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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

A bit of background as on my problem with deciding on a first bike.
I am 6' 5", 6'6" with shoes and even larger with a helmet on.
I currently weight 279 lbs but working on that (dropped 30 pounds to get here so far).

I am looking to buy my first bike.

The local HD dealer had a demo day and I went there and did 3 test runs, which were enough to convince me I will not be getting a Harley anytime soon. I can't afford the really nice ones and the cheaper ones seemed to punch my kidneys and cook me at the same time.

I then went to Moto Guzzi as they are attractive and reasonably priced by my aesthetics and wallet. The dealer didn't have batteries in them so I couldn't take a test ride.

I then stumbled upon a Triumph dealer and took two test rides on a T120 and it was love on first ride!
A picture with me on the bike has been uploaded and I was wondering if I seem too large on the bike. Also, are there similarly styled bikes out there that are physically larger than the T120 I could try out so I don't look like I stole my own bike?
Price range is below $12,000 and my use is short-distance commuting and weekend riding.
 

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If you like the bike who cares what anyone else thinks or what you like. Fit is very important on a motorcycle, so if you think it works for you, then it's worth considering. I'm sot sure there's anything out there that's taller and similarly styled to the Triumph, but some retro bikes that would be in a similar vein would be the Honda CB1100, the Kawasaki Z900RS and perhaps loosely, the Yamaha XSR900. I believe the Kawasaki and Yamaha are a couple inches taller than the Triumph, which may help. Indian Scout might be worth a look too.



Some taller riders gravitate towards adventure bikes like the Suzuki VStrom Honda, Africa Twin or KLR650 because they've got taller saddles, but I'm not sure that fits what you want.


I don't know which Guzzis you're considering, but having sat on the V7 and V9(fit me like a glove, but I'm 5'9"), I'm thinking they'll be more cramped for you. Because of the transverse engine configuration, I have heard some taller riders saying their knees sometimes hit the heads, but you should check it out for yourself. Good luck.
 

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Omgrem, welcome to the forum!:smile:

I am 6ft-5in tall and 350 lbs, so we share a similar problem when finding a bike that is ergonomically comfortable:sad:

Triumphs all seem a little cramped to me and I've had a new 2010 Scrambler and 2012 Rocket 3 Roadster.

Moto Guzzi's are typically small also, especially the V7's and V9's, remember that Italian's are small.

Goldwings and Harley Electra Glides are very comfortable to me and I've had several.

I find most of the 'Adventure bikes' to be very comfortable and believe me, I've had lots of them and currently I have a 2016 Suzuki DL 650 V-strom and love it.

My other bike is a 2014 Honda CTX1300D and it is very roomy and the V-4 FI engine is laudable.

Buy what feels good to you and don't compromise.

Sam:nerd:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, my problem with getting an adventure bike is paying for the premium without ever doing any adventuring.
I sat on the Triumph Tiger 800 and it was nice to sit on but it has more stuff that can break.
I was in the market for a Versys 650 initially but the styling on them is just not as nice when you go look at the Tigers, Super Duke Adventure or some of the other adv bikes out there.
And that Triumph felt great once I realized I was actually supposed to be leaning forward slightly when I accelerated on it:grin:

Omgrem, welcome to the forum!:smile:

I am 6ft-5in tall and 350 lbs, so we share a similar problem when finding a bike that is ergonomically comfortable:sad:

Triumphs all seem a little cramped to me and I've had a new 2010 Scrambler and 2012 Rocket 3 Roadster.

Moto Guzzi's are typically small also, especially the V7's and V9's, remember that Italian's are small.

Goldwings and Harley Electra Glides are very comfortable to me and I've had several.

I find most of the 'Adventure bikes' to be very comfortable and believe me, I've had lots of them and currently I have a 2016 Suzuki DL 650 V-strom and love it.

My other bike is a 2014 Honda CTX1300D and it is very roomy and the V-4 FI engine is laudable.

Buy what feels good to you and don't compromise.

Sam:nerd:
 

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Fit is one of those personal things. I actually sat one of those bikes when I was shopping for my current bike. To be fair, I want to emphasize -- I SAT on it, did not ride it, and a riding impression may well be different. The Triumph undoubtedly has a style and general air that appeal powerfully to me. But I don't think I'd be very happy with the little one. At almost 5-11 and currently down to 204 pounds. I felt just a bit cramped. You have the advantage over me of having ridden it, though, and what works for you, let no man question!

