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Discussion Starter #1
The other day when filling up at a local gas station, an older guy about my own age pulled in with what appeared to be a "standard" style motorcycle that I had not seen before. Turns out it was a Honda 700N, the model with an "automatic" transmission. Turns out the rider traded in his old Goldwing for this much, much smaller bike and was as happy as could be (of course most folks are really happy when they get any new bike!). He said the bike had enough power to beat out cars from stop lights, as well as to cruise on the highways, and that the lower weight as compared to his old Goldwing made riding a true pleasure, especially at low speeds. He said that what prompted getting this particular bike was that he was having some pain in his hands, and not having to pull in a clutch lever made riding much more comfortable to him. I'll admit it got me thinking as the arthritis in my hands is certainly getting worse.

I don't think I'm quite ready to give up by large bagger with its comfortable ride and power for a much lighter and smaller bike, but maybe as a second bike it would really make sense. I think you could add a small windscreen and some saddle bags and have a pretty versatle mid sized motorcycle.
 

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Pale Rider
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My wife and I circled Lake Superior, in 2009, on a 30-year-old Honda 750, riding two-up. We never had any power-related issues -- bike ran flawlessly, even though it was heavily loaded with full saddlebags, trunk, and tank bag. Back in the 70's, people routinely toured, two up, on 700-800 cc's, without issues.

I will admit, though, that we bought a Kawi Voyager XII full touring bike, in 2010, and that is all we own, and ride, since 2012. We wouldn't go back due to lack of room and comfort, not power. YMMV. Cheers!
:coffee:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My Triumph Thunderbird, with the accessories I have put on it, is much better for touring than a small Honda. But realistically, I must admit that I don't tour very often. Most of my riding is a one hour afternoon ride, or even an all day summer ride (like two or three hours to a lunch destination, then two or three hours home). Having a somewhat smaller bike would not be that serious a deal for me. On the other hand, when I had a Triumph America, the "little" 865cc engine always seemed to be working so hard when we rode two-up on the highway that it tired me out. Riding a big engine bike where I can maintain 75mph at less than 3,000 quiet RPM's is a nice way to travel! Its the auto trans that has me intrigued now that my hands are giving me so much pain. Years ago I had a Honda Silverwing (mega scooter) and the auto trans did not detract at all from the pleasure of the ride.
 

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Troublemaker
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We were thinking of getting a couple of the N automatics for work bikes. They ride really light and the power for one person is enough for anything we old folks do. I would rather ride something like that when I get older than a trike. My mind just can't comprehend a trike yet, but if that was the only way to ride, I'm sure my mind could be changed.
 

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American Legion Rider
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vito, the Spyder we got was done for just what you are talking about. When I can't ride the big hog. That Spyder has the semi-automatic. What very little I did get to ride said it's the right direction for me.
 

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Charlie Tango Xray
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Vito, I bought a Honda CTX700N (standard transmission) as a "second bike" for my gorgeous two year old Vulcan Nomad 1700. I wound up putting hardbags on the CTX and selling the Nomad to a riding buddy a few months later. I don't miss the extra weight in the least and couldn't be happier. That CTX is a blast to ride. If I do chose to drive something heavy I'll hop in the other set of acronyms in our garage, my wife's CTS-V. :biggrin:
 

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Vito, ride one of the automatics before you get to crazy about it. I've ridden one and at slow speed and in town it was a pain. And if the trans wasn't well warmed it wouldn't even really want to move below 3000 RPM.
Before someone asks, yes, it was in good repair, not abused or worn out. Maybe they've made some improvements since I think it was a 2009.
 

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Challenged Mechanic
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I believe the new Hondas use DCT (dual clutch transmission) and internally they work similarly to a standard tranny.Not sure how long they've been using this type. I've heard good things about these new DCTs. It might be worth a test ride. I still don't think I am sold on them, but you never know until you try. They won't be anything like the old Honda automatics" that's for sure.

