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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #1
When I go home from work today, I'm going to see if I can figure out why the bike wouldn't start at Lunch time today.

Since I had some (abeit weak) electrical response, and I have gas, I'm tempted to leave the bike on the Battery Tender and attempt to start it.

"Is it ill advised to" attempt to start the bike with the Battery Tender connected?
I'm thinking it might help wilth draw, if the battery is just plain shot.

Your thoughts?

I've been very fastidious about putting the Battery on the Tender whenever I'm not riding the bike, so I'm a bit surprised that it wouldn't start today. About the only thing I've had happen with that bike in the past, was the Negative cable on the battery came loose enough once, to have no response at all. But in THIS case, I had weak response.

-soupy
 

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It wouldn't hurt to check the connections again. Check for voltage at the battery. You may need to do a load test if everything else checks out fine.

I don't think there will be any benefit from plugging the tender in while starting.
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I'm thinking I might send an overload to the Tender when the bike actually starts, is my concern.

Don't want to blow the Tender.

More logically though........I'm figuring it is POSSIBLE that the Electrolytes have evaporated off, and I'll need to either add more, or just buy a new Battery.

Which says something about using a Battery Tender.........in that it WORKS, but there is the possibility that (unless it is a "sealed battery" and I just don't recall) I could be accelerating the demise of the battery, from any heat during trickle, forcing evaporation.


-Soupy
 

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American Legion Rider
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A battery can just go bad too. It can work one time and the next...nothing. I'd certainly check your connections though first. If the battery has gone, you can leave your tender on forever and it won't help. If you don't find a loose connection then you'll have to have it load tested. How old is it? If it's more than 4 years I think I'd just replace it.
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #5
At Lunchtime, when I couldn't get it to start, I rolled it back into the garage, and put it back on the Battery Tender.

Came home from work, unplugged the Tender, turned the key and hit the Ignition Switch, and the damn thing fired right up. No lag, no hesitation, .......just fired up like always!!

Go figure?!?!

The Battery is 3 years old.

-soupy
 

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battery

So disconnect battery overnight to make sure nothing on the bike is drawing power from it. It should put out 12.6 volts in the morning if in good shape after its rest away from the tender.

Motorcycle batteries generally do not last like car batteries,so 3 years might be getting a little long in the tooth.....
 

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Three years old is right at the border line for replacement Soupy. Yes, some batteries go for what seems like forever, but three to five years is average.

A new battery is small insurance against waiting on the side of the road for a ride.

Personally, I change my batteries in ALL my vehicles every four or five years.
 

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Pale Rider
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528 Posts
Better yet, install either a Voltmeter, or a Battery Monitor on your bike: you can monitor the entire charging system by periodically checking the voltage readings: above 14 Volts (anything above 15 Volts indicates the Voltage Regulator is failing, and it is damaging your battery...) when running indicates the charging system is working, and charging your battery; 12.4 Volts (flooded), or 12.6 Volts (AGM), prior to starting, indicates the battery is fully charged.

Also, any smart trickle charger can go bad... I had to replace mine recently, as it was trickle charging my known-good, AGM battery, at 15+ Volts! I disconnected it, and I replaced it, immediately. My battery is still working, so I hope I saved it before any real damage was done.

In a flooded battery, if the electrolyte is low for longer than a few days, it likely will sulfate the plates, and then it needs to be replaced. I abandoned flooded motorcycle batteries a few years ago, after never getting more than two years from any brand, in three different bikes, which were all connected to a properly working Battery Tender Jr. after every ride.

Get a Voltmeter/Battery Monitor. They have saved me from being stranded twice, on two different bikes, so far, by warning me of a failure, before the bike died; they also warned me of a battery problem prior to a ride -- it would have stranded my wife and I who-knows-where, miles from home. While it killed the day trip before it started, I fixed the problem, and it's been fine since last year (loose connection on the battery: started, but would not charge). Cheers!
:coffee:
 
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