The final choice for me was a radically different-looking bike -- but not really too different under the skin. It's a 2017 Honda CBR300R. The power is more than sufficient for my riding style. The seating position is a whole lot more like the Triumph's than you'd think -- not identical but fairly upright, with the option of sliding butt back and chest down to tuck in behind the fairing. I can easily put both feet flat at a stop if I need to, assuming I place them with a bit of care to avoid the pegs. I have an acquaintance who is 6-5 and just last week bought a 2016 CBR300R. He reports it's comfortable for him! Even to me, it seems unlikely -- but again, to each his own.

Maybe best of all, a spanking-new one is around $5500 or so, a mighty "big little bike" for the money. Mine, with all of 292 miles on it, was considerably less -- like "less" enough to afford a quality helmet, 2 pairs (summer/winter) of riding gloves, boots, a good quality all-season armored textile jacket, leather chaps, a Class 3 reflective safety vest, a cigarette-lighter-and-USB-type power port to add on, a top-quality rear soft luggage rack, a magnetic tank bag, a nylon bike cover, a really nice seat cushion (believe me, go for more than an hour or two and you will crave one), and front and rear jack stands -- with change left over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wow, I never realized the CBR was that big!
I went on the ergofit website and looked at it and was surprised!
That could definitely be in my future. The only concern is, can I love that bike for 5 years or not...It's not the kind of bike I'd want to invest in you know?
Also, can that bike maintain 80 mph easily?

Fit is one of those personal things. I actually sat one of those bikes when I was shopping for my current bike. To be fair, I want to emphasize -- I SAT on it, did not ride it, and a riding impression may well be different. The Triumph undoubtedly has a style and general air that appeal powerfully to me. But I don't think I'd be very happy with the little one. At almost 5-11 and currently down to 204 pounds. I felt just a bit cramped. You have the advantage over me of having ridden it, though, and what works for you, let no man question!

The final choice for me was a radically different-looking bike -- but not really too different under the skin. It's a 2017 Honda CBR300R. The power is more than sufficient for my riding style. The seating position is a whole lot more like the Triumph's than you'd think -- not identical but fairly upright, with the option of sliding butt back and chest down to tuck in behind the fairing. I can easily put both feet flat at a stop if I need to, assuming I place them with a bit of care to avoid the pegs. I have an acquaintance who is 6-5 and just last week bought a 2016 CBR300R. He reports it's comfortable for him! Even to me, it seems unlikely -- but again, to each his own.

Maybe best of all, a spanking-new one is around $5500 or so, a mighty "big little bike" for the money. Mine, with all of 292 miles on it, was considerably less -- like "less" enough to afford a quality helmet, 2 pairs (summer/winter) of riding gloves, boots, a good quality all-season armored textile jacket, leather chaps, a Class 3 reflective safety vest, a cigarette-lighter-and-USB-type power port to add on, a top-quality rear soft luggage rack, a magnetic tank bag, a nylon bike cover, a really nice seat cushion (believe me, go for more than an hour or two and you will crave one), and front and rear jack stands -- with change left over.
 

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No it can't without complaint. The rpm's @ that speed would amaze and frighten you:surprise:

The speedometers are still 7 to 10% optimistic so that 80 mph ride is probably a little over 70.

You are a big guy so get something that will still excite you after a few months. Honda has a 500cc, twin, 6 speed, water cooled CBR500 that looks real sharp, almost identical to the 300 above and it wouldn't be beat to death at Interstate speeds AND it's selling for a bargain basement price.

Sam:grin:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for that!
Actually watching a video review on this very bike.
Dealer is 1 mile from my house so a test ride is in order!
No it can't without complaint. The rpm's @ that speed would amaze and frighten you:surprise:

The speedometers are still 7 to 10% optimistic so that 80 mph ride is probably a little over 70.

You are a big guy so get something that will still excite you after a few months. Honda has a 500cc, twin, 6 speed, water cooled CBR500 that looks real sharp, almost identical to the 300 above and it wouldn't be beat to death at Interstate speeds AND it's selling for a bargain basement price.

Sam:grin:
 

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That could definitely be in my future. The only concern is, can I love that bike for 5 years or not...It's not the kind of bike I'd want to invest in you know?
Also, can that bike maintain 80 mph easily?
If you want to do 80 on the Interstate all day long, it'll do it, I have no doubt. Will you WANT to ride it 80 all day long? That, I sincerely doubt. It'll be harder on you than on the bike.

My motorcycle cross-country travel strategy can be summed up with a description of a 220 mile round trip I took early this morning. Normally, I would go from my home to our family's mountain house by using I-26 for the last half of the journey. Today, I instead took the old 2-lane US 176. This passes through a number of small towns, and goes up the infamous Saluda Grade, a motorcycle road if there ever was one. In the old days before I-26, this route was torturous -- you spent a couple of hours grinding along behind all the 18-wheelers in the eastern US, bottlenecked like refrigerated toothpaste squeezing out of a tube. Today, the road is all but deserted. I encountered exactly 4 cars the whole way up and back on this stretch. And if you think this takes longer than the Interstate, you're right -- today the round trip took me all of 11 minutes more than it would have by car on I-26, a trip I have made 1000 times if I have made it once. A price I willingly pay to avoid dealing with the big stuff and complacent drivers on the Interstate!

