Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I couldn't get into a course until September. So, in the meantime, I took the advice of some of the members here and looked for a dirt bike to practice in my yard.
I had been looking for a lONG time and I don't have a lot of money. I found one without a title but I looked the owner up and decided, it should be okay. I could not go in person, os my father, who knows less about motorcycles than I do, and, evidently, has NO common sense whatsoever, went to pick it up. I wasn't there to run the VIN myself. HOWEVER, had I been there, I NEVER would have bought it. It was supposed to be a like new 2018 crf125 bush wheel. My father somehow did not notice that it was filthy, the chain is rusty, the whole thing looks beat. All the rubber parts ar rotting, and best of all, IT DOES NOT START! I spent over $1600, including van rental and am stuck with this piece of junk that I probably can't sell and will probably cost more to fix than it's worth!

That's 1600 I cold have pout toward an actual motorcycle. I am partly to blame BUT I had the opportunity to have a very reasonably priced, low mileage, newer street bike, that I saw in person and was a good entry level motorcycle but my parents freaked when they saw it. It was a 2018 Rebel with ABS but my parents thought it was too big and heavy and I'd get injured somehow. I tried explaining that it's a beginner bike but, although I am more than old enough to make my own decisions, I listened to them and opted, instead for this piece of sh__ that I flushed my money down the toilet on!

I am so infuriated! I'm such an idiot!
 

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
4,601 Posts
Sorry 'bout your luck pardner, you took a beating for sure, and all your fault. I would never entrust something of such value to someone who knows even less about it than you. Not a bright move. Now you'll have to withstand the financial hit. Taking advice for those who know nothing will usually get you in trouble. The best advice I can give you is to not give you advice. You'll figure it out...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have certain restrictions, due to certain health issues, that prohibit traveling over certain distances. There was nothing in my immediate area for sale and I was unable to travel as far as I would have needed to get this bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
607 Posts
It's a hard lesson to learn, but the truth is we need to keep in mind that when we are dealing with folks at long distance, we really have no clue who we're dealing with. As with all other folks, some are basically honest people, and some are basically thieves.

Better luck next time.
 

·
SUPER MODERATOR
Joined
·
9,142 Posts
"I found one without a title but I looked the owner up and decided, it should be okay." Mils quote:surprise::surprise::surprise::surprise::surprise:

Nuff said:grin:

Sam:nerd:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
781 Posts
OK. Everybody agrees, even you, that you made a big mistake. Meh. Everybody makes mistakes. And I guarantee you'll make more mistakes as you progress thru life. That's just the way it is.
So.....you're a new rider. Rule no#1. Know your bike! You got screwed. But did you? Now you have the opportunity to take that bike apart, find out what makes it run, how to fix it, and possibility sell it for a profit.

You're looking at possibly a gift. When you fix that old dirt bike, make it run, and ride it, you will KNOW how things work on motorcycles. All motorcycles break down. You better be prepared to fix them.

Now go get your hands dirty!
 

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
4,601 Posts
I would have to wonder about his eventual proficiency at restoring that bike. As Sam so astutely pointed out, he looked up the owner and thought it would be a good deal. My words, not his.

But you are right kb, it would be a good opportunity and an excellent learning experience, although I don't know if his health issues would be a problem for him. I just wish him well and hope it works out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
I'm so sorry you had to learn this hard lesson.

Did you ever get the title?
If not, you may be able to sue to get your money back.

I've always thought that riding a motorcycle is the ultimate in self responsibility.
When you're piloting the bike, all decisions are up to you.
There's no one there to ask for help. It’s all up to you.
I rather like that.
Remember SEE from your MSF class? Search, Evaluate, Execute.

Well, finding a bike that's appropriate for you, evaluating it’s condition and negotiating a price is the beginning of that process.
Taking full responsibility for this failed transaction is the right attitude.

Now, put it behind you and find another way forward.
Never give up.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
26,003 Posts
I believe you said as well as it could ever be said Nancy. In this day and age of cell phones, communication should have been possible. But maybe there was no cell service in that area. No title and unable to see it would have been 2 strikes. Price so high that repairs couldn't be done would have been strike 3 in my book. Nothing is so important to not pay attention to what you already know. Take responsibility yourself and don't try to blame someone else. You won't get very far in life if everything is the fault of someone else. Sorry, that is just how I see it, just like Nancy. But she said it better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,287 Posts
I am so infuriated! I'm such an idiot!
Sorry to hear this as I know you've had more than a few obstacles to getting a bike!

Not sure if you'll feel any better but I also got scammed recently and was beyond angry at myself for not being as thorough as I should have been. I was also furious at the guy, who most definitely misrepresented the truck that I bought. I figure it was about a 70/30 ratio there... :smile_big:

Turned out okay in the end because I found someone who was willing to take it and I was very upfront about the issues I had discovered, but for about two weeks I was making myself nauseous thinking about what a terrible financial situation I had put me and my family in...

And I wouldn't say you are an idiot. We all make decisions that, upon reflection, have us think "WTH was I thinking?!?!" The problem is that we usually weren't and were letting emotions (good, bad, or otherwise) guide us. Gotta try to stay logical even though it can be quite easy to get caught up in the moment.
 
