would want the one that could handle it better, but I am afraid I will lose out on the fun quality of the Versys.

I don't understand what makes the Versys more fun, just the way it handles? The 0-60 on the Strom is faster than the Versys.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I almost feel like the strom would be a better bike because it seems like it would be smoother and more stable, whereas on the versys I won't be able to appreciate the sporty/fun factor enough as I am learning.

Also I haven't been able to sit on either, there are none within an hour drive right now and we have a big trip coming up so I haven't been able to get away. Though maybe we'll pass some cycle shops on our 36 hours drive to Canada and I will get to sit on one or the other. Heck if I find a used one maybe I can take a test drive.

I do plan to test drive both before making a final decision. I just about eliminated the KLR, I don't think I will even attempt to test drive it.
 

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For a new rider, the differences will be negligible. A new rider won't be able to ride either bike to its limit, whether it be on pavement or dirt.

To buy a new bike is not wise, IMO. The likelihood of a new rider dropping their first bike is really high...this Summer we had a poll and almost everyone said they had dropped their bike. So along with high depreciation losses, you will also lose some value due to body damage. We all did it. Consider these two scenarios...

#1 You buy a brand new Versys. Out the door cost is about $9000. You ride it for 3 years, drop it lightly once, then decide you want more bike, or a different bike. You sell it for $5000. Net loss is $4000

#2 You buy a 7-10 year old V-Strom for $4500. You ride it for 3 years, drop it lightly once, then decide you want more bike, or a different bike. You sell it for $3500. Net loss is $1000.

In scenario #2, you have ridden a bike for 3 years and still recouped most of your money. Most motorcyclists would be happy with this outcome.

In scenario #1, you have lost nearly half the value of your bike. This loss could almost buy the bike from scenario #2 outright.

And that other thought that you might be having..."But l won't necessarily want a new bike in 3 years". We all think that with our first bike. But reality is, it's your first bike, not your last. Few people keep their first bike as their main ride longterm.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the input, I totally expect to drop it at some point. That is what sucks about the Versys, I don't have any other option if I want that bike but to buy new. I wish they had the same design through the years but I just can't stand anything pre-2015.

I will probably end up doing what you said, pick up a v-strom and in a few years if I decide I really want a versys I can make the switch and by that point they will have some used and cheaper ones.

Maybe cycles are a different world from cars so it will be a learning experience. I know with kayaks they hold their value well (even though they get scratched up) and regretting buying one is not bad because you can resale easily. But with cars I always plan to never sell them once I buy them. I had my 95 4runner from age 16-26 and it was finally shot (more work than I wanted to do) and now with my 2009 and 2010 yaris I plan to keep them for 10+ years unless I have kids who total them.
 

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There are exceptions to the rule. However, with motorcycles, l have found that as your skills change, your desired ride will also. Additionally, experiences can change your outlook. Maybe you go on an adventure ride and your buddy is tearing it up on his KTM and you lets you ride it, and all the way home all you can think about is selling your Versys. Or you go on a road trip with some Goldwingers and realize that is what you want to do. Almost always, motorcycling changes as you evolve.
 
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