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Discussion Starter #1
In a discussion with the ex yesterday, she was asking about my bike. She spoke in a way that implied getting injured or killed in a wreck is inevitable. To be fair, she's an ER doc, so she has to deal with the consequences frequently and probably has a skewed perception of motorcyclists.

Anyway, it made me wonder what percentage of us have been involved in a serious incident that resulted in bodily injury and/or significant damage to the bike. So, here's what I found.

According to the Insurance Information Institute, 2013 saw 4,668 fatalities and 88,000 injuries from roughly 8.4 million motorcycles on US roads. According to my sketchy math skills, that's a little over 1 percent.

By comparison, there were 35,244 fatalities from car wrecks in 2013. A little more math and we learn there were 96.58 car deaths every day while there are only 12.78 deaths from motorcycles every day.

Looking at all of this make me think percentage-wise, the ex has a point. From a daily statistics viewpoint, I'll take my bike over the car, which is 7.55 times more likely to get me killed.

One last point, motorcycle fatalities were down 6.4 percent in 2013 from 2012. Injuries were also down 5.4 in the same period. Apparently, we're getting better at watching out for all those cagers who are crashing more frequently over the last five years. :biggrin:
 

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In a discussion with the ex yesterday, she was asking about my bike. She spoke in a way that implied getting injured or killed in a wreck is inevitable. To be fair, she's an ER doc, so she has to deal with the consequences frequently and probably has a skewed perception of motorcyclists.

Anyway, it made me wonder what percentage of us have been involved in a serious incident that resulted in bodily injury and/or significant damage to the bike. So, here's what I found.

According to the Insurance Information Institute, 2013 saw 4,668 fatalities and 88,000 injuries from roughly 8.4 million motorcycles on US roads. According to my sketchy math skills, that's a little over 1 percent.

By comparison, there were 35,244 fatalities from car wrecks in 2013. A little more math and we learn there were 96.58 car deaths every day while there are only 12.78 deaths from motorcycles every day.

Looking at all of this make me think percentage-wise, the ex has a point. From a daily statistics viewpoint, I'll take my bike over the car, which is 7.55 times more likely to get me killed.


One last point, motorcycle fatalities were down 6.4 percent in 2013 from 2012. Injuries were also down 5.4 in the same period. Apparently, we're getting better at watching out for all those cagers who are crashing more frequently over the last five years. :biggrin:
Well, isn't %age-wise the whole pt (and the best way of comparison)? I'm sure that there are way more cagers than bikers so that slightly over 1% injury/death rate for riders is not very assuring.
 

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If you want to cut your odds of death by 25% get a license

Which leads to the question, of the other 75% how many had a license for under 5-4-3-2-1 yrs........experience not included in insurance stats(wonder why).......I'd bet it has something to do with keeping rates high on the more experienced rider.

hmmm they always use the type of area you live in, large city, minor city, small town, out in the county........but that kind of information is withheld in the insurance stats......wonder why

Did notice, 3-6pm weekdays is when most motorcyclist are killed....kinda sounds like city life.

And of course one stat they will never reveal is how many motorcycle crashes are due to someone in a 4 or more wheeled vehicle doing something stupid.

Remember stats are produced by people wanting to show something in particular, data that does not meet their intended purpose is rejected, stats that could be used against them will not be published.......insurance companies want reasons to keep rates high for everybody everywhere.
 

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I agree with the other poster who said there are far many more cars on the road than bikes!

In order to be truly meaningful, you'd next to get the number of injuries and fatalities per miles travelled.

The federal government estimates that motorcyclists are 26 times more likely to die in an accident than those driving a car - per same distance travelled. Same distance travelled is the key.

Another interesting stat: approximately 40% of motorcycle fatalities are single vehicle wrecks. So if you don't kill yourself, your odds get 40% better! On second thought, now I wonder how many of those were run off the road or into an obstacle trying to avoid a cager who screwed up?
 

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http://961theeagle.com/what-is-the-safest-way-to-travel-by-plane-car-train-space-shuttle/

^Motorcycles were tops as the most dangerous way to get around by the mile. The next two, walking or cycling, gave about 3x better odds of survival.

Motorcycles average one death per 800,000 miles, which is hellapoor odds. If you are a hard core biker, say 10,000 miles a year for 40 years, then it's a coin flip.

You can rationalize or sugar coat, but those are not good odds. I have to believe that a few smart choices: not drinking and riding, wearing a helmet, staying under the speed limit, good maintenance, etc. could bring your chances up dramatically.

But, even if you end up with double or triple the average chances, the odds still suck.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replies, folks. There are so many ways to look at the plethora of stats that it is absolutely dizzying.

One conclusion I draw from all of the stats is that I'm not buying any of it. As anybike points out, the stats are put together for purposes other than to inform riders.

I don't think the odds are against us and will eventually catch up to us. It largely depends on our own behavior, awareness, experience and other factors. Let's face it, the 40% rje58 references are mostly rider error (maybe a small percentage are equipment failure) that could have been prevented.
 

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Not trying to derail or hijack your thread, but.... I had to take a driver's ed class recently. Online. State of California.

One stat that REALLY stood out to me was some 30+% of accidents happened to the first car in line when the light turned green.

In other words, an increasing # of red-light runners wiping out guys like me who are always jockeying to be at the front of the line.

This is one of the FEW stats where your behavior can change YOUR risk. Look both ways. Let the guy in the other lane pull out first. Hesitate before going.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, isn't %age-wise the whole pt (and the best way of comparison)? I'm sure that there are way more cagers than bikers so that slightly over 1% injury/death rate for riders is not very assuring.
I don't think percentages are the key. Those are the numbers after the fact. Recent trends show those numbers are going down. They spiked in the mid 2000s, but have been about 20% lower year over year since 2008. Car deaths had the same spike trend in the same years for some reason.

As far as numbers of cars vs motorcycles, it was 253 million cars vs 8.4 million motorcycles in 2013.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
One stat that REALLY stood out to me was some 30+% of accidents happened to the first car in line when the light turned green.

In other words, an increasing # of red-light runners wiping out guys like me who are always jockeying to be at the front of the line.

This is one of the FEW stats where your behavior can change YOUR risk. Look both ways. Let the guy in the other lane pull out first. Hesitate before going.

Cheers!
Makes perfect sense. I've heard about that problem before, but hadn't seen numbers.

I always look twice when I'm get a green light before I take off on the bike. In the cage it's one look and blast off.
 
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