Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
okay, so just bought myself a 1986 honda CR125R for 500 dollars. ( impulse buy) previous owner claims to have done enduro on it. but the bike wont idle unless i pin the throttle at 1/10th... so i digress. the bike itself looks to be in reasonable condition ( for being 30 years old) and heres why im here guys...
ive never owned a 2 stroke bike before, i know my way around a 4 stroke more or less, but upon first ride of the bike i noticed it has little in common with 4 strokes power and maintenance wise. when i got it the previous owner explained that it wasnt idling because " 2 strokes dont idle" ( ive come to realize this is a hot topic on the interwebs, many agree and disagree) this being the reason for him to remove the kill switch all together, i dont know much but i know letting it stall out isnt the norm. he had also neglected to tell me it hadnt any trans fluid in it, so i spoke to a clerk at canadian tire and he handed me some motomaster transmission fluid, so i filled it, then ran it till it was out of the old gas, ( i couldnt tell you how old exactly) and put in a 32-1 mixure. ive done what little research i can but my questions are left unanswered and on the odd occasion i get an answer, i fail to understand the terminology used. ex: "spooge" " getting it in/on the pipe". ill be completely honest, my searches are turning up alot of mixed answers, im about ready to call it quits and just learn the bike from mistakes i make along the way, itd be greatly appreciated if i could get a crash course in 2 stroke riding and maintenance, i feel like im worrying about little things that are just normal for a 2 stroke. any input would be great!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I have owned 2 strokes and they idled just fine. They are simple machines with few moving parts when compared to a 4 stroke. You should be able to adjust the idle on the carb.
As to maintaining it, I would use ethanol free gas and high quality 2 stroke oil like castrol. Mix it in a jerrycan and turn it a few times to make sure the mixture is even after it has sat.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Ace Tuner
Joined
·
2,584 Posts
Like Euro said, 2 strokes should be able to idle. I KNOW the CR125 should and did in its day.
I would guess the carburetor needs maintenance assuming the engine is sound.

"Getting it on the pipe" just means you are running at the RPM where the engine makes most of its power. It's a slang term we use.
The "pipe" (expansion chamber) is designed to work best at a certain RPM range as is the cylinder porting.
When you are at that RPM you are said to be on the pipe.

When that bike is running right, it can 'loop you' in a hurry! Watch out.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,168 Posts
Welcome to the forum.
First things first on an air cooled 2-stroke. There are 2 kinds of 2 stroke oil. One is for things like an outboard motor that gets really good cooling by having water circulate through it. The other is for lawn mowers, chain saws and 2 stroke bikes that get less than perfect cooling by an air cooling system. Be sure to use the right oil type. No, I don't want to recommend a brand and please don't turn this into an oil thread folks.
As far as idling, any 2 stroke I have ever owned idled just fine including several motorcycles from the 1970s, a couple of chain saws and a pole pruner. Chains saws are not designed to run at part throttle. They have 2 speeds, idle and wide open. Bikes have a bit more sophisticated carburetor and can run at any power level.
Recognize that a lot of the engine's cooling and all of its lubrication comes from your fuel mix. By the 1980s many 2 strokes were using 40:1 mixes but read the owner's manual if you have one.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top