If I HAD to do the Interstate thing for more than just the occasional 40-mile dash, I'd look up the scale to at least the CBR500.

BTW, I had heard the "speedo is 10% off " thing so many times that I hooked up the GPS and checked the speedometer against it. The speedo registers about 1 MPH fast at all tested speeds. In other words, if it reads 60, GPS says 61.
 

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"BTW, I had heard the "speedo is 10% off " thing so many times that I hooked up the GPS and checked the speedometer against it." Quote:grin:

The speedo thing being off is truth and is common knowledge.:surprise:

Go to Google and type in: Why are motorcycle speedometers so optimistic :smile_big:

Normal is between 7 and 10% but this can vary with different bikes.:wink2:

1 mph? Goodie goodie. It's the first 'stock' bike I've heard of in 56 years of riding and 85 bikes that is that accurate:surprise:

Sam:nerd:
 

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Get what feels right to you but buy used getting used to the feel of a bike, many, not all damage them, or others damage them for them. A good used older standard can be had very cheap in the next few months and you will have hundreds in it rather than thousands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Are you suggesting to get the bike now because winter is coming?
Because winter also affects me as a new rider in a more negative way.
I also live by some of the most distracted drivers of all time!
The plan was to shop hard, settle on a bike or two and then look for a deal on new old stock. I have seen price drops of $3000 already on a CBR650F at my dealer for example.
Get what feels right to you but buy used getting used to the feel of a bike, many, not all damage them, or others damage them for them. A good used older standard can be had very cheap in the next few months and you will have hundreds in it rather than thousands.
 

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Ban Hammer, Try Me.
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Are you suggesting to get the bike now because winter is coming?
Because winter also affects me as a new rider in a more negative way.
I also live by some of the most distracted drivers of all time!
The plan was to shop hard, settle on a bike or two and then look for a deal on new old stock. I have seen price drops of $3000 already on a CBR650F at my dealer for example.
I am suggesting waiting till winter at this point and def not to buy from a dealership. If it is your first bike buy used and from an individual as a preference. If you feel better buying from a dealer by all means do so.just know their mark up could be savings instead from a seller shedding their bike for the winter.
 

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"BTW, I had heard the "speedo is 10% off " thing so many times that I hooked up the GPS and checked the speedometer against it." Quote:grin:

The speedo thing being off is truth and is common knowledge.:surprise:

Go to Google and type in: Why are motorcycle speedometers so optimistic :smile_big:

Normal is between 7 and 10% but this can vary with different bikes.:wink2:

1 mph? Goodie goodie. It's the first 'stock' bike I've heard of in 56 years of riding and 85 bikes that is that accurate:surprise:

Sam:nerd:
Never said it wasn't well-known common knowledge. Said I checked mine and it was 1 MPH off. I suppose mine is the one and only accurate motorcycle speedometer on earth...:surprise:
 

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When mine says 70 it is actually doing 64,65,66 somewhere around that. There was an app I saw once that you can plug in tire size and it will figure out what difference in the speedo it will make. A lot of time people put bigger tires and get lucky and their speedo is more accurate.
 

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Hi Omgrem, welcome from Seattle :)

I am tall as well, not quite as tall as you (6'3") but height is still an issue for me on most bikes. I have a Triumph Scrambler and it is excellent for commuting. Something to consider, along with height, is whether or not the bike is good for what you want. The Triumph is simple and easy to ride. It's got great, usable power, not too much, and is very forgiving. Don't get me wrong, you can get down the road on it, but you won't find yourself "accidentally" doing 60 mph.

Most sport bikes over 600cc would be big enough as well. I had an SV650 as well as an FJ1200 in the past, and both were plenty tall enough.

Something I didn't catch from your post...are you a new rider? If so I would steer towards the Triumph over, say, a CBR600. Those bikes are awfully powerful. I would also buy used. Mine is a 2006, I got it for under $5000. It's super nice still, but if I drop it, I'm not dropping a $12,000 bike. Depending where you are, Bonnevilles can be had regularly in the $3000 to $5000 range all day long.
 

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See if this site has your bike you're interested in or nearly one. They seem to be dated but it might show you what you might look like once you fill in the blanks.
 

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With the new electronic monitoring/control modules on everything now days speedos are more accurate. I have a tuner program for my little car. Along with engine adjustments I can input tire size, gear ratios and other data that can correct the indicated speed.
 
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