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Discussion Starter #21
Great looking bike. I saw another post on another subject and the guy gave some great advice. Always ride like you think you are invisible. Never assume some one sees you and don't think the "right of way" makes things ok. Enjoy your rides!!
Yup, some good advice here and it was one of the recommended starter bikes. It was priced right, great condition and the seller was easy to work with. Best part was seeing it and knowing it felt right. The other bikes I saw prior were nice but didn't feel like this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I go one step further about being invisible. I assume they are all literally going to try to kill me. So I just know they are going to do the very thing I don’t want them to so I’m prepared for it.
My instructors at the riding course at DMV truly emphasized safety and it wasn't lost on me. I will always ride like 100% of the risk is on me and do what I can to remain safe.
 

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Congrats!!! That thing looks way cooler than what was one of my first bikes (a Honda Rebel and a Buell Blast). Good advice all around here. Ride like every car will attempt to run you off the road. Additionally, it does help to wear gear that's more visible (be it retroreflective or a bright color) and practice skills in a parking lot so you know your limits and your bike's limits.

Ahhhh, nothing like that feeling of the first bike. Whats nice about bikes is that feeling never goes away, it comes back every time you get a new one. Congratulations, it looks great.
THIS!! Even if I pick up an old beater of a bike I get those feelings all over again. :)

It always breaks my heart to see decade or older bikes with four figure odometer readings. I put 11K miles on my 2019 R3 in a span of a few months. Hopefully you put on more miles than the previous owner(s) did.
It somewhat makes sense here in the Midwest where the weather is hardly kind. So if you're a rider that only enjoys warm, sunny days you basically gotta get in all your miles on those few days.

These low mileage bikes sadden me as well...unless I'm the buyer and I get to experience an almost new very old bike. lol
 

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Congrats!!! That thing looks way cooler than what was one of my first bikes (a Honda Rebel and a Buell Blast). Good advice all around here. Ride like every car will attempt to run you off the road. Additionally, it does help to wear gear that's more visible (be it retroreflective or a bright color) and practice skills in a parking lot so you know your limits and your bike's limits.


THIS!! Even if I pick up an old beater of a bike I get those feelings all over again. :)


It somewhat makes sense here in the Midwest where the weather is hardly kind. So if you're a rider that only enjoys warm, sunny days you basically gotta get in all your miles on those few days.

These low mileage bikes sadden me as well...unless I'm the buyer and I get to experience an almost new very old bike. lol
David Tracy and I live in the same state, so I am no stranger to crappy weather. I am just crazy and used my R3 as my commuter, despite having a 2017 Civic Si and a 2010 CRV at the time.

Riding in crappy weather is not as fun as riding in nice weather but I learned a lot doing it, gear makes a huge impact on what weather conditions you can handle.

And yes, while the low mileage examples do make me feel for the bike, it makes my wallet feel happier; it will be nice to find a low mile sport bike to convert into a dedicated track day bike in the future.
 

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Riding in crappy weather is not as fun as riding in nice weather but I learned a lot doing it, gear makes a huge impact on what weather conditions you can handle.
Absolutely. The better the gear the better the ride will be in poor weather conditions. Rain gear especially. You can get away with cheap Frogg Togg type with just light showers but you need the good stuff for frog choking rain. (y)
 

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Absolutely. The better the gear the better the ride will be in poor weather conditions. Rain gear especially. You can get away with cheap Frogg Togg type with just light showers but you need the good stuff for frog choking rain. (y)
I have rode in heavy rain in chillier temps using the REV'IT! Cyclone 2 H2O Rain Jacket ($65) with the REV'IT! Acid H2O Rain Pants ($45) and REV'IT! Hydra 2 H2O Gloves ($99); I was bone dry at the end of my rides each time.

I may look into more premium rain gear but that will have to wait till I use up my current items; I may also look into more ADV like gear as well if I start touring longer distances.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Just dropped it off at the shop for a general health check up to be sure all is in order. I'll probably change the oil and brake fluid as I was told it should be clear and it isn't. The tires will also be checked but I'm pretty sure they'll be changed. After that I'll be all set!

Gear already seems important and I'm not all that experienced. It's why I chose to get quality gloves, helmet and jacket. Still need pants and boots but I'm working on it.

I live in the NE so I'm no stranger to harsh weather. It hasn't been terrible the last few years so I suspect I'll be able to ride during the winter but won't push it since I'm still a new rider.
 

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Just dropped it off at the shop for a general health check up to be sure all is in order. I'll probably change the oil and brake fluid as I was told it should be clear and it isn't. The tires will also be checked but I'm pretty sure they'll be changed. After that I'll be all set!

Gear already seems important and I'm not all that experienced. It's why I chose to get quality gloves, helmet and jacket. Still need pants and boots but I'm working on it.

