Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am 6' 1" and weigh ~225 pounds. I have a driver's license and recently got my motorcycle permit. I am looking for a vehicle that can offer me an affordable price, high fuel efficiency, enough power to ride on highways for road trips, and comfortability all around. I am a college student who wants to have an cheap, fun, and reliable ride.

I decided the motorcycle route is more affordable than cars, so here I am.

I really like the Honda PCX150, which is a scooter. It offers up to around 70mph without modifications (I believe) and estimated 100+mpg. Scooters are also pretty fun and comfortable...plus the storage under the seat is a huge plus. It is market listed at $3449, so probably around $4100/$4200 after the necessary registration expenses and whatnot.

I also have my eye on the Honda Rebel. It is a cruiser that gets up to around 85/90mph without modifications and estimated 80+mpg. I really like it's classic look that the Rebel has held on to over the years.

I want to know if you think either of these bikes are good for a frugal college student for the reasons I stated above. Also, please make other recommendations if you think another bike fits my needs better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
Neither one of those you mentioned will go those speeds. Just because the speedo says it doesn't mean you'll ever peg it out. Throw in your size, fully wet, and ride conditions and you'll be luck to hit 55mph on the scooter and 70mph on the rebel. Neither of them is made for a lot of highway use either, and the scooter I wouldn't even think about it. In town running around to college, both are perfect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Neither one of those you mentioned will go those speeds. Just because the speedo says it doesn't mean you'll ever peg it out. Throw in your size, fully wet, and ride conditions and you'll be luck to hit 55mph on the scooter and 70mph on the rebel. Neither of them is made for a lot of highway use either, and the scooter I wouldn't even think about it. In town running around to college, both are perfect.
Those numbers weren't just based on the speedometer. They were real numbers retrieved from reviews and recorded test runs. I can't say I know from personal experience, but a video capture of it can't lie.

Also, according to the reviews I have read, the scooter is fine for highway and freeway use, and the Rebel even more so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
Then they are modified some how. I have a 2012 Suzuki TU250, I am 5'9/175lbs and mine is just about spent in perfect conditions at 78mph. My neighbor has Rebel and he hasn't got it over 72mph yet and he is the same size as me. I also had a 150cc scooter for three years in Hawaii and it was governed at 60mph. But if you feel those will do what you need them to, then go for it. Be careful with both on the highway, you will know when a vehicle is about to pass you!
 
G

·
I wouldn't go less than a 450cc for highway riding, especially
seeing where you're a big guy. Take a look at a Honda VLX,
or a Yamaha 650 Vstar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I wouldn't go less than a 450cc for highway riding, especially
seeing where you're a big guy. Take a look at a Honda VLX,
or a Yamaha 650 Vstar.
Those two sure are pretty sweet bikes. The only problem is that I am looking for a low price bike that has good fuel efficiency. They are a bit low on the MPG for me to justify as a reason to not get a car. I was hoping to get something in the seventies, or close, or higher. It appears that there aren't too many bikes with enough power but high fuel efficiency. Are you aware of any exceptions?

If not, I may just go with the Rebel or PCX150 and only ride on the highway occasionally.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
685 Posts
Also, according to the reviews I have read, the scooter is fine for highway and freeway use, and the Rebel even more so.
You can believe whatever you want but nothing with a 150 CC engine is "fine" for highway use.....nothing. A 250 motorcycle, just barely.

In your present situation, I think a slightly larger scooter is the answer: 250-450 CCs or so.

You also need to realize that an actual motorcycle probably will NOT be cheaper to operate in the long run. The cost of tires and maintenance can quickly eat up the savings in gas. And riding on 2 wheels in the rain is no fun.

I'm surprised that nobody mentioned getting some formal training. The MSF course, or equivalent, it highly recommended.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have been talking to my uncle, a seasoned motorcyclist. He agrees that the small bikes are no good for extensive highway use. He also recommended that I take the safety course. I plan to in the Spring. He does however, recommend the 150cc scooter for me because I am a college student who doesn't need much highway use...just occasional short use if needed.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
685 Posts
He does however, recommend the 150cc scooter for me because I am a college student who doesn't need much highway use...just occasional short use if needed.
HE knows you and the situation better than WE do.

Sounds like good advice; you should pay attention. :biggrin:

If you are looking at NEW scooters, that isn't the best option for a College student......most of the time.

The best option is something you can pay cash for.
Failing that, something low mileage used can often be had for half the price of new.
The last resort should be financing a new machine........and that should be undertaken ONLY if it is a necessity and not a "toy".

