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I've always been enamored with cruisers. (not necessarily any particular makes or models just that cruiser style) I've rarely ridden or spent the time to learn about motorcycles but am now in a position to buy one. After checking the forums and youtube videos the consensus is that cruisers are just too heavy and large for a very inexperienced rider like myself. however im 6'5', about 275. im a really big/strong dude. does that change anything? i just want to be comfortable and wont be going too fast to begin with. Do you experts have any ideas on what would be a good starter? (for my size and experience) im searching the used market in the 5-7k range, i have a guy who i can trust to test ride and do a precheck for me. please help me into this community!


appreciated!
 

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Welcome to the forum. There are big cruisers and small cruisers and in-between size cruisers, they're not all big and heavy. You say you have rarely ridden. When you have a little bit more experience you will learn what all motorcyclists learn: the weight of the bike doesn't really matter once you're going 15 mph or faster. It's only in the slow speed maneuvers that the weight matters, and especially how high up the center of gravity is. This is important when you're in a parking lot, going in and out of your driveway and garage, when you're doing low speed cornering in tight intersections, etc. Think about sitting at a traffic light, waiting to turn right at an intersection that's sharper than 90 degrees, and there's a pot hole right where you want to go. Weight will be a huge factor right about then.

You've got to have something big enough to fit you, but light enough that you can learn how to do the low speed maneuvers. Many people would advise you to buy an inexpensive used bike to start with since you'll drop it at least once while you're learning. Learn, get comfortable with it, figure out what you like and don't like, and then use that knowledge to buy what you really want.

And most important of all: get some training. With the Covid-19 shut down you might have to wait for a couple of months, but it will be tremendously helpful to you.
 

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Welcome to a great forum from SW Missouri.

Most cruisers have a low center of gravity so once moving, they are quite easy to handle. You are a big Guy so don't be talked into some little toy cruiser because you will out grow it very quickly.

I most always recommend the Suzuki Velousia-C50, 800cc, FI, shaft driven and totally proven and reliable bike to my friends and in fact a Friend that I met on this forum and have been mentoring, just bought his first bike, a very nice touring model C50, a few weeks ago that he and I checked out together. The price he paid for a fully dressed bike was amazing and he is VERY happy. Both myself and my Cousin had brand new Velousia's and they were fantastic cruisers, even for very experienced rider's like he and I.

Honda has some great 750cc cruisers also and both brands can be found on Craigslist and Cycletrader in abundance and at very good prices.

Hope this helps!
61314


Sam
 
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When this Covid thing lifts, get a bit of formal training -- MSF course as a minimum for many jurisdictions anyway... most of the basic mystery will have gone away by then. As stated above cruiser are generally non-threatening; relatively high on torque and low on center of gravity -- the possibilities are huge, but I see little reason for a cruiser under say 750cc and around 900cc might be a better minimum.

As fer buying used, sure -- not because you'll drop a new bike (or any bike -- my first get-off was well after 10K miles or so, and a few experienced riders assert they have never dropped a bike), but because you can get great value. I do like shafts, or belts if they can be changes without disassembling the drive-train, but for as first bike anything makes sense -- I think one learns more about maintaining the bike at first, once the basic hand/eye riding coordination is mastered and there is nothing wrong with a chain -- but do look at bikes that have a reputation for hardiness.

Bedstaluck -- stay healthy
 

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Some of the adventure or dual sport bikes would work as well. BTW...
WELCOME ON BOARD, and...

We are friendly site here. Well, most of us?
 
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At your size a cruiser in the 800 size range wouldn't be overly heavy or cumbersome..for the record my 150 pound daughter learned to ride and was on the streets with us in 1 day on an 800 Suzuki Marauder that we had sitting around with no problems. The brand doesn't matter, they all work fine as a first bike. You MIGHT be able to move up to an 1100 sized cruiser too, some of those are pretty laid back too and the weight isn't all that much different.... see which ones fit you well and since you have a friend who can test ride it get his opinion too.
 
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I am always hesitant to offer advice on the "best" bike of any type. What's best for me may be all wrong for you. But, as already mentioned, cruiser-style bikes come in all sizes. My first was a little Kawasaki 250 -- under 300 lbs., powerful enough for two-lane highways and an occasional short foray on an Interstate, and a great absolute-beginner bike. Nowadays my cruiser is a bit bigger -- 805 cc, 587 lb. Suzuki Boulevard C50, small by some standards but I find it big enough for me (5'11", 210), and plenty powerful for solo riding even on long highway trips. As also already mentioned, the Suzukis are a well-proven design, very reliable , low-maintenance and moderately priced. My well-equipped-and-maintained C50, an '08 that had 13K miles when I got it, set me back only $2750 -- a great bargain in a very capable cruiser bike. Left me plenty of $$ to add on a few niceties and make it "my" bike, a process that is still ongoing.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I appreciate everyones advice! you all seem to be very knowledgeable and honest. once this whole covid-19 thing dies down im going to get into an MSF course and go from there! I really do appreciate all the help in my decision process!!

thanks again!
 

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You are very welcome and GOD bless!
Sam
 
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After successfully passing the MSF course on August 2019 I got my Motorcycle endorsement License. My ultimate goal has always been to ride a touring bike, however as a new rider it is impractical to go out and buy a touring bike without priming on the road with an entry level bike. So I went with what it is defined as an entry level cruiser, Yamaha VStar 650. I'm a towering 5'7" 145lbs 30 inseam dude. The 650 classic cruiser is around 590 lbs., wet weight or running weight. I have to admit that when I first got the bike I was intimidated by the size and weight, I bought the bike last November 2019. In order to build my confidence level with the bike and on the road as a new rider, I decided to go on weekends to an empty parking lot and practice slow speeds weaving in and out of cones.

Anyone can ride a bike in a straight line at 30 MPH or more, but that does not necessarily mean you have total control of the bike. Having control of the bike means riding the bike at speeds of no more than 8MPH dragging the rear brake using the friction zone. This technique is going to come in handy, as stated above, in parking lots, heavy city traffic, getting in and out of a drive way.
I'm so glad I did that, because now the VStar feels like a bicycle, even at slow speeds in parking lots and city traffic. I've seen females, 125 lbs., riding Harleys in parking lots like if they're bicycles.
As my riding progresses I'm outgrowing the bike to the point that when the time is right, after this coronavirus, I will start looking for a touring bike.

Hope this helps.
 

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I appreciate everyones advice! you all seem to be very knowledgeable and honest. once this whole covid-19 thing dies down im going to get into an MSF course and go from there! I really do appreciate all the help in my decision process!!

thanks again!
That's great!! Loved all the suggestions (especially the ones for more rider training) and that you are excited to get out and ride. Welcome to the addiction :)
 

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I'm late to the conversation (as usual) but the above recommendations about taking the safety course is spot on. Invaluable actually. I've ridden on and off for 30 years. 8 years ago I got the itch after having not ridden for 10 years. I bought a Kawasaki Vulcan 750. Not the best choice because it sits high and I was unstable. Anyway I tried taking the exam after practicing for a couple of weeks. They kicked me off the course halfway through. I signed up for the safety course participating with a number of people that had never ridden before. One guy out of about 20 was eliminated because he fell over doing a tight figure eight maneuver. Everyone else aced it and got their license. I practice tools I learned every time I ride. When I screw up and have a close call, I practice more. The Vulcan is gone and I ride a Yamaha Raider now with a Suzuki 1500 in between the two. Best wishes!
 

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Like Porky mentioned the 800 Suzuki intruder is an amazing and very reliable motorcycle. I own one I've had for years and very very few mechanical problems from it.
 
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