Cheers,

Mike
 

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MODERATOR
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The 700cc, verticle twin Honda's are fantastic bikes, very reliable and get exceptional gas mileage, reported to be between 60 to 75 mpg:biggrin:

It's weird but most of you guys that have posted above me here have bikes that I just love: The Triumph Thunderbird, the Vulcan Nomad 1700 and the Triumph Explorer and that CTX700N is also cool;)

Apparently we all have good tastes:biggrin:

I came close to buying a 2012 Vaquero 1700 and a 2010 Thunderbird not long ago and just today, I priced out a new Triumph Explorer. I have thought many times about the fun I'd have on the 700 with the DCT auto-trans!

So many bikes so much fantasy!

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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Pegasus trapped in a human body on a motorcycle
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LW, Did the DN-01 use a similar tranny, or was it one of them CVT jobs?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My Silverwing scooter had a CVT transmission, and there was some obvious delay when turning the throttle from a dead stop, or even when trying to quickly accelerate from a low speed. But it was never more than just slightly annoying. I never found myself in any danger because of it, and even with this delay in the CVT I could still out accelerate most cars from a full stop.

But that aside, I would never likely buy a bike without taking a demo ride first. I think that the Kawasaki Concours that I bought new in 1997 was the only bike I bought just from magazine reviews and sitting on it at the dealership.
 

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American Legion Rider
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High rpm's is key even on the lowly Spyder.
 

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Pegasus trapped in a human body on a motorcycle
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I was thinking a CVT powerplant would be a good ultralight helicopter engine to use...
 

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My Silverwing scooter had a CVT transmission, and there was some obvious delay when turning the throttle from a dead stop, or even when trying to quickly accelerate from a low speed. But it was never more than just slightly annoying. I never found myself in any danger because of it, and even with this delay in the CVT I could still out accelerate most cars from a full stop.

But that aside, I would never likely buy a bike without taking a demo ride first. I think that the Kawasaki Concours that I bought new in 1997 was the only bike I bought just from magazine reviews and sitting on it at the dealership.
Vito, what you're describing is exactly what I experienced, but maybe because the one I rode was a goldwing and very heavy it really felt dangerous at low speed. I suppose you could get use to it and learn the nuances, but since it was a trade in bike at the shop I was working with, I only got to put a couple hundred miles on it.
 

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The 700cc, verticle twin Honda's are fantastic bikes, very reliable and get exceptional gas mileage, reported to be between 60 to 75 mpg:biggrin:

It's weird but most of you guys that have posted above me here have bikes that I just love: The Triumph Thunderbird, the Vulcan Nomad 1700 and the Triumph Explorer and that CTX700N is also cool;)

Apparently we all have good tastes:biggrin:



Sam:coffeescreen:
Thanks Porky!
 

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I'm there, almost. I sold my beloved Suzuki GS850G (still the most beautiful motorcycle ever, I say) because I'm old and getting clumsier. And the drivers here in Dogpatch are psychopaths.

But if I ran into a nice GS650G, I would really be in trouble....

Sog
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I know I am old, but I'm not the oldest rider! Seriously, at 72 I feel I am likely older than most who ride, but I have run into folks well into their 80's still riding. I've run in far more who quit riding in their 50's or 60's because they thought they were "too old to ride". So there might not be too many oldsters on the road, but there are some.

I've told this story before on this forum but I'll repeat it here. Back in 1991 when I was just a young rider of 48, I was at a Rider Magazine sponsored rally in Ohio and met a rider who had come solo from southern CA and was heading to Boston for his granddaughter's wedding. He was riding an old BMW and was at the time 85. I remember thinking that his guy is my personal hero, and my hope was that if and when I reach that age I will still enjoy traveling on two wheels. That guy is not likely still on this earth (he would be 109 now) but for me, I hope to have another 13 years or so riding. I'm sure if I make it that far it will not be on my current ride, a 2013 Triumph Thunderbird, but more likely would be a smaller bike or even, if need be, a three wheeler.
 

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I've been riding my NC700X 6 speed manual since February. Great bike on all roads.
 
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