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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've come to the conclusion, that most of the control of the bike during riding, is being done by the upper body.

Sure, my left foot is shifting and my right foot is braking, but for the most part, is it from the hips up, that does most of the work.

That's a GOOD thing, in MY case, since my legs and lower body are as weak as they are.

-Soupy
 

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Premium Member
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Legs

Your legs and knees do a lot of work. You do not realize it until you get very muscle tired, and the bike starts to move around under you.
This is most noticeable during long hard cross country ( off road ) races.
But you will notice it on the highway after many miles.
My knees are clamped to the tank on the Suzuki sport bike, but the big Yamaha is a different shape, and there is not much you can do with the legs and knees.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Crusty: Yep, I would expect that off road riders would be using a TON of energy from the waist down, as well as upper body.

My scenario of riding is on paved roads. I've heard of using the legs to "hug the tank," and there are times when that becomes necessary, on a tight turn, but not all the time.

-Soupy
 

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American Legion Rider
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Or take a 4 month rest from riding and you will see just what hurts bad after your first ride.:) I was surprised myself.
 

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On a touring bike like my dearly departed 2012 Goldwing, the only muscles a person uses is their hands-clutch and brake, the left foot for the gears and the right foot for the brake. More comfortable than sitting in your Lazy Boy recliner:biggrin:

My past 2010 Buell 1125R Superbike, seemed to require most all of the muscle groups working in perfect harmony, just to keep from getting killed. More comfortable than sitting on a fence post---just barely.

I raced semi-pro dirt bikes in Southern, CA for many years, in the desert, Baja and every kind of track imaginable, plus ISDT enduro events-stateside and even trials events. My first trial trophy was in 1963.

In 1975 I decided that I wanted another new trials bike with the idea of competing again. I bought a new Kawasaki KT250 and took it to Saddleback Park, a famous multi-purpose riding park, in Irvine, CA.

There were hundreds of trials type areas to ride on and I rode most of the day. I remember thinking that the bike if ridden correctly required all kinds of un-real physical movements, that I'd forgotten about. I found out very quickly that age and a lack of youthful agility, not to mention being off of a trials bike for 13+ years, had taken it's toll.

For about a week after that experience, it was all I could do to even walk or to bend more than a few degrees!

I have another story about riding a friends quarter horse that got away from me in the Ozarks about 40 years ago and--------.:biggrin:

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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I have another story about riding a friends quarter horse that got away from me in the Ozarks about 40 years ago and--------.:biggrin:

Sam:coffeescreen:
We could probably swap tales. Growing up around a cow/calf operation meant cow ponies. My dad assigned the job of breaking colts to me. Everything got a workout... upper body, lower body and especially whatever part you landed on.

But to keep from derailing the thread, it seems as if my lower body is doing more of the work when riding. Maybe the upper half just goes to sleep... :biggrin:
 

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I've come to the conclusion, that most of the control of the bike during riding, is being done by the upper body.

Sure, my left foot is shifting and my right foot is braking, but for the most part, is it from the hips up, that does most of the work.

That's a GOOD thing, in MY case, since my legs and lower body are as weak as they are.

-Soupy
Funny you should say that.. Last Saturday was my first day back in the gym after a little over 2 months of being away and my legs cramped and my ass was hurting after the 15 minute ride home. Some of that is most likely due to the seat, but after about a week of being back in the gym I haven’t cramped since. I was out riding the other day (ironically looking for a seat pad) and the entire time I was waiting for the discomfort to kick in and it didn’t happen once. So even though the control of the bike may be upper body, those lower body muscles are working just as much if not more than the upper body I would imagine.
As a matter of fact when I took the MSF course my legs were screaming. After I got home on the 1st riding day, they both had cramped up at the same time and struggled to get off the floor.
 

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It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye
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IMO while a sportbike rider who is really hanging it out may have a lot of muscular exertion, there just isn't much there for a cruiser rider if they're doing it right.
That soreness you may get after the first few rides is from holding riding position, it usually goes away once your body learns to cope.

For instance, I spend almost an hour a week working shoulders and another working back muscles, but when I get off my bike after the first couple of long rides in the spring my back and my shoulders ache.

Hell, my butt hurts if I sit in my recliner too long. I hardly think that's because of exertion.
 
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