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Discussion Starter #1
I got my M-Class about a year ago but haven't been able to actually get my hands on a bike yet till now. I've finally talked my dad into letting me buy his starter bike off of him but it'll need some work before it'll actually be ride worthy. so far all I know of that it needs is fender replacement which I'm sure I can figure out myself, windshield replacement, which if I decide to do it I'm sure I can figure it out, battery replacement, which I've done before, and carb rebuild or replacement (and I'm sure oil change... it's been sitting in the garage for like 4 years).

Can anyone give me some advice on either how to rebuild the carb or how to select a new carb to replace it with? Today is the last day of finals so after today I will actually be able to have time to work on it and that will be my first project this summer so I would really like to get an idea what all I need to work on.

As far as I know there's nothing really actually wrong with the bike other than just that it's been sitting for way too long and the fender and windshield is broken cuz when my dad first tried to teach me to ride he put me 3 feet from the motor home, facing the motor home, and told me to get it up to speed to get my feet off the ground and then stop and I panicked and ended up dropping the bike under the motor home...

Is there anything else other than what I've listed that I should expect to have to do to it to get it running and inspectable?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I am also thinking about changing out the handlebars with some mid sized ape hangers. I don't really like the handlebars being so low and I sat on a bike about the same size as my bike and it had 9" ape hangers and they were so comfortable. Anything I need to know about where to get those and how to install them? I'm sure there's at least some kinda wiring that I'm going to have to do to them right?
 

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The main thing about cleaning carbs is that they have to be really clean. Even microscopically small deposits in the wrong place can really mess them up.

I use carb dip after complete dissassembly, rinse with water, and compressed air to blow everything out. I'd recommend reading and understanding the manual as far as taking the carb apart and putting it back together, especially the first time. There are a lot of tiny parts!

Putting on longer handlebars usually means an extension of all the wiring to the controls, brake lines and any cables such as throttle and clutch. It can be a big job to get everything right.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The main thing about cleaning carbs is that they have to be really clean. Even microscopically small deposits in the wrong place can really mess them up.

I use carb dip after complete dissassembly, rinse with water, and compressed air to blow everything out. I'd recommend reading and understanding the manual as far as taking the carb apart and putting it back together, especially the first time. There are a lot of tiny parts!

Putting on longer handlebars usually means an extension of all the wiring to the controls, brake lines and any cables such as throttle and clutch. It can be a big job to get everything right.
so would it probably be easier to just buy a new one that's already ready to drop in? and are there any tips on finding the right carb?
 

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It might be easier to buy a new carb, but a lot more expensive. It would be cheaper to have it done at a shop if you aren't comfortable with it.
 
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