Students taking on debt is NOT a good lesson to be learning. :icon_cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
Have you sat on a Rebel yet? It is a tiny bike, my 5'10" wife deemed it too physically small for her. I think you'd eclipse the thing. I am 6'2" and sat on it, and was completely accordian'd. :)

The Yamaha v-star 250s were probably the biggest bikes physically that we found in that class of cruiser. One dealer had 3 of them used, 2 2011's and 1 2012, all with less than 500 miles on them. The salesman said people buy those then trade them in weeks or months later, so a good deal can be had on something like that. Let the other person take the depreciation hit. Wife ended up with a 2007 V-Star 650 with 1700 miles for around $4300.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I ride the same bike as jrw69 and agree, it can get up to around 75mph but it isn't pretty. Around the city it's an urban warrior that can (with skilled shifting) out accelerate cars.

I bought mine as a starter bike and am looking to upgrade probably in about a year. I will look for something in the 600 - 800 cc range. I am very glad I am starting on a 250 though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I go to college in Shippensburg, PA. I am in farm country when I leave campus and the immediate town. Most of my driving will be on roads at speeds no more than 55mph, so either bike would suffice. I would have the occasional highway ride if there isn't a back road going to where I want to be, but since that would be the minority of my riding, the PCX150 or the Rebel would work for me.

My uncle tells me that when he rides, he prefers the back roads because they are less aggressive and often more scenic, making for a fun and relaxing ride...even for a 150cc scooter. :)

Do you guys agree?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
I go to college in Shippensburg, PA. I am in farm country when I leave campus and the immediate town. Most of my driving will be on roads at speeds no more than 55mph, so either bike would suffice. I would have the occasional highway ride if there isn't a back road going to where I want to be, but since that would be the minority of my riding, the PCX150 or the Rebel would work for me.

My uncle tells me that when he rides, he prefers the back roads because they are less aggressive and often more scenic, making for a fun and relaxing ride...even for a 150cc scooter. :)

Do you guys agree?
I think theres nothing wrong with a scooter, if a scooter is what you want. If you want a motorcycle, I think you'll never be happy with a scooter. To me a scooter is an urban runabout device.

I maintain that you'll never fit on that Rebel at your height, I am only 1" taller than you, and I couldn't ride that bike safely. The handlebars were hitting my knees and I wouldn't be able to actuate the controls with the crazy leg/ankle angles. My shorter wife looked cramped on it and deemed it "too uncomfortable". It is a great/reliable little bike, but its for little people.

A 250 motorcycle will do you just fine, but take it from someone that just finished doing massive research and looking at every bike in every local store. Your best bet would be a Suzuki TU250X or a Yamaha V-Star 250 as these offer a slightly more friendly physical size for your stature. That is what I wanted (the Suzuki), but at 6'2" I decided I couldn't buy either one because I couldn't get comfortable on them. The small bike is nice to learn on, but I feel that if its an ergonomic nightmare, that this poses significant risk as well. I ended up buying a Honda Shadow 750.

Before you make any firm decision on the bike, take the MSF Basic Rider Course. This will give you a chance to ride a small 250cc motorcycle and learn how to do basic maneuvers. Chances are, your opinions will be different when you exit that class.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,160 Posts
I am about your size and weight. Perhaps you could think about an older bike. You will lose a little on gas mileage,but make up for that with cheap cost of ownership and insurance.
The term UJM [Universal Japanese Motorcycle] describes a class of motorcycle with seat height,position of the foot pegs pretty much directly beneath the rider, and they fit me [seat height 31"] and the way I like to ride on rough back roads. I ride with my feet on the front pegs always ready to put weight on them. When you are on a light bike and the suspension bottoms out on a big bump, pushing your feet against the pegs takes the load off your back.
My go to bike is a little CB360 Honda, and I just ride the **** out of it. Easily goes 60-70 MPH. These bikes are tough and easy to repair ,but you do need to keep checking fastener tightness so parts don't loosen and fall off. Mine was purchased and on the road with new tires for a total cost of $400.00. You might find a good one in great shape this time of year for $1000.00. Ask your uncle. Also you probably will need his advice on who to get to keep it running because the new bike dealers as a rule are not interested in working on the old bikes.
There are tons of the 350-500 CC twin cylinder bikes out there, but Hondas as a rule have more parts you can still get at the dealer. The more common the bike the more likely you can get parts for it
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top