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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys!

First post here! I just wanted to confirm that my clutch is completely shot.
I wonder how it happen tho, seem to my that the clutch cable was to tight?
Or the last owner really liked dumping the clutch.
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American Legion Rider
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Yep, exactly what bpe stated. And here is a vid to help so you won't ruin a second clutch.

 

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Hey guys!

First post here! I just wanted to confirm that my clutch is completely shot.
The friction plates don't seem too bad. Was the clutch slipping? Did you measure
the plate thickness?

The steel plates are a bit cooked.


I wonder how it happen tho, seem to my that the clutch cable was to tight?
Or the last owner really liked dumping the clutch.
It looks as if they have seen some abuse.

The clutch on those is pretty robust. If the plates aren't warped, plate thickness
and clutch spring lengths are all within spec, I would clean up the steel plates,
reassemble the clutch, adjust correctly and test it on the road.

Obviously, if the plates are out-of-spec or the clutch is still
slipping after adjustment, you will need to replace with a full kit.

AFAIK, your bike uses the same air/oil cooled engine as my Suzuki Bandit.
There are two separate clutch adjustments: push-rod clearance and
cable slack. Make sure both are set correctly.
 

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Ace Tuner
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I can smell the burnt fiber plates from here...

That special(?) smaller one on the end is toast for sure. If the others are still within specs (thickness correct, not 'glazed') then you could probably use those. Be sure to "surface" the steel plates with ~ 360 wet/dry sandpaper, or maybe use a concrete floor.
In case you didn't already know, soak new fibers in oil before installation.


S F
 

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I read once they're supposed to be soaked in oil overnight, but I've read where people forgot to soak overnight and only soaked the new clutch for one or two hours before installing.
What is it supposed to be, a few hours or overnight? Just asking.
 

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American Legion Rider
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Ever wonder how they are installed at the factory assembly line. I suspect soaking overnight is best but soaking for a few hours will work just as well provided you are gentle with it as if it was a new bike break in period.
 

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I don't know if it is different on other bikes. But according to the manuals on my bikes (EX and XT), no soaking required. Just coat in oil prior to installation. Of coarse I'm sure you can soak them 'til the cows come home and it won't hurt anything. I can't imagine the friction discs having any soakability (is that a word?) to them anyway. If they did, wouldn't the discs swell up? Maybe not to the point to where you can see it with the naked eye, but could be measured with a micrometer. If it does it seems like it would make it difficult to accurately measure when checking to see if they are within spec.

On a side note:
I have never seen a (for lack of a better term) pad design like that on the friction discs in the above pic. It appears to look like there is no specific directional rotation to them. I would be curious to know if there is a specific directional rotation to them.
 

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Ace Tuner
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Soak the fiber plates in oil for how long?
I don't see how there could be a time limit, they do run in oil so..... "Dry" clutches do exist so don't soak those of course.
When convenient I put them in oil at the end of the day and let them soak till the job comes up the next day.
Seems like 30 mins should be long enough otherwise. As bpe said, getting them wet with oil might be enough with the latest plates but I'm still a soak-er.

bpe,
Are those Kawasaki and Yamaha FACTORY manuals that you are finding that information in?


S F
 
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