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Discussion Starter #1
So, I've really been wanting a motorcycle for a while now and have finally taken all of the steps in order to get one (went to msf, raised enough money for a decent bike, got permit, ect) but now I'm scared to get one because of fear of getting into an accident. I actually did not start feeling this way until last week when my neighbor told me a horrific story of what happened to her dad (a women cut him off at an intersection, he had to slam on his breaks, which caused him to be thrown off the bike and lose feeling in legs).

I obviously don't want to give up, as I had so much fun when riding at MSF course, but that story really did scare me.
 

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Find someone to ride with, someone experienced and safe and mature, and master your own neighborhood. Best way to learn is to follow a good leader.
 

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The 43rd Poser
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I agree.

I'm not going to tell you to ride, and I'm not going to tell you NOT to ride...

But if you want, I can tell you some horrific stories from people paralyzed and killed in cars.... I ran the jaws of life for 9 years.

My point?

Any one of us could die at any time, any where, with or without a motorcycle or automobile.

Don't let stories keep you from what you want to do.

Be smart, be safe, learn to control your ride, and pretend they can't see you.
 

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I won't ride a roller coaster, and I will not ever willing touch a snake. :p

Everything is not for everyone.

These guys made some good suggestions. Give it a go if you like, but it may not be for you. There is nothing wrong with that.

It is a fact people die in motorcycle crashes.

It is also a fact that people die at home in bed.

My father died at age 50, my grandfather at age 37.
As far as I know neither had ever been on a motorcycle.
 

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Well. Having a bit of fear is a good thing. Keeps you vigilant. Too much fear will make you over cautious, which could be just as bad as being reckless.

I know someone who died rolling out of bed one morning. My point, we are all going to die sometime, somehow, somewhere. I've accepted the fact that I may die on my bike. But I'd be happier dying on my bike than dying from cancer.

You either have to accept the risks or walk away. Don't let anyone but yourself to convince you otherwise.
 

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It is a personal challenge for you and a choice only you can make.
My first ever bike was a 125cc 2 stroke back in the late 60s. I had a commute of maybe 6 miles in city traffic to get to work. As soon as I got that bike I started using it for my commute. Back in those days there was no such thing as training for a bike license so my total instruction was the salesman showing me how to shift the bike in the dealer's parking lot. About my third or fourth day commuting I had a car change lanes into the space I was riding in. I noticed it was happening and saw that a shopping center entrance was close by on my right. I chose to take that driveway and ride on the sidewalk rather than argue with the car. Even with zero experience and zero training I regained control of the bike and carefully got back onto the road at the next entry driveway.
The point to this is simple. Your fears are not unfounded. There are very real hazards out there. The choice you need to make is to give in to those fears or go out and enjoy the ride. I chose to continue riding but it is a very personal choice for each rider to make. None of us can make that choice for you.
 

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My father was one of those that took a lot of cajoling and pleading to allow me to get my first dirt bike, he tried it and had fun riding it on our farm. While he didn't get one himself or ride again, over twenty years later he got a Honda four wheeler of his own to ride around with his dog in a box on the back( a Beagle I gave him for fathers day). To make a long story short he died of a heart attack several years later at work. If you want to ride then ride, as others have said a little fear will keep you looking around, just don't let it paralyze you.
 

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Female Rider
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My husband and I both ride. We love touring on our bike and have been doing so since 2007. I don't see us giving it up anytime soon.

My brother in law also bought a bike and rode for a few years but only locally in about a 200 mile radius. He has now decided it was too dangerous as his reflexes are getting slower. He is trying to tell us it is too dangerous for us also and we should quit riding.

We realize there are dangers but enjoy riding too much to quit. As said, I would rather die riding than being killed in a car. Stats say I am more likely to be killed in a car than on a bike.

If you decide you do want to ride start slow and conquer the small things first. Do keep the thought in mind that something could happen and learn to be very vigilant about learning to look for possible dangers and escape routes.

Good Luck to you!!!
 

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Be careful.

As an insurance agent I am familiar with the " Probability of an insured event happening " Scare stories are not a factor.

The motto of the Ontario Provincial Police is " Caution and care will get you there "

Folks will glorify a story for the sake of telling a story. Unfortunately some folks die too soon from a variety of reasons, including bike crashes. But if you have any sense of self preservation, and are careful, you should be fine.
Expect cages to pull out in front of you. They do it to me often.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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Save them all!
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Funny how the moment some people find out you ride a motorcycle, they feel compelled to share the goriest story they know about someone who died riding one... regardless of the circumstances around it.

Most of the risk surrounding riding you can control just with good riding sense.. some you have less influence over, but like Crusty said if you have a sense of self-preservation you'll be fine.
 

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American Legion Rider
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I think you just need to put everything in perspective. You can walk out your front door and be killed in this world. But what's the real chance of that. Well better than it should be that's beside the point. But really I tell noobs to ride like EVERYONE IS TRYING TO KILL YOU. You have to ride in total defense mode.

At first you will be paranoid but that will go away slowly as you gain confidence in your own abilities. Parking lot practice until you are sick of it will help a lot. What's going to get you there? Just you. You'll be fine but it you have any friends that aren't crazy that ride, they can sorta guard you while you learn to deal with traffic.

This is a case where I like the European way of Licensing with a big LEARNER plate. Or whatever the words are that signify you are a noobi.
 

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NOOBI would make a great custom plate. I wonder if it's taken...

Edit: Hah! There's a four letter limit, but NOOB isn't taken in my state.:biggrin:
 

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American Legion Rider
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I just check the Texas site and it is. For now anyway.

 

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Well made points here,you WILL die at some point.You can either be paranoid about it and be miserable or accept it and go live life to the fullest with the time you have.Not telling you to ride,that is your option but on the other hand you could die of a heart attack next week and that's enough time to get in a lot of miles on a bike:)
 
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