  • Like
Reactions: roflol

·
Moderator - Loves All Motorcycles
Joined
·
1,251 Posts
Admittedly in my now 14 bike purchases in the past year I've made a few bumbles of my own. All of my motorcycling purchasing mistakes have revolved around 'no title' bikes. I bought them for what the seller asked, thought I'd go through the title replacement process...don't actually do it...then end up taking a bath when I sell.

I've learned an expensive lesson doing that. If I'm not willing to go through the hurdles of replacing the title, I shouldn't buy it. You're not stupid, I'm sure every experienced rider on this site has made a bad purchase before. You do your best for damage control and do your best not to let it happen again.

All is not lost with this bike. Take the VIN off it and run it through an Internet VIN checker or have your local police verify it. If it doesn't come up as stolen or with a lien on it, you can get a title for it. If it does come back as stolen and you still have contact with the seller, get the police involved and get your money back. As far as titles, you should have options from a bonded title, a rebuilt title (if you restore it a little), the Vermont loophole, or maybe even your state may offer a way to get a title. Fix the bike up a little and get a title for it and I bet you can actually make some money from this thing.

But I will say this, flipping a bike IS NOT FUN if it's not something you actually want to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I couldn't get into a course until September. So, in the meantime, I took the advice of some of the members here and looked for a dirt bike to practice in my yard.
I had been looking for a lONG time and I don't have a lot of money. I found one without a title but I looked the owner up and decided, it should be okay. I could not go in person, os my father, who knows less about motorcycles than I do, and, evidently, has NO common sense whatsoever, went to pick it up. I wasn't there to run the VIN myself. HOWEVER, had I been there, I NEVER would have bought it. It was supposed to be a like new 2018 crf125 bush wheel. My father somehow did not notice that it was filthy, the chain is rusty, the whole thing looks beat. All the rubber parts ar rotting, and best of all, IT DOES NOT START! I spent over $1600, including van rental and am stuck with this piece of junk that I probably can't sell and will probably cost more to fix than it's worth!

That's 1600 I cold have pout toward an actual motorcycle. I am partly to blame BUT I had the opportunity to have a very reasonably priced, low mileage, newer street bike, that I saw in person and was a good entry level motorcycle but my parents freaked when they saw it. It was a 2018 Rebel with ABS but my parents thought it was too big and heavy and I'd get injured somehow. I tried explaining that it's a beginner bike but, although I am more than old enough to make my own decisions, I listened to them and opted, instead for this piece of sh__ that I flushed my money down the toilet on!

I am so infuriated! I'm such an idiot!
Your dad probably knew what he was doing lol. He bought it on purpose cuz they dont want you to ride lol
 

·
Very Famous Person
Joined
·
10,003 Posts
--

As to losing the $1,600. and maybe never getting satisfaction in using what it purchased, so what? Many times in our lives we'll lose money one way or another. Right now I'm paying $1,600. every two months in payment on a new bike that depreciates faster than my payments can keep up with. I'm never going to get that money back. I'll probably lose $25,000. on the bike eventually if I can sell it down the road in five years.

But what I'm willing to lose is trade off to what I'll gain in travel fun and living experience that I would not have gotten otherwise. That touring bike is so much nicer for long travel that I'll go places I would have been reluctant to go to on my other bike. I'm going to have life experiences I don't even know about yet. So what would have been better--that I got older and alway wished I had been able to do that something several years before when I had the chance? But I blew it? I blew a chance on life?

On the other hand, you could look at the bike and say, here's a hopeless looking project, but if I put time and some small money into it, I'll have experience that I would have paid some teacher to instruct me on down at the motorcycle shop. Then, somewhere down the road, will be the thrill and satisfaction when you can actually ride it and feel proud. And you will. You can choose win if you want.

--
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Well aside from the scammed issue, you may not have been... a bike not starting is pretty easy to diagnose. First is spark, check it by removing the spark plug and kicking/or turning the bike over and see if you have any. If so move to fuel, if not then you need to check the electrical systems, and the like (a repair manual here helps)

I have found most people out there don’t know how to store a bike. They just turn off the fuel and leave the bike in the shed. The fuel evaporates and leaves junk in the jets (especially the pilot/idle jet) and the bike won’t start. This is fixed by removing the tank, draining the fuel, remove the petcock and clean it, flush out tank, replace filter and prolly most importantly rebuild the carb. Most carb kits come with new jets. Use a cleaner like the Berrymans carb dip to get the carb really good and clean.

just because it won’t start now, doesn’t mean it’s a forever dead bike. If it will start on starting fluid then most likely just some sour fuel. Oh and get a new plug too... they are cheap.

as for the title issue, also not that big of a deal. If the guy you bought it from was the last owner then his bill of sale is as good as a title, if not there is an inspection process with your local authorities and some fees that will get you a title. Here in WA it’s a quick state patrol inspection, $60 fee and you have to wait 3 years, if it is not reported stolen in that time you can get the title in your name.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top