I live in the NE so I'm no stranger to harsh weather. It hasn't been terrible the last few years so I suspect I'll be able to ride during the winter but won't push it since I'm still a new rider.
Make sure you find riding specific boots. A lot of people wear something like work boots and think they will be durable enough. The issue is work boots are not designed around the idea of riding, they may hold well under work use but they may not hold as well if you happen to have an off and slide across pavement.

Another issue is white paint, which if it happens to be wet for any reason becomes slippery. At a light that can be an issue if you happen to step on say a left turn arrow. I have a short inseam and rode a R3 and usually preferred to put down one foot instead of tip toeing both of my feet, which some people call tripoding. The soles of my riding boots grip the road surface better and saved me some embarrassment one or two times when riding in the rain when I had not realized I put my foot down on white paint.

Thankfully on a cruiser you should be able to put down both feet on most road surfaces. The downside of a cruiser is usually they weigh more on average. This means if the bike leans in one direction more than the other while you are balancing it, that foot will have more weight placed on it. Having better grip would make this easier to manage and reduces the chances of that foot losing grip and you falling over.

People place a lot of value in how well their tires grip the road surface but then ignore the fact our feet also interact with the road surface. Gear can be a hassle for a lot of people but it honestly helps make the ride more comfortable if you wear the correct gear options. Even on a hot weather days, you can find the correct gear; I would argue wearing a jacket on a hot day helps by preventing sunburn, I'd rather sweat than deal with burnt skin.
 

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Just dropped it off at the shop for a general health check up to be sure all is in order. I'll probably change the oil and brake fluid as I was told it should be clear and it isn't. The tires will also be checked but I'm pretty sure they'll be changed. After that I'll be all set!

Gear already seems important and I'm not all that experienced. It's why I chose to get quality gloves, helmet and jacket. Still need pants and boots but I'm working on it.

I live in the NE so I'm no stranger to harsh weather. It hasn't been terrible the last few years so I suspect I'll be able to ride during the winter but won't push it since I'm still a new rider.
I have been real happy with my Sedici boots. They took a beating when I crashed and they protected my feet and ankles well. A great boot for the money.
 

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And for those that like to wear cowboy boots, don't. At least if you don't want them cut off should you crash. I'll swear EMT's get a kick out of cutting off you expensive cowboys. They sure did in my crash. The boots I wear today(Gasolina) have a zipper up the back so they have no reason to cut them off if I was ever to crash again which I certainly hope never happens and will be doing everything not to.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
My main concern with boots was them being too big and making it difficult to shift. Is that not the case? Right now I wear a casual leather boot but they aren't riding boots. Leather footwear was required for my DMV course and I just stuck with them but I also haven't went very far yet.

I'll look in to Sedici Boots. Thanks for the tip!
 

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My main concern with boots was them being too big and making it difficult to shift. Is that not the case? Right now I wear a casual leather boot but they aren't riding boots. Leather footwear was required for my DMV course and I just stuck with them but I also haven't went very far yet.

I'll look in to Sedici Boots. Thanks for the tip!
Not at all, they are designed for shifting and comfortable riding.
 

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My main concern with boots was them being too big and making it difficult to shift. Is that not the case? Right now I wear a casual leather boot but they aren't riding boots. Leather footwear was required for my DMV course and I just stuck with them but I also haven't went very far yet.

I'll look in to Sedici Boots. Thanks for the tip!
I wear a full sport bike boot, they were much more comfortable and designed around my style of bike.

I did try out more casual options and I had a harder time shifting with my riding shoes, so I wear them casual now instead of riding with them.

Anything that is designed around riding should actually be better suited for the task than something designed for a different activity.

For instance, most riding footwear will have shift pads on them to help with shifting.
 

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I wear a full sport bike boot, they were much more comfortable and designed around my style of bike.

I did try out more casual options and I had a harder time shifting with my riding shoes, so I wear them casual now instead of riding with them.

Anything that is designed around riding should actually be better suited for the task than something designed for a different activity.

For instance, most riding footwear will have shift pads on them to help with shifting.
Mt Sedici boots are somewhere between a sport boot and a cruiser boot...pretty nondescript. I can wear them with my T-Bird, my V Strom, my Scrambler or a dual sport. They have no laces and they are comfortable. I got them on Revzilla for like $129
 

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I tried several types of boots until I found what works best for me. I wear Bates lightweight tactical boots, designed for police I believe. These have laces so they can be adjusted to fit perfectly, and a side zipper so they can be put on and off quickly. I tied the laces in a square knot with no loops so there is less to get caught on anything and I haven't had a problem.
They are almost as light as a decent pair of sneakers, almost as solid as a work boot, and comfortable to ride or walk in. The walking matters for me too, I hate changing at work, and motorcycle specific boots were too heavy and awkward for walking all day. These are the most comfortable pair of shoes I have ever owned, and they wear well, I'm breaking in a new pair now, the soles of the old ones are finally wearing out after 70K miles of riding and 2 years walking around on hot asphalt at the airport 12 hours a